Thread: Hose Testing

  1. #1
    FIRE549
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Question Hose Testing

    How do you test hose in your department?

    Do you follow NFPA guidelines?

    What is the test psi for 1 3/4", 2 1/2" and 3" hose?

    What is the test psi for 4" and 5"?

    What length (maximum) hose lay do you use?
    Why do you use this length?

    Is your test area flat terrain or do you use a down hill type terrain?

    How long (minutes) do you run the test for a particular section or lay?

    Thanks!!!

  2. #2
    CAPTAIN WHO
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    FIRE549;

    I wrote an article on this last year. "Hose Testing 101"

    Check out this link www.superiorfirevehicles.com/Winter2000Issue1.html

    And scroll down the page to the article.

    Hope it helps.

  3. #3
    ADSN/WFLD
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    We follow NFPA

    250 psi for smaller lines
    200 psi for =>4"

    300' max lay

    We usually set up in our parking lot with the end of the hose by a drain. The lot has a slight pitch and we can usually drain the lines without soaking the hose. (quicker turn around time from test to rack)

    All hose is tested for five minutes after getting up to pressure.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Summit City
    Posts
    19

    Default Hose

    How many follow the 300' rule? My current dept does, my former did not. I've tested 1250' 4', 1000' 2 1/2", etc with no issues. Once the air is bled off at the end, the pressure is the same throughout the length of hose and there is no friction loss. Just throwin' it out for discussion. Sure saves on time. Never did exceed those lengths.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Eno821302's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    127

    Question

    If all else is equal, it makes me wonder why they had the 300ft rule there in the first place? Is it because "they" were worried about departments having enough hose left out of the test to compliment their in service truck if it had to go on a call? Are they saying you can only take 300' off the truck?

    Does it having something to do with having more potential for bursts, or more volume of water creating more problems?

    Any thoughts on why the rule is there? Both my departments follow that rule mostly because we're restricted to that amount of space anyways... but it sure would be nice to stretch things out if we could and save on some of the setup.
    Ian "Eno" McLeod
    Senior Firefighter /EMT-A, A Shift
    HESD / OFD
    "To me, the charm of an encyclopedia is that it knows and I needn't."

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