Thread: Hose lays

  1. #1
    Junior Member

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    Aug 2001
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    Ontario
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    Default Hose lays

    What are the best ways to lay 1"3/4 quick attack cross lay, we have recieved 2 new trucks and there have been many discussions on this. There will be 200 feet on each cross lay.

  2. #2
    Member

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    Sep 2001
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    new york
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    on my rigs we have 2 crooslays with 200' in each bed also..one has a straight tip (15/16),and the other has a tft(fog)..we pack them conventional back and forth then when you get to the last length(50ft)we make that a donut role...i'm not sure if your familiar with it but after you pack the first 150' you would turn the nozzle mans length up and role it around as you finish packing it..make sure as you pack it it stays inside the last turn you just packed then as the length comes to the male end attach the nozzle and place it in the middle of the pack..these set-ups work great because the nozzle man steps up and can pull the nozzle length a little bit and scope his arm under the roll and pull it off the rig..the rest of the stretch comes off smoothly to..


    any questions you can email at rcbadabing182@firehousemail.com

  3. #3
    Junior Member

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    Aug 2000
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    northern SouthCentral PA
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    We use 200 ft crosslays in my area. Most departments pack them in a similar manner, called a shoulder load. (I will do my best to explain it clearly...)

    After connecting the first section of hose to the discharge, the first 100 ft are loaded flat, in a single stack configuration. Some departments leave a small "hand loop" in the first layer. The coupling of the second section of hose is fed the whole way to the opposite side you want the line comoing off of and left hanging for now. Then take the nozzle and attach it to another section of hose, feed the hose into the crosslay bed so that the "running" end loops back under the nozzle. Loop the hose back over the nozzle and continue loading the remainder on top of the hose load. When you have loaded the second 100 ft, couple to the first 100 ft, feeding the loose hose on top of the load.
    To use this hose load, take the nozzle and pull it out onto your shoulder, allowing you to advance the first 100 ft towards the fire, pulling the second 100 ft behind you.

    Sounds confusing, but once you do it a couple times, it becomes second nature. I have a bitmap drawing if you are interested.
    If your dispatcher doesn't know what you are doing, I hope the God of your choice does!
    Stay safe...

  4. #4
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    Alberta, Canada
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    We have 2 preconnected 200' x 1 3/4" lines and 1 preconnected 200' x 2 1/2" line on all pumps and the quint. Currently the two methods used to pack them are minute man loads for the 1 3/4" and a flat load for the 2 1/2" line. They both work well for us but I have a prefernce for the minute man load because I find it is easier to lay the line out in an ordrely fashsion while walking towards the house. What we call the minute man load sounds like the shoulder load described by dcfa 20. It can be found on page 422 of the 4th edition of Essentials of Fire Fighting.

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