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  1. #1
    danieltaylor
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post UK Firefighter Training - A new approach

    I thought that some of you may be interested in a new approach to fire staff training and development being adopted in the UK.

    Following a set of major fire disasters in the 80's and 90's, the British government decided that the quality of training in the British fire service was pretty poor. Following an investigation they found that :-

    Training Recording - Although brigades were recording training at the training centre, they were not recording the drills and exercises that were undertaken at the station. Those that were recording training, could not actually prove from the records that it actually happened. They were unable to show corroborated proof that for example fire-fighter smith had undertaken 30 Breathing Apparatus drills. In a court of law this level of proof was important.

    Incident Recording - Whilst some brigades were recording "who attended an incident" through the command and control/dispatch systems, they were not recording "what tasks they did", "what problems they had" and make assessments of their competence including evidence. The government required that activities, equipment usage were recorded against a fire-fighter and that an officer assess their competence and an individual required to corroborate

    Development Plans - How you progressed in the fire department depended on who you worked with and how well you fitted in. There was no pre-set development plans for an individuals career

    Competence for Roles - They found that the levels of competence were different in each department. Training was not the same throughout the country, and the abilities in one fire department was different.

    What the British Government created was a document and policy for the UK fire departments called "Training For Competence" which was mandatory to all fire departments. This necessitated that department :-

    1. Record all training whether on-station or at a training academy - and have it corroborated by an individual so that it can be proven
    2. Record all activity at an incident, allowing officers to make judgements as to level of competence - and again have the individual concerned corroborate
    3. Allow problems in a fire-fighters competence to be rectified by Identifying a training input
    4. Have the ability to record evidence and proof
    5. To assess the quality of training and staff development

    They followed this up by developing competence based training standards for each role. These role maps set our criteria that must be fulfilled by an individual before they can be deemed competent for any role, e.g. Fire-fighter, Station Commander etc. These were standard across the whole of the UK

    We developed a computer software application that could support all this. Like most systems it will manage the training academy and its administrative tasks, but it does what no other system in the world can do. It allows officers to log in and see details about their staffs development plans. It allows them to record the information regarding what tasks an individual undertook that day whether training or incident based, and allowed assessments of competence. It then allows the individual to log on and see what has been said about them and to corroborate.

    The system builds a complete training and experience history of any fire-fighter, including proof and evidence. But most importantly instead of records being inputted manually at the fire department HQ it is being distributed on to every fire station.

    We are now launching the system in the US and are currently talking to a number of fire departments about it. We will be showing it at the IAFC FRI2000 (Booth 4402) show this month in Dallas. I guarantee the concept behind the system is unlike any simplistic training recording system which fire department use now.

    If you are interested in finding more please do not hesitate to contact me or to visit our booth at the show.

    Thanks


    Daniel Taylor


  2. #2
    Fireguy49
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    My department has statred doing some of these things. Another thing that we have started doing is having each firefighter keep a log of what apparatus he/she drives, to what type of call or just driver training, how long they drove, etc. This is very important especially if the driver has an accident. When it goes to court the driving records come into play. We will be going through a court case within the next month resulting from a fatal accident between a 1/2 ton and an engine about 2 years ago. Today it's important that good records are kept in all department as accountability is in the forefront.

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    39

    Default Online Fire Training and Education/CEUs

    Quote Originally Posted by danieltaylor View Post
    I thought that some of you may be interested in a new approach to fire staff training and development being adopted in the UK.

    Following a set of major fire disasters in the 80's and 90's, the British government decided that the quality of training in the British fire service was pretty poor. Following an investigation they found that :-

    Training Recording - Although brigades were recording training at the training centre, they were not recording the drills and exercises that were undertaken at the station. Those that were recording training, could not actually prove from the records that it actually happened. They were unable to show corroborated proof that for example fire-fighter smith had undertaken 30 Breathing Apparatus drills. In a court of law this level of proof was important.

    Incident Recording - Whilst some brigades were recording "who attended an incident" through the command and control/dispatch systems, they were not recording "what tasks they did", "what problems they had" and make assessments of their competence including evidence. The government required that activities, equipment usage were recorded against a fire-fighter and that an officer assess their competence and an individual required to corroborate

    Development Plans - How you progressed in the fire department depended on who you worked with and how well you fitted in. There was no pre-set development plans for an individuals career

    Competence for Roles - They found that the levels of competence were different in each department. Training was not the same throughout the country, and the abilities in one fire department was different.

    What the British Government created was a document and policy for the UK fire departments called "Training For Competence" which was mandatory to all fire departments. This necessitated that department :-

    1. Record all training whether on-station or at a training academy - and have it corroborated by an individual so that it can be proven
    2. Record all activity at an incident, allowing officers to make judgements as to level of competence - and again have the individual concerned corroborate
    3. Allow problems in a fire-fighters competence to be rectified by Identifying a training input
    4. Have the ability to record evidence and proof
    5. To assess the quality of training and staff development

    They followed this up by developing competence based training standards for each role. These role maps set our criteria that must be fulfilled by an individual before they can be deemed competent for any role, e.g. Fire-fighter, Station Commander etc. These were standard across the whole of the UK

    We developed a computer software application that could support all this. Like most systems it will manage the training academy and its administrative tasks, but it does what no other system in the world can do. It allows officers to log in and see details about their staffs development plans. It allows them to record the information regarding what tasks an individual undertook that day whether training or incident based, and allowed assessments of competence. It then allows the individual to log on and see what has been said about them and to corroborate.

    The system builds a complete training and experience history of any fire-fighter, including proof and evidence. But most importantly instead of records being inputted manually at the fire department HQ it is being distributed on to every fire station.

    We are now launching the system in the US and are currently talking to a number of fire departments about it. We will be showing it at the IAFC FRI2000 (Booth 4402) show this month in Dallas. I guarantee the concept behind the system is unlike any simplistic training recording system which fire department use now.

    If you are interested in finding more please do not hesitate to contact me or to visit our booth at the show.

    Thanks


    Daniel Taylor
    Online Training for Fire departments and training officers to follow....

    http://www.openpublicsafetyinstitute.org/

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    39

    Default Online Fire Training

    Quote Originally Posted by Fireguy49 View Post
    My department has statred doing some of these things. Another thing that we have started doing is having each firefighter keep a log of what apparatus he/she drives, to what type of call or just driver training, how long they drove, etc. This is very important especially if the driver has an accident. When it goes to court the driving records come into play. We will be going through a court case within the next month resulting from a fatal accident between a 1/2 ton and an engine about 2 years ago. Today it's important that good records are kept in all department as accountability is in the forefront.
    Online Training for Fire departments and training officers to follow....

    http://www.openpublicsafetyinstitute.org/

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