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  1. #1
    stone35
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default Bomb Threat SOP's

    Recently our department responded to a potential bomb situation, and communication was terrible. During our regularly scheduled meeting I inquired as to what our SOP's say about bomb threats and other terroristic activity. No one could give me an answer. I think the reason is that we just don't have any.

    I would be very appreciative to you and your department if you have SOP's for bomb threats that you send me a copy or a brief. If you would rather fax them please email me and I will get you the fax number.

    Thanks in advance.
    Stone35


  2. #2
    721
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    I can't speak for training in other departments, or areas, but I don't recall any "bomb identification" courses offered at the county fire schools.

    Why does everyone assume that is the duty of a firefighter to perform bomb searches. Watching the news will show that they can be deguised to look like anything you might to normally find in a school, office building, etc.

    Without the training a FF has no business being sent in to search, just as no FF should be sent in a burning structure until they are properly trained.

    The local news showed several FF's entering a school where a suspected bomb had been found, walking into the school. No SCBA, but they each had a 20lb dry chemical extinguisher with them.

    In this case, the device had been found, so it wasn't to search, so why were they going inside, and what the ???? were they going to extinguish?

    As a firefighter, I have been trained to extinguish a fire in a burning building, search for victims in a building, etc. This qualifies me to enter a building to search for victims and/or fight fire.

    I have not been trained to disarm a bomb, thus I should never be sent in to deal with a bomb, suspect or real.

    This is a task for the local law eforcement, or FBI, or ATF, when they are trained and equipped to deal with these calls.

    Like they say, everyone has an opinion, and that mine.

    Stay safe
    Miles

    P.S. the story mention here turned out to be a hoax by one of the students, a 12 year old, that is probably thinking it wasn't too bright as he sits in juvinal detention tonight.



    [This message has been edited by 721 (edited May 13, 1999).]

  3. #3
    PGTICK98
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    i would have to agree whole heartedly with 721. i think that the best SOP would call for an evac of the area to a pre-determined, quote unquote, "safe distance" and have the fire and EMS units stage and stand by to perform there duties should the bomb go off and they are needed in suppression and medical areas. but i also believe that the SOP should give scene control to the sr bomb tech on the scene, although the bomb may go off, there could be other devices, and the suppression and medical operations of the first explosion could place undue risk on the service providers. the main thing is to be smart about things and not go past what you ar trained to do.

    ------------------
    the tick

  4. #4
    Drew Smith
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    We don't do bombs.

    Here is our SOP in a nut shell:
    1) The on-duty command officer reports to the police command post as liaison.
    2) We keep all apparatus in the station (our district is small).
    3) We have made it clear (to both our members and the police) that we do not look for bombs, do not handle bombs, etc.
    4) If a bomb goes off we will do the usual rescue and fire stuff. If someone is disabled in the building and needs to be removed prior to detonation we will try to get them out but not if they are part of/connected to the bomb.
    5) We have a plan for a bomb threat to the station. Basically, we evacuate the station leaving the rigs in place (who knows if the bomb is rigged to one) and tell dispatch from a phone/radio outside of our dilema. We have not had this happed ever, but this is our plan. Our station is attached to the police and village hall.

  5. #5
    scania
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    I think Itīs madness that they call upon the firedepatment to unfuse a bomb Itīs better and far more wiser to call the local pdīs desposal unit to handel explosives your training is basically to save lives and property.Take care you all

    ------------------
    viking

  6. #6
    Chris Stabile
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Just read your post. I dont' think that Stone35 was looking for SOP's on how to disarm an explosive device.

    Our guideline is that we do not respond to bomb threats. If the Sheriff's Office EOD finds a suspicious package, a Haz-Mat response is initiated. Our Haz-Mat Team trains regularly with the EOD Team. All Fire-Rescue personnel stay in the Cold Zone, with the exception of the Haz-Mat people. The Haz-Mat Team works in the Warm Zone with the EOD personnel. We assist them with suiting-up, rehab, etc.

    Hope this helps.


  7. #7
    Warren Vaughn
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    One big thing that needs to be in ANY SOP is that all radio comminications cease before you get on the scene. A local department recently responded to a bomb threat at a local business and pulled right up to the door, and talking 900 miles a minute on the radio. Not a good thing.

  8. #8
    E229Lt
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Warren makes a great point. Radios and suspected devices don't mix. The possibility of radio communications activating a device is very real.
    Also, apparatus systems which transmit automatically such as, Nederman exhaust systems, MDTs, GPS and other tracking devices transmit a signal about every 30 seconds.

    Now for an anecdote:
    Several years ago we were called to an incident where "Grucci Fireworks" was setting up a show. Huge signs stating "No Radios Beyond This Point"
    Our Lt. walks out to where they were setting up some displays and found out they had had a premature firing, but all was fine. As he walked back to the rig and keyed his radio to make his report, 5 more of Grucci's mortars fired. They were not pleased.

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