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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Georgia
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    1

    Default ?Possible Anthrax situations?

    I am looking for departmental policies/protocols for "possible" Anthrax calls. We have a policy which is I believe is not too stable. Looking for web sites and suggestions. Thanks


  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Daytona Beach, FL, US
    Posts
    187

    Default

    I just wrote a "guideline" for my agency in responding to possible anthrax incidents. Most of the material I found was from our local Health Department, the CDC website, and the U.S. Postal site. If you would like, I can fax or snailmail you a copy of ours. Basically all I did was read the info and then incorperate it wiht our response to a Hazmat or Bomb situation. Also if you type "anthrax" into your web search engine, that should bring up a lot of info.

    You can email me at
    psoheather@hotmail.com

    Good luck,
    Heather
    Bless all of our Fallen Brothers and Sisters. You will not be forgotten

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
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    13,537

    Default

    Any response protocol for a possible WMD incident should clearly state and take into consideration that it is a crime scene. Life safety is the primary issue, as with any bomb/haz mat incident. But after that, it is a clear cut crime scene and should be treated as such.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Ewing, NJ
    Posts
    314
    The above is MY OPINION only and not that of anyone else. I am not representing any organization in making a post here!!!!

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    540

    Default

    STAY AT HOME!!!!

    Seriously we don't run Haz-Mat at all.
    We call them in. We only direct traffic on those calls. That is when you realize there really is such thing as a dumb question.
    Proud to be IACOJ Illinois Chapter--Deemed "Crustworthy" Jan, 2003

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Flagstaff, AZ, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default

    I was just given the assignment of formulating the same type of thing for our Department. I can get you a copy by email or fax if you will email me and give me your address, etc.

    Have a good one and be careful!
    A proud member of the Highlands Firefighters, Local 1505.<br />The opinions and information provided are my own and do not reflect the views of my Department or Local 1505.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    29

    Post

    Our dept. is not really ready to cope w/ a real anthrax situation. We have discussed it somewhat but it could get real confusing. The people from the cdc told us to wash our gear with clorox. That will break down expensive gear. I have not been trained on a class a suit. We call in the county haz mat. What concerns me is being there first. Really there are a lot of things out there every day that are more dangerous to me than the threat of anthrax.
    God Bless our wonderful country.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
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    13,537

    Post

    Firepara;
    Bad way to look at this. A couple of thoughts;

    1. DO NOT wash your turnout gear in Clorox. IF you are exposed, you can wash it down with copious amounts of water, and then wash the gear in a conventional washing machine with detergent (anti-bacterial if you can find it). Washing it in Clorox is going to ruin the gear and it is like killing flies with a sledgehammer.

    2. If you are not trained as a hazmat thech, you do not put yourself in a position to come into contact with the agent. You will not go to an anthrax scene and find 10 people lying on the ground having a seizure. There will be no acute rescue threat. Your best bet is to secure the area as a crime scene and await a hazmat unit. You can deal with the exposed persons exposure by assisting them with decon and possible medical screening. You can get the HVAC system shut down, etc. But you do not put yourself in harm's way when you are not trained and not equipped to do so. There is a difference between heroism and stupidity.

    A chemical attack will be different in that there will be an acute rescue problem. However, if you are not properly equipped, you still don't go. Adding more victims to the incident doesn't prove anything. Assist with evac and mass decon of the walking wounded and secure the site for hazmat.

    3. Do not look at this as "this will never happen here". You train for plane crashes, rail derailments, bus crashes, conventional hazmat, etc. and they will probably never happen either. A confirmed anthrax incident will be a big deal. Your dept. should be aware of the FACTS regarding bio/chemical/nuclear attack. Get the training and assure yourselves that the incident will be handled appropriately.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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