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Thread: Gen-x ???????

  1. #21
    Quigs
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I think it all comes down to just what you want to get out of this job, and how much it means to you. Whaether it's a new guy or an older guy, I'm sure we all have the guys on the shift that don't belong... But I'm sure a lot of us have shifts that always seem to produce better firefighters or officers than others.

    The younger guys coming on the shift are the future of the department. If they get treated fairly, are well-trained, get the opportunity to work hand-in-hand with a good shift, and are well-disciplined, they have a better chance of growing than they do if they are not treated fairly, don't get good training, and lack good discipline. If a guy comes to work on a shift with a bunch of bums... eventually he's going to fall into that groove.... just how deep into the groove he falls is up to us.


  2. #22
    Doo600
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    You people can't be that closed minded to believe that it has something to do with Generation X. I am a Gen-Xer(and proud), and officer on our medium sized department. I've seen these guys you talk about come and go. I've also seen the older ones treat the new guys like crap and when they take a stand and say they aren't going to take it anymore, the older guys say that he's a Gen-Xer with an attitude problem. Fact is, it's a personal problem. Now, I'm no psychologist but I believe it comes down to how you were raised and how you respect others. I also partially agree with Fyredup when he says these guys come into the job never having a real job on the outside. The idiots of the department get a hold of him and tell him to rise up and fight the system causing turmoil. My point is saying that it's the Gen Xer's is no better than judging a black man strictly because of his color or a asian person because they have different looking eyes. Stop judging a generation and start judging the individual, we all work in the most respected job on earth and if we can lead by example the whole world just might follow. Keep the city safe!

  3. #23
    fyrpilot
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Last year I was assigned to work with a guy who had 27 years on the job (I had 3). He was hired when I was 3 weeks old so there was a signifigant age difference. This turned out to be my best experience yet as I learned quite a few "tricks of the trade". I respected his experience, followed his advice and combined it with my training to become a better firefighter. He has since retired and is missed dearly.
    Unfortunately, there are quite a few "old timers" who do not want to do the job as its required today (ie.. EMS, public service calls, etc...). So many of us "new" guys only know the fire service in this way and I can see where the friction can come from. I guess both sides need to open their eyes and lighten up a little.
    Remember, this is the BEST job there is!

  4. #24
    pmedic5424
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Lt,
    I can definitely understand your viewpoint. I guess I'm considered a "Gen-Xer" being 24 years old. I don't know if it's a southern problem, since I work right below you, in Clayton County. However, I think it's more the quality of the people being hired, not the age. I have been in the fire service for 5 years, and I definitely did my share of scrub work. I think it's paying your dues. Besides, someone who's been there a while undoubtedly went through the same "abuse" before I did. My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage. It's the way of the world now, and the firehouse just can't adjust to this. We are being forced to run stations like a business office, and it can't be done. We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation. This is the environment we are hiring from, and the new wave of employees, with their new outlooks and rules of acceptance, are clashing with the older, more experienced veterans. The pecking order is scrambled in this situation, and it's a shame. It was a good tool to bring young people into an occupation that depends on order and discipline to succeed. I was brought up by a very experienced crew, who did it their way, and I wouldn't trade it for the world.

  5. #25
    BOMBERODAVE
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    i have 6 years in and I believe that if everyone does their job be it a Lt., Capt.,F.F., Probie, or the Chief himself, If their is a job to be done DO IT! don't complain about it because the job is a pee on job and it is beneth you (There is no such thing). If you are standing around hearing the rookie train the probies HELP HIM!!!! insted of criticize
    We all forget that we must count on each other either training, at the house, and at the big ones.
    Above all we need to grow up! be it gen.x pre WW-2, baby boomers, 49ers whatever..
    we all have a job to do people and that is to protect the citizens of you communities.
    and it's equipment they "buy" for you. So quit complaining and do it!
    and about Gen-X wich I am proud to be part i can say we don't know it all. and if we don't shut up and listen we will repeat those mistakes wich were warned about.

    [This message has been edited by BOMBERODAVE (edited September 01, 2000).]

  6. #26
    bafirefighter
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Thumbs down

    Sorry you feel the way you do towards new Firefighters. It is guys like you who have probably never had to test for the job or know what it is like to have to take 20-50 test across the nation in order to get into the job. I realize "old Dogs" need respect but I also Know that some of the "Old dogs" thinks it is ok to treat a new guy like ****. Sorry but times have changed you are correct no crybabies aloud so maybe you should retire, sounds like you are crying!!!!

  7. #27
    Lt. Chester
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    It should be called "Generation (WH)Y????

  8. #28
    Lt.Todd
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    bafirefighter,Since it's obvious to me that you are a Gen-x'er you may have had a problem understanding my orginial post.Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.I was curious if this was problem everywhere!I have helped train over 100 new firefighters, and I can say this with some experience.The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job.It's the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders,the I know everything attitudes.I never said or meant that all Gen-X'ers are like this,but there are alot of them.I have never treated any new firefighter with anything less then respect,I just expect the same!! By the way, I tested with numerous departments prior to landing this job 12 years ago.I then tested for driver and Lieutenant, and soon Captain.SERVE WITH PRIDE

  9. #29
    JetAxe
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Lt.Todd It is true that the rooks coming in today are different. I am a new Captain in a large metro dept in south east Texas and I see all of the above in our department. I try not to take anything personal. That gives me the ability to be patient. The only place I do not like to see this so called Gen X attitude is on the fire ground.

    If this attitude is displayed on the fire ground, I can assure you that It will not be tolerated and corrective action will be taken. I have not had a problem there yet though.

    As for the station duties, they can dislike their job all they want, I am still gonna see that it gets done!

  10. #30
    Bill Nowicki
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Everyone who has ever come on the job has experienced the abuse that comed with being a rookie. It's what you make of it that will determine how the rest of your career goes. I'm in a mid sized dept in the nertheast and my first 4 years were full of "hazing" but now that I have 10+ years on the job, I find that all those little shots and rituals were worth it. I still won't wear a nomex hood and I think Bunker pants are overrated except in cold weather. P.S. I wear a leather helmet. Noe for the disclaimer...the opinions expressed are only mine and do not represent the official policies of my department.

  11. #31
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH!

    You have to EARN respect to get respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed,(in the last 6 months)and I'm not gonna' do that because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers, you're not being very respectful of the tradition of your new lifestyle.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless. They watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked. It's how it's always been.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As was previously quoted, this isn't an office situation. It's a family situation!

    We are like a family living day to day. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates.
    We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together.
    We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    They will try to distance themselves as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    In closing just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long.
    Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.

    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?
    Hopefully that kid at home has some chores to do. Some RESPONSIBILITY.
    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, and getting you water.
    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.

    JMHO

    Sorry I went on so long,

    McGyver

    "All for one, and one for all..."
    Not
    "All for one and one for ME"


    Guess I need this.....

    This is my opinion only, and does not reflect the opinions or views of the City or Department I work for. (even though I don't really specify what dept that is)

  12. #32
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH

    You have to earn my respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed (in the last 6 months) and I'm not gonna' do that, because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless, they watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As the first quote said, we are like a family at work. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates. We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together. We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being able to be fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    It's like a new neighbor coming to your personal house and telling you you need to eat dinner a half an hour earlier than when you've done for years,or you can't park your car in the driveway anymore because he doesn' like it.

    They will try to distance themselves (since they can't kick your a55) as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    Just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long. Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.

    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?

    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, getting you water, and basically watchin' out for your a55.

    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.

    "All for one, and one for ALL"
    NOT
    "All for one, and one for ME"

    McGyver


  13. #33
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH

    You have to earn my respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed (in the last 6 months) and I'm not gonna' do that, because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless, they watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As the first quote said, we are like a family at work. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates. We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together. We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being able to be fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    They will try to distance themselves as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    In closing just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long. Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.
    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?
    Hopefully that kid at home has some chores to do. Some RESPONSIBILITY.
    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, and getting you water.
    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.


    "All for one and one for ALL"
    Not
    "All for one and one for ME"

    McGyver

  14. #34
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH

    You have to earn my respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed (in the last 6 months) and I'm not gonna' do that, because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless, they watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As the first quote said, we are like a family at work. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates. We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together. We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being able to be fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    They will try to distance themselves as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    In closing just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long. Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.
    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?
    Hopefully that kid at home has some chores to do. Some RESPONSIBILITY.
    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, and getting you water.
    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.

  15. #35
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    xxxxxxxxxxxxx

  16. #36
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH

    You have to earn my respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed (in the last 6 months) and I'm not gonna' do that, because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless, they watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As the first quote said, we are like a family at work. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates. We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together. We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being able to be fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    They will try to distance themselves as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    In closing just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long. Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.
    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?
    Hopefully that kid at home has some chores to do. Some RESPONSIBILITY.
    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, and getting you water.
    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.

    McGyver

  17. #37
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH

    You have to earn my respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed (in the last 6 months) and I'm not gonna' do that, because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless, they watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As the first quote said, we are like a family at work. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates. We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together. We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being able to be fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    They will try to distance themselves as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    In closing just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long. Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.
    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?
    Hopefully that kid at home has some chores to do. Some RESPONSIBILITY.
    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, and getting you water.
    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.

  18. #38
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH

    You have to earn my respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed (in the last 6 months) and I'm not gonna' do that, because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless, they watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As the first quote said, we are like a family at work. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates. We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together. We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being able to be fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    They will try to distance themselves as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    In closing just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long. Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.
    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?
    Hopefully that kid at home has some chores to do. Some RESPONSIBILITY.
    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, and getting you water.
    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.

  19. #39
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    There were a few profound quotes in this thread, on this subject, that I strongly agree with.

    Quote from PMedic5424:
    My theory is that the highly "PC" world we live in is affecting station life. You can't say, do or even think anything without offending or degrading someone. I think it's ridiculous. And some of the people coming into the fire service today recognize this, and use it to their advantage.
    We eat, sleep, study, LIVE at our jobs, and can't be compared to any other occupation.

    Quote from Lt.Todd:
    Younger people today have a very give-me-everything attitude.
    The ones who are 25 and up, are married and held a different job prior to joining the fire service have a better attitude and are willing to work and learn about this job. Itís the true Gen-X'ers that have this big chip on their shoulders, the I know everything attitudes.


    I'm 37 years old, 8 yrs on the job. I did 4 years in the military, and worked in a couple different jobs before I got the best job in the world.

    These guys said it very well. I'm not saying that at 18 I was perfect. I'm not now. I'm far from it. I know I didn't think ANYONE owed me ANYTHING I didn't earn.
    It seems today that these younger guys are of that mindset.

    You're "dissin' me". WAAAH

    You have to earn my respect buster!

    If you come walkin' in my "house" tellin' me times have changed (in the last 6 months) and I'm not gonna' do that, because it embarrasses me, or hurts my feelings, to mop the kitchen, and do the dishes, or scrub the crappers.

    Guess what. EVERY guy you want to say is "ridin the lazy-boy" did EXACTLY what you are (supposed to be) doing.
    I'm sure they didn't like it any more than you do, but did it nonetheless, they watched the guys (long retired) drinkiní coffee while they worked.

    When you break "tradition", and try to buck the system by whining about how you are being "hazed" or "dissed" or "discriminated against", what pedestal do you expect your brother and sister "housemates" to put you on.

    As the first quote said, we are like a family at work. I spend a third of my life (not to mention overtime) w/ my engine housemates. We spend a lot of holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries together. We also are great friends off the job.

    It's my view that someone new to a family would want to try their damnedest to fit in.

    Instead nowadays, you are walkin' on eggshells. Worried you might slip out some unintentional "offensive" word, gesture, or whatever.

    My Dad used to tell me "Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words/names will never hurt you"

    Doesn't anyoneís parents tell their kids this anymore. I think the hand them their lawyers business card instead.

    I wore braces on my teeth in school I wish I had a nickel for every time I was called "railroad tracks" or some other name. It was upsetting, but I (nor my Dad) ever thought to sue the school. He just ran the Sticks&Stones quote by me.

    This post isn't going to change anything, that's for sure, but maybe a few people who read this will take it to heart. You may think I'm digressing from the subject, but I think this is dead on!

    When you threaten a person in their "house", w/ being able to be fired from their career for a slip of the tongue, or an "accidentally emptied bucket of water down the hose tower on the cub" because you hurt their feelings, how do you expect them to act toward you?

    They will try to distance themselves as much as possible from you, as to not be able to offend you. (This can also be considered as harassment) How much experience are you going to pick up that way.
    I think you can learn maybe 10-20% of this job from reading it in a book. The rest is experience. War stories can, besides their entertainment value, teach volumes.

    In closing just remember, the old timers HAVE been there and DONE THAT.
    They took buckets, flour on the sheets, and mashed potatoes in the shoes (laces tied in knots). When you get it done to you, remember how they did it and laugh it off. (If theyíre not doing this stuff to you, they probably donít like you.) Youíll have a cub to do it to before long. Itís TRADITION, not a personal attack on your inner child.
    Listen to the stories and same types of terms and pranks played in these forums from across the country. Computers have only been around for a while. Thatís not how they were spread. They are age-old traditions. They didnít just start when you hit the street.
    Just be thankful we donít use horses anymore!

    Lastly, youíre going to be the 50-year-old guy some day. Do you think you are going to feel like you are supposed to be doing the crappers, when thereís a kid around the firehouse thatís the same age as your kid at home?
    Hopefully that kid at home has some chores to do. Some RESPONSIBILITY.
    That old timer is responsible for getting you to the scene safe, and getting you water.
    I donít condone old timers going to bed when they get to work. (Iím not saying it doesnít happen) They have their apparatus to check out. Maybe write a test for you to take after chow. If that kind of thing is going on, your officer isnít doing his job.

  20. #40
    McGyver
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    test

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