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Thread: Emergency Lights for Vol FF/EMTs

  1. #26
    20-40
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In West Virginia it it Red/White for FD and Blue/White for EMS (POV Only.) Police are the only permanent emergency vehicles that have blue (blue/red), firetrucks & EMS rigs all have red and white.

  2. #27
    fireman703
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Here in Washington the only light I know of is green for Vol. FF. Dash or roof mounted. No special priveledges, only a courtesy request. I know of no one who uses lights in POV's any more. I have tried to use one, but due to the public having no exposure to green lights they did not respond in any way.

  3. #28
    TommyB
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    As one of the earlier posters said, here in NC it's red for vol ff & rescue. As in several other states, this is a "courtesy" light only. Don't want to get into the debate of whether or not these should be allowed, but my feeling is that in areas served by volunteer depts, you already have the built in delay of responding from wherever you're at to the station or direct to scene, so I would like to see the red lights used by vollies recognized as that of an emergency vehicle with all attendant rights and responsibilities.
    Sirens for chief and asst chief only in NC. Also, what type of light(s) you use are up to the dept. Some depts allow anything, and some of their folks have POV's lit up so much it looks like a 747 is landing behind you. I've seen some POVs in our county with lightbar, grill flashers, corner strobes, etc. Looks a little ridiculous in my opinion. Most guys just have a dashlight of some type.

  4. #29
    Preston
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    Alabama law states that you cannot operate any emergency light on any POV unless parked.
    Pretty stupid in a state that has over 80% volunteer.

  5. #30
    Aerial 131
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In Washington it must be a fix (no stobe or flashing) GREEN light in the grill no more than 30? inches about the ground. You must still obey all rules of the road and drive in a safe normal manner to the station or the call. It is written up in the RCW (Revised Codes of Wahington) In my volunteer department hardly anyone uses them any more due to amount of vehicle traffic and stop signals we have to move through. I get there just as fast as now as I did 20 years ago when I did use one.

    Don Zimmerman

  6. #31
    RyanT
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Just wanted to comment on NY's laws. Legally the blue or green light can only be 32 Candle Power (same "intensity" as a parking light)

    I'm only 999,968 off!

    ------------------
    -
    Ryan Tourge
    1st Lieutenant
    Chestertown Vol. Fire Company
    Chestertown, NY

  7. #32
    Dr. Law
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Illinois VFD and Ambulance Vols

    Blue Lights Only, Of whatever variety and how many you want them. Strobes, beacons, flashers, whatever. It is also suggested that when visiting Chicago you take your light down as the CPD used blue for the longest time on their squads and were very proprietary about that color.
    Used to be that Chiefs could use red lights.
    No more.
    (Also used to be that all vols could have sirens, but that is also no more the case)
    Prior law provided that the blue light had to be mounted behind the front seat, so most used to have them in the rear window. This was dropped somewhere in the 70's or 80's.
    Some places however, aided by a blind-eye of local law enforcement, have been using blue and white in lightbars and such. This however, is rare and only in a few select places.
    By the way, having used many dashlights in my career, from flashing spotlight (Able2) dashlights to teardrop (Fed and SVP), to pancake (S&W) to mirrored lights (Fed and SVP) and strobes (Whelen), I find that the one that has done the best for me in clearing traffic is the Federal Magna-beam, the oscillating version of the Fed Fire-Beam (and I am not doing this as an advertisement but because I see the people do pull over for me from a distance using just that one light).

  8. #33
    Dr. Law
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    Illinois VFD and Ambulance Vols

    Blue Lights Only, Of whatever variety and how many you want them. Strobes, beacons, flashers, whatever. It is also suggested that when visiting Chicago you take your light down as the CPD used blue for the longest time on their squads and were very proprietary about that color.
    Used to be that Chiefs could use red lights.
    No more.
    (Also used to be that all vols could have sirens, but that is also no more the case)
    Prior law provided that the blue light had to be mounted behind the front seat, so most used to have them in the rear window. This was dropped somewhere in the 70's or 80's.
    Some places however, aided by a blind-eye of local law enforcement, have been using blue and white in lightbars and such. This however, is rare and only in a few select places.
    By the way, having used many dashlights in my career, from flashing spotlight (Able2) dashlights to teardrop (Fed and SVP), to pancake (S&W) to mirrored lights (Fed and SVP) and strobes (Whelen), I find that the one that has done the best for me in clearing traffic is the Federal Magna-beam, the oscillating version of the Fed Fire-Beam (and I am not doing this as an advertisement but because I see the people do pull over for me from a distance using just that one light).

  9. #34
    GBordas
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    MA - Red, Dashboard mounted, Wig-Wag headlights permitted also. No Siren



    [This message has been edited by GBordas (edited 01-12-2001).]

  10. #35
    FireRsq107
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Preston
    Hollins Alabama
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Alabama law states that you cannot operate any emergency light on any POV unless parked.
    Pretty stupid in a state that has over 80% volunteer.

    Very true Preston but.......

    If your VFD is in a mulnicipality, the police chief can give you permission to use emergency lights while moving, our chief allows us to use hideaway strobes and wig-wag headlights on our vehicles.


    ------------------
    Andrew Coe
    Green Pond Fire & Rescue Service.

  11. #36
    sgfd
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    State of Wisconsin trucks and ambulances red and or red/white. P.O.V.'s same siren also. Trucks can use green and blue when parked off-road. This is used to identify the command post.

  12. #37
    APG1
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Anyone know if wigwags are legal in the state of IL? I've never been able to get a definitive answer (Or a look at the state vehicle code).

  13. #38
    Dr. Law
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Cool

    In Illinois, wig-wag or flashing headlights are still illegal for anything but the police cars and fire-trucks or ambulances.
    However, a new twist, some funeral homes are using them (Only the hardest-butt Trooper will stop a funeral procession, I guess)

  14. #39
    vollieff
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Just a thought for you all wanting standard lighting laws for vollies (which I do agree with, but...). I think I am correct in stating that most states, let alone counties run different color schemes for there emergency (police, etc.) vehicles. So we would have to have an entire emergency lighting policy for police, ambulance, fire trucks, fire police, and Emt/FF's for the entire country. It would be great, but most polititions (at national level) can't even agree on funding, mutual aid, and fire taxes for vollie depts let alone trying to get all of us to one light scheme. Some believe we shouldn't be running lights at all. Besides people have a hard enough time just getting out of the way of a fire truck responding let alone changing lighting schemes.

    Just a thought, would like any thoughts please.

  15. #40
    MetalMedic
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Smile

    Standard lighting "laws" would not be the logical place to start. vollieff is correct in stating that the politicians wouldn't be able to address such an issue. The more reaonable approach is as I stated before, the NFPA or NVFC or some other "recognized" organization needs to create a set "standard" for emergency lighting on personal vehicles. THEN, using that standard as a lever, the politicians can painlessly accomplish what is really needed.

    Of course, I will probably not live long enough to see this happen. I have seen no interest shown here from the Moderators in making this an issue for FIREHOUSE to attempt to get nationwide statistics on. I think that would be the best FIRST step in the process...

    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

  16. #41
    smokeeater51
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Exclamation

    Greetings from New Hampsha'. Here it is red, or red/white. Roof mount or dash, wig wags and sirens are all acceptable, however, it is up to the local law enforcement and fire chief. As I posted in one of the other forum rooms concerning the same issue, all of the whirlygigs and other attention getters that we vollies put on our vehicles are just "courtesy" lights. I cannot stress this enough. No matter who you are, where you are, or what the situation is, the actions that you take reflect on the ENTIRE firefighting community, ESPECIALLY the volunteer community. Whether the call is for a structure fire, or a cat in a tree, we are all required to respond with due regard. Joe Public is not required by law to pull over and stop for volunteers responding to the station for a call. If the call you are responding to is not a life threatening call, don't risk the lives of innocent people just so you can make the first rig out. Obey all stop signs, speed limits, and traffic lights. Don't let the red lightitis disease take over. We as volunteers are responsible for our actions at all times, both on and off the fireground. If you have a light and/or plate on your vehicle, it is going to attract attention at all times, so be professional at all times. It reflects back on your fire department and the fire service as a whole. This is a very sensitive issue with departments all over the country, mostly because of liability. There is a similar topic in the "meet and greet" forum room under "dash lights", check it out.
    Just one more thing, If while responding to the station for a call, the person in front of you is "courteous" enough to pull over, be sure to extend a wave of thanks, it'll go a long way.

    Take care, stay safe, and stay low.

    Lieutenant M. Spinney
    Rollinsford Fire & Rescue

  17. #42
    Eng 48
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    In N.J. it is a blue light, 50 c.p. or less (yeah right) mounted in center of roof or in front of A post.
    You must have a permit to operate, and can operate in a "reasonable response area."
    You ARE considered an emergency vehicle but people ignore it any way.
    YOU MUST OBEY ALL TRAFFIC LAWS! The only people allowed to speed, blow lights and stop signs, etc. is the POST OFFICE. No lie...check it out yourself.
    Some towns, the Police are very understanding and as long as your not driving without regard for safety they'll let you slide. Some places, I've been stopped just for having it in my window to see if it's legal (I have a permit but it is technically mounted illegally).
    Chiefs can have red lights and sirens and also need a permit.
    I'd be happy if we could use sirens just to get peoples attention. I've seen in Galls they have a "horn" that resembles the horn tone on electronic sirens. I guess this is as close as we can legally get to it though.
    When I respond from home I rarely use my light anyway because I only live a block from the firehouse. All it will take is for the right person to ask "Why did it take so long?"

    ------------------
    Be safe everyone!

  18. #43
    SRFD1604
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Talking

    In Missouri it is Blue lights with siren, when the light is on the siren must be on.

    When I was on a dept in KY it was red lights with siren and same law if light is on so must the siren.


  19. #44
    ENGINE18-3
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Yup all thart about the blue lights in NJ was correct but the rules are gererally not followed. But in the "other" state I spend time in , Oklahoma no emergency lights of any sort are allowed on POVs

    ------------------
    FF Greg Grudzinski
    Oaklyn Fire Dept.
    Station 18-3

  20. #45
    rojaig
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    Weyburn, Saskatchewan, Canada
    I called the Highway traffic board and asked them for some clarification - NOTHING is approved.

    I use my 4 way flashers and head lights I have a fire plate on the front and a MC in the window (driver side front. There was supposed to be a meeting with the chiefs and the govenment this year but I have heard no updates.

    It would be nice to have an NFPA standard or some reg body provide some guidance to the local hwy traffic people. We respond in our own cars right to the fire (in town) and to the hall for rescue and out of town stuff Heck we have a northamerican free trade agreement and can't get a Vol vehicle light code standardized - what gives

    Stay safe - live long

  21. #46
    Capt.GPR
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    New York State-
    FF - Blue Lights/No Siren
    Chief Officers - Red Lights/With Sirens

    EMS - Green Lights/No Sirens
    EMS Officers - Red Lights/With Sirens

  22. #47
    ff emt-p bleve
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Post

    I HAVE THIS PROBLEM WITH MY BAR LIGHT ON MY SUNBIRD. WHEN I TURN IT ON MY EMERGENCY LIGHTS THE CAR TURNS AROUND AN AROUND.DO YOU THINK MY LIGHTS TO BIG! All in fun!!!!!!

    KY-RED FIRE / AMBULANCE
    BLUE OR RED POLICE
    YELLOW/GREEN- DOT/HIGHWAY SAFETY
    PURPLE RAIN PURPLE RAIN.

    [This message has been edited by ff emt-p bleve (edited October 06, 2000).]

  23. #48
    Dr. Law
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Wink

    Hey ff-emt-p bleve.
    Try mounting it vertically! If that fails, try mounting it lengthwise.

  24. #49
    emt786
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Lightbulb

    here in West Virginia F.F./EMS are red lights and siren. Siren must be activated if red lights are on.Anyone over the age of 18 can have a red light and siren permit,which has to be signed by the Sheriff and EMS or F.F. chief, then sent to the State O.E.S. office then that member is sent a window sticker for Vehicle. We also have EMS license plates, in order to get them u must be a EMT, as far as the F.F. plates, not sure what qualifications are there to get license plate

    ------------------

    911,what is your emergency

  25. #50
    MetalMedic
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Arrow

    You all might want to take a look in the FIREFIGHTER FORUM, this debate is taking form there now. A forum member is advocating not letting any volunteers have lights. His solution is to staff all the fire stations... as I told him, when he can figure out how all the comunities with volunteers can pay the salaries to staff the trucks, I would be more than happy to take the lights from the volunteers.... At any rate, check it out, I might need some "mutual aid" in there!

    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.
    HazardAce likes this.

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