1. #1
    Dalma
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    Question Small departments.. do you have a dedicated RIT team?

    We are a small department with about 20 members. Do you have a predetermined RIT team or do you assign them on scene?

    Are all members trained in confined space rescues, breaching and shoring techniques?

    I'm curious about how small departments handle this.

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  2. #2
    esvfdfirefighter
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    We are a department with about 35 active members, but we do not have a dedicated R.I.T., so we usually just use the mutual aid depts that respond in with us. On most structure fires we have a 2-4 dept response depending on which area it is in so the last dept in can act as the R.I.T.

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    Tom Pysh
    President/Lt38-1
    Ellsworth/Somerset V.F.D.
    www.geocities.com/esvfd3870

  3. #3
    BayRidge60
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    Cool

    In this part of the country we call them FAST teams. My company is about 45 members, we don't have "dedicated" members of a FAST team. When we have a structure fire, we call mutual aid for a FAST team. When we are called for mutual aid for a FAST team, the team will be the first five qualified interior firefighters on the truck plus an officer if one is available.

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    Glenn Ralston
    Firefighter/EMT-D
    Bay Ridge Fire-Rescue
    byrdg60@netscape.net

  4. #4
    FFTrainer
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    We do have members specifically trained to be RIT team members however we do not use them on our own fires. We run the team mutual aid to surrounding towns and in turn they provide the service for us when the job is in our district.

  5. #5
    Bob Snyder
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    Initial response on structure calls is a 3-company response. Upon report of a working fire, second-due rescue (first-due rescue is in the initial 3 companies) is dispatched to be the RIT team on scene, along with EMS to standby with an ALS unit.

  6. #6
    firefighter26
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    Exclamation

    Dalma, I believe that we have already discovered that our departments are almost identical.
    So, I will share with you how we do things. We follow WCB regulation 31.23, secton 4. It says:

    "A suitably equipped rescue team of at least 2 firefighters must be established on the scene before sending in a second entry team and not more than 10 minutes after the initial attack."

    What this means, is that if you send in an attack team, a RIT team (or FAST team) must be established within 10 minutes and before a second team allowed to enter.
    How we run, is that if the 10 minute mark comes up and a RIT team is not established, the attack team is to break off and egress from the building. In our situation, this works very well as by the 10 minute mark most of our firefighters are on scene and/or mutial aid is on its way. Ten minutes should be enough time for the attack team to locate and knock down a fire in most residential buildings (if they are only attacking and not doing a room by room search). Most Commercial buildings are, however, much different.

    I hope that helps.....



    [This message has been edited by firefighter26 (edited 01-30-2001).]

  7. #7
    Dalmatian90
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    Cool

    On interior firefights, there is always a second line pulled and staffed -- a backup team or in modern nomenclature an "Initial RIT." They're also the next hose in and/or the next team to rotate in.

    At the Officer-In-Charge's discretion, we can call the RIT crew from the neighboring town -- their a group of firefighters from four departments that train together in RIT functions. See http://www.geocities.com/dalmation90...infieldRIT.htm for a news article I archived about them.


  8. #8
    URSULAFORHAN
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    We have about 20 vollies and a paid chief. Our vollies are divided into "interior" and "exterior" ffs, depending on whether or not they have passed the physical agility test. We assign two interior ffs when we arrive at a fire: if there is a life safety issue, then they will enter without the RIT team. Otherwise, they stay out. We get mutual aid for confined space-type events, though.

  9. #9
    Bobby Hunter
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    We have the ambulance or medic unit crew be the RIT or 2 out until the next arriving unit arrives. My dept has 5 or 6 paid on hand 7 days a week so most of the time the next in company or volunteers that take the next out engine take this roll. If its a major fire where you'll be there for awhile, every 15-20 minutes the RIT team will be changed.

  10. #10
    ghettofire79
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    In our company we do not have a RIT Team we are assigned jobs when we get there. But we do have confined space training and other types of rescue training.

  11. #11
    chief462
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    if it is a confermed structure fire , we call in a mutual aid co as our rit team.
    we only use the co.s that we know are trained in rit. we also try not to use one of our first in mutual aid co's.

    asst. chief kevin smith

  12. #12
    FaxmanEDM
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    No, we don't have a dedicated RIT team. We will special call a station for RIT if needed. The only problem with that is, the RIT team almost always gets rotated into one of the interior crews because we are in need of fresh manpower. Then one of your crew fresh out of rehab takes over RIT. Its not the most ideal situation, but when faced with manpower problems, it works.

    ------------------
    Eric Minnich, FF/EMT
    Neffs Volunteer Fire Co.
    Neffs, Pennsylvania

    "Leather Forever"

  13. #13
    WFD56
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    We are a rural dept of about 30 members and our RIT is basically mutual aid. If we have a structure fire we call a mutal aid dept to be the RIT, and vicea versa, if a nieghboring company has a fire they might call us as a RIT. The first people(properly trained, which is most people 2+ years on) that respond to the house go out as RIT, usually about 4-6 depending). Our response to our nieghboring 4 or 5 depts call for a RIT is generally bordering 5-10 minutes, dependent upon location of the call.

  14. #14
    FF_ONG
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    In our department we will respond to most fires with a mutual aid. We respond on scene with the first arriving units and set up a two in, attack team, and a two out, backup team, per policy for out area. We also have an oncoming unit take up the spot of RIT. Since we usually have at leats four on an engine in response to a fire, the two in two out policy makes it easy to forgo a RIT team for the time being. The backup team will have a hoseline, tools and the like ready to do backup, overhaul or whatever tasks. They can in effect step up and do a RIT style operation if something happens before the teams that will be assigned to RIT arrive.

    Play nice, stay safe

  15. #15
    canman
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    We have 15 members and everyone is trained in Rit, depending on the size of the alarm and how many members show up determines whether we use our own people for Rit or the mutual aid companies.

  16. #16
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    I don't think that we really ustilize a RIT team but I know that NFPA says we are suppose to, we are working on sitting up one, I know when we are at drill and sometimes at night we do have RIT ready but during the day is just not possible.

  17. #17
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    We are just starting to see it come around in our area. We have a couple people with the inital training class, but we need more to develop a dedicated team for our own department and for mutual-aid calls.
    Some units within the county have mutual-aid RIT teams and they have trained togehter and from what I hear it is going o.k. for them in that area.
    My concern, as it is for most people is knowing that we need the training and we need to develop the program, but again not having the needed funds to do it the right way. Granted having something is better then having nothing, but it also can be very dangerous.
    My other concern is this. How much training is there available and how can you get the whole dang thing started?

    Keep doing it for the right reasons!!!!!!!!!

  18. #18
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    Our dept is training for RIT right now, but it will be used for mutual aid to other depts in the county. We have an automatic mutual aid agreement with a neighboring dept. If we run into a situation that requires RIT then we would notify them and have them set up the RIT. We have about 16 members and about 6 of them will be RIT Trained.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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  19. #19
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    How do any departments operate without a RIC Team S.O.P.? Isnt that an NFPA standard? I cannot believe anyone would operate a fireground anywhere in the Country, especially in Maryland, without a dedicated RIC team. You are flirting with disaster. Even if your SOP does not permit for interior attack, having a RIC team ready in case of structural collapse is necessary. Who is gonna rescue the rescuer if you get trapped?

  20. #20
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    We are also a small 30 member department, we dont have a RIT program set up at this time. The neighboring paid city fire department has trained RIT engine and rescue companys we can call in for mutual aid to fill this role if we feel its needed. RIT personal, I feel need to be your best trained and experienced FF's, but with being a small department with limited staffing we need these experienced firefighters to put the fire out, we dont have the staffing to have these members standing by to fill the RIT role. We do plan on teaching all our members this summer, techniques from the "saving our own" firefighter self rescue program, we feel at least this is a step in the right direction to increase the safety of our volunteer personal.

    Chief 730
    Washington Twp. VFD
    Toledo, Ohio
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    Last edited by WTFD730; 03-31-2002 at 11:28 AM.

  21. #21
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    Default RIT Teams

    We are a small department in Central New Jersey. We have a county wide standard for RIT/FAST teams. In our department we make FAST training part of everyones training and also have automatic dispatches for FAST assignments upon notification of a working structure fire.

  22. #22
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    The IC designates a unit to be RIC/RIT/FAST on the fireground from avalible personnel on scene.
    Member IACOJ & IACOJ EMS Bureau
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    As always these are strictly my own opinions and views

  23. #23
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    Chiefs Standing Orders out here say that there must be 4 firefighters on scene before commencing interior attack, which usually translates to 2 people doing the attack and everyone else having other tasks to do. I am yet to see two people waiting outside with scba's on their back incase **** happens and a firefighter needs rescuing. You mention RIT out here and you just get blank looks, even when operating at/inside large structures. Unfortunately I can't see anything changing until we lose a firefighter or two at a structure fire. Sad really.
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

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  24. #24
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    Our first alarm is a district response (4 stations) and the squad whose local the fire is in. The second alarm covers 2 of the stations, brings the other 2 squads from the district, and brings our mutual aid FAST team (highly trained) and they usually bring their squad. The station that our FAST team comes out of is very small but they are very highly trained. They run FAST team assignments with their rescue truck. They usually have to put a cover in their station on any prolonged call because their station is so small.

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