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  1. #81
    Forum Member EngineCO38's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    7am, Saturday, Oct. 9th, 1958. We were 2nd due on a reported house Fire. Saw the Smoke as we pulled out of our station. 2.5 story ballon Frame. well involved, Someone put Gasoline in the Kerosene heater.......
    really pushed the horses to get to that one eh?

    My first call was an EMS run. Elderly subject fallen in their home w/ minor injuries requiring transport. Was still just a First Responder fresh out of High School. Had been on the Dept. for a week. Not before that day had I seen someone so grateful to see a group of people. I remember the patient referring to us as her Angels.

    My second call, the patient was less grateful for our presence. LE had to help us with that one.
    Opinions expressed by myself here are just that, mine. And not that of ANY organization or service I am affiliated with.


  2. #82
    Forum Member Chewy911's Avatar
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    13years old and MY first call (or at least i thought it was) was a weekly pager test. everyone knows how that works, your tones then two others following....yea i was almost in my gear before they annouced no alarm a pager test. but then my first actually call was a simple rubbish pile.
    Fire scenes: A well organized cluster F......
    These are my veiws and opinions.....Im just saying

  3. #83
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    5 college girls rolled thier car on I-86..... of course I got stuck directing traffic....... there was no entrapment all the girls were RMA's more of a close one lane till the tow truck gets here......

  4. #84
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    i im new here... my first call was a car vs simi the driver of the car didnt make it. found out that the driver of the car was my wives cousin. the simi tipped over in the ditch and the cattle got out..

  5. #85
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    My first fire call was a one acre grass fire.

    My first EMS call was a single vehicle rollover with 6 people inside and 5 were ejected. All of them lived but it was a difficult run.
    FF II, EMT, Fire Instructor I, Fire Officer I

  6. #86
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    Car fire in the rain in a pasture at 2am. While rolling up the hoses, a mayday was issued by a department across the county line so we boogied over, rolled up just as they were bringing the homeowner out of the house so burned his arm fell off as they put him on the stretcher. We ask what happened and was told that he had got out easy but decided that he needed his stuff out of the house and ran back in. The chief on scene was so shocked he couldn't do anything but call mayday because he didn't have the personnel to go get him. After about 10 minutes they got the manpower there and found him about 8 feet in the door. He lived for about 20 days. Strange thing is the almost same thing happened to my father-in-law on his first call about a year before. A 19 yr old ran back in to get his "boxes" before the FD got there to keep him out. That kid didn't make it to the hospital.

  7. #87
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    My first call was a mva roll over on the interstate with entrapment after that i was hooked 10 years later i still love it!!!!!

  8. #88
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    This is really silly, but I can't remember. And it was only this past summer that I joined. I think it may have been a false alarm. No! It was a rollover, and I put someone else's pants on. Yes, how could I forget that humiliation?

  9. #89
    Forum Member Brick3633's Avatar
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    ahhh..first call..back when I was 14, my dad was on the fire department and I was very interested myself..so they had got dispatched for a brush fire..he for some reason decided to take me along and i've been hooked ever since..it was a pretty basic brush fire but I thought it was cool **** lol
    "First In, Last Out"

  10. #90
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    40 acre brush fire, 8 departments....I enjoy brush fires, but not when its 90+ degrees outside....lol

  11. #91
    Forum Member ChathamVFD9921's Avatar
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    Drowing.

    Popped the hymen good

  12. #92
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    First call was a structure fire in an attached garage. It happened during my first training and by the time I knew what the heck was going on all the rigs were out the door. The only way I made it to scene was my assistant chief was driving passed the station and noticed me standing on the apron in full gear, helmet strapped on tight. Needless to say about all I did was roll hose.

  13. #93
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    My first actual fire call after training was to my old trailer park where I got to flip off the manager who'd had me evicted under false pretenses(I'd ran off some gang friends of his),but didn't do much else after I'd started dragging LDH from the back instead of using the roll on the passenger side right by the water intake manifold.
    I did get on tv that night when we did takeup.My boss saw me rolling hoses and said that he'd figured out why I took so long at lunch that day.

    First EMS call where I did more than clear a path through furniture was to an adult store that also offered "massages".
    The customer had had a heart attack in the room.He was butt nekkid,the girl was butt nekkid and yougly enough to make a freight train take a dirt road.
    There weren't any lights beyond the tv set which was showing a-uh- biology movie,that's it- a biology film on reproduction.It was,of course the one day I happened to leave my flashlight on the coffeetable when I left the house that morning.
    The Chief had to straddle this guy to do the chest compressions and I couldn't find the O2 wrench to save my life,so we ventilated with room air to no avail.Never did get a pulse or a "Shock Advised" message from the AED.
    The next guy to arrive was this former Explorer who'd just turned 18 and became "burnable",so with all of my 8 months seniority on the department,I told him to go get a light from the utility truck.
    He couldn't keep the light focused on what Chief was doing,because he'd never seen such movies in his life.(No wonder when he acknowledged the call,his mother immediately came on the air and told him to stay in the truck)
    We were loading him into the ambulance when the manager of the place came out and just threw his clothes into the back and shut the door in order to hurry us out of there.The S.O. was en route and we figured that she thought it would have been easier to deny that there was a problem if he wasn't still there when the cops showed up.
    Like I have long said,the best part of being a firefighter is that you know more than what happens as reported by the evening news.The bad part of it is that you either cannot talk about or you shouldn't talk about what you see that the news didn't cover.
    Last edited by doughesson; 02-23-2011 at 01:49 PM.

  14. #94
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    My first call was a Pole/Line Fire. I was 17 years old and a Junior in High School. For what ever reason after school football practice ended fairly early that evening so I thought I would run by the firehouse. I had only been a member for a month or so and had been issued bunker gear only a few days before...No Radio or Pager. I pulled into the station and saw one of our Captains (who was pretty much the only person I really knew) getting his gear on. I asked what kind of call we had, he told me, and advised me to get on the engine. Well I figured since I was new I wouldn't be doing anything and didn't even bother getting my gear on. Once he saw me in the rear open cab with no gear he very strongly, yet effectively instructed me to put my gear on. More people rolled in and I was placed in the middle of the bench seat up front right under the air horn chain...mistake (I found out I really liked the sound of the horns on that old truck and also found out it didn't build air so well). We ended up rolling out with 6 people for a pole fire. We're lucky to get 6 people for a structure fire these days. Anyways, got on scene, fire was out and there was nothing else to be done. It may have been nothing but I will never forget it.

  15. #95
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    My first call was about 3 weeks after I had completed my Firefighter Section One Course. It was a Residential Structure Fire, 1 story wood frame dwelling with an attic. Being that I was only a Junior and My dad is Assistant chief, I rode with him on second out engine. When we arrived, we caught the Hydrant on the way in. A senior FF and I caught it with 5in LDH and laid in about 80yds. When we arrived in scene there was heavy smoke showing from all sides, and heavy flames showing from the C side. The attack team advanced through the front door with a 2 1/2in line, the fire was in the rear in the kitchen/dining room. The main fire was knocked down within minutes, but it had unknowingly extended into the attic area. As they were checking for hot spots, it caught back up and the attic soon became fully involved. However, they managed to get it under control again within about 3 minutes. Once the IDLH enviornment had been eliminated, My dad specially accompanied me in and let me mop up and do some salvage work. I thought that was the best thing ever back then. Now I know that it was nothing. I turn 18 in 7 months and I cant wait until I can fight my first full fledged fire! I just like that my department actually includes the juniors, so long as they have atleast section 1, haz-mat awareness, and cpr first-aid, do some things on the fireground that do not in any way involve an IDLH enviornment. It really keeps us Juniors interested!

  16. #96
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    When I started, there was no training requirement. My first call was in long boots, 3/4 length rubber coat and an MSA plastic helmet. Red Ball gloves were the order of the day, and you used the ones stuffed in the pockets of the coat you grabbed of the rack. It was a mutual aid response to a 3 story wooden Grange Hall about 10 miles into another fire co's area. I along with a couple other rookies was sent tnto the attic portion to look for fire extension. No BA and you were observed by the chief who was trying to see how well you could eat smoke. We've come a loooong way babie! In case you are wondering... October 25, 1968.

  17. #97
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    Just had mine. We were doing some training at our substation when we just barely heard the tone go off due to us having our engine on and hoses blasting into our drop tank so we rushed off to the call (about 5 miles away) and it turns out it was just a smoke detector false alarm... Not very exciting, but still fun...

  18. #98
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    My first call I learned some very important lessons.
    1. The conditions of the call can change at a moments notice.
    2. The plan rarely survives more than the first couple seconds.
    3. You must be able to think outside the box in this job.
    4. The most valuable asset on the fireground is your team mates, whether they be firefighters, emts or leo's learning to work well with others will allow you to accomplish things you never could on your own.
    5. Park where it's safe and walk in if you have to, regardless of how far it is.

    It was snowing out, highway deparment got caught by surprise so road conditions were deteriating rapidly. We were paged for an MVA, vehicle had slid off the road, driver was unable to climb out due to position of vehicle. It was only a few miles from my house. I left the house on mediocre road conditions, got the the main road which was completely clear, drove about a mile to the road where the call was to find a sheet of ice covering the entire road about an inch or more thick.

    I should have parked at the end of the road and hiked it in. The road was just too bad but I decided to drive in. I got to the top of a large hill and at the top of the other side I could see numerous cars stopped/stuck in the road. Thinking that must be the location of the call I started down. I got to the bottom with the vehicle facing at about a 45 degree angle to my direction of travel and managed to get most of the way up the other side before i was forced to stop due to other vehicles blocking my path.

    No other firefighters on scene I got out, introduced myself and asked where the vehicle with the trapped driver was.

    "There are vehicles stuck all over the road" was the reply.
    "I see that but where's the one where the driver is stuck inside"
    "Oh that's back down at the bottom of the hill".

    I made my way on foot back down the hill looking off the steep sides of the road until i saw a car about 20 feet down the embankment laying more or less on it's side up against a tree with a young lady hanging out the passenger side window.

    She was ok but was wearing shoes that she just was not able to climb out of the ditch with.

    About this time the ambulance rolls up and after a quick assessment the EMT's pull out rope, we lower one down the embankment and together we help the lady out of the vehicle. Quick, easy, good... then it went to crap.

    Right as the young lady was reaching the top of the hill my chief calls in that he's about 1/2 mile up the road and has just witnessed a woman slip on the ice, she's dislocated her kneecap and medics are needed. The ambulance goes to turn around and drops it's rear tires off the road (Luckily in a spot where the ditch was only about 18 inches deep). It's stuck , not moving. There are MVAs all over the county (Hundreds reported that night) so getting another ambulance right away isn't happening. This is reported to dispatch, I'm brand new and at this point just don't know what to do.

    Luckily a few mintues later I see one of the other firefighters from my department come over the top of the hill on foot, go straight to the ambulance and grab a backboard and turn around going the other direction. I fall into step beside him and arrive at the secondary scene to find that in the absence of a backboard or other standard tool to get the patient off the ice, the chief somehow came up with a door which the patient is laid on and she is swaddled in blankets the chief keeps in his truck.. I stand back while the others get the patient onto the backboard.

    Dispatch is called to check on the eta for another medic unit to transport the patient, there is no eta at this time. Time to adapt and overcome again, we start asking bystanders for permission to shelter the patient in someones home and immediately someone volunteers their home. We gather around and begin carrying the patient across this 'Skating rink' of a street and manage to get her indoors to wait for the medics. They arrive, on foot, about 15 minutes later. The road is impassible and their ambulance is parked a little farther down the road than the first one.

    They do a quick patient assessment, the patient is loaded onto the cot and we begin the long, slow process of moving the patient along these icy roads to get her to the ambulance. We man the cot with as many people as possible due to the fact that it's going to be going up and down icy hills and it's not a question of IF someone will slip and fall but who and how often.

    The cot is so crowded I can't even fit in to get a hand on it so instead I walked ahead checking for especially slick spots or any other hazards in the road.

    We managed to get the patient loaded in the ambulance with only 1 slip and fall and no additional injuries. 2 slipped and fell on the way back to their vehicles again no injuries and I had to wait for a salt truck to come and salt the roads for the ambulance so I could get my now stuck truck out.

    I can't think of a better introduction, I learned very quickly that things go from quick and easy to all sorts of crap in an instant.

    Stay Safe out there.

  19. #99
    MembersZone Subscriber ffscm72's Avatar
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    I was 16 y/o & responded to a child hit by MV. Unfortunately the child did not survive. But that was my first Fire/EMS call. First fire only was trash fire. Nothing exciting but I was excited non the less.
    "Courage is the resistance to fear, the mastery of fear, not the lack of fear." Mark Twain
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." Uknown

  20. #100
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    my first call was a CO call where I sat on the truck until we got recalled. yep.
    Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

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