Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34
  1. #1
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    450

    Default Do you run tankers in villages?

    This is for more small communites that have tankers. Do you run tankers in your village or mostly out in farm country and far from a hydrant? My department always frowned upon using the tanker in the middle of town up until a few days ago when somebody did against this unwritten rule, had the tanker at the house had a line off and put out the fire before even a engine got there. So now the tanker has been being used for village fires. Do you use yours?
    Firefighter/EMT Mitch Cowen
    Hose Co. 1 1st Lieutenant
    Randolph Fire Co. Inc


  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Yes we do use a tanker/tender in town-if it is a large fire. We will set up the appratus so the tanker is connected to the hydrant, then flow water into the tank and pump from the tank down the street to a pumper that is located at the scene, this way if the situation calls for more water than the hydrant can supply we have a 5000 gal. buffer to work with.
    I don't get paid-the hours are terrible-but I'm doing what I enjoy, and that's good enough for me!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    UP TO MY NECK AND SINKING FAST
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Yes we do use tankers in the village limits. The rule of thumb is if we can not hook up to the hydrant with the 25' of 5" soft suction we go to the tanker shuttle. One of the tankers is a pumper tanker and we use it to attack or tender depending on the situation. It does depend on the situation if you have a lot of 5" hose then that is safer than a shuttle, if not the shuttle is the way to go. As far as attacking the fire with a tanker, If it is a pumper tanker this is a good Idea because 1800-4000 gallons gives you the stay power no matter where you are in town or in the rural areas. The only consideration is to be sure that your pump is rated at 150psi for the flow you need(ours is 500 on the pumper tanker) and as always be safe.

    D308

  4. #4
    IACOJ Agitator Adze39's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    In a van down by the CT River!
    Posts
    2,771

    Default

    Yes, we use our tanker in our hydranted areas. More times that not, it is pumping the hydrant. However, there have been many times it has been used as the attack piece.
    IACOJ Agitator
    Fightin' Da Man Since '78!

  5. #5
    Forum Member MetalMedic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    The Home of Smucker's Jelly
    Posts
    1,266

    Default

    So how did the tanker get to the fire before the engine????

    Our department does not run the tanker in the city, but the department I was on previously did to certain areas where the water supply was questionable. At that time, there were still wooden water lines in some parts of the city!!!

    d308.. you are saying that if a hydrant is over 25 feet from the engine, you will not lay a 5" supply line to the hydrant???
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    NorthEast Paid on Call
    Posts
    139

    Default

    Our 3000 gallon pumper tanker has evolved into the first attack unit in the hydranted area. The pumper has become second due and will lay in from a hydrant.

    It seems ***-backwards but how many fires aren't knocked down with less than 3000 gallons? Since we have always had the second due lay in there's also more of a comfort factor that there won't be a problem with water supply when we switch from tank to hydrant during initial attack.

    There's been some talk about rethinking this when we get our new pumper but I actually think it works very well.
    _________DILLIGAF

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Egremont, Massachusettes
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Our 2500 gall tanker goes anywhere our enigines do (space is a factor in some driveways, but it fits down all roads). Our town does not have pressurized hydrants, just draft hydrants so the tanker is a vital piece on our dept.
    HELL YEAH!!!
    The comments made by me are just that. Not of the Fire dept or Ambulance squad I am on.

  8. #8
    IACOJ Agitator Adze39's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    In a van down by the CT River!
    Posts
    2,771

    Default

    > So how did the tanker get to the fire before the engine????

    Simple, engines were already committed elsewhere.
    IACOJ Agitator
    Fightin' Da Man Since '78!

  9. #9
    Forum Member MetalMedic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    The Home of Smucker's Jelly
    Posts
    1,266

    Default

    Originally posted by Adze:
    > So how did the tanker get to the fire before the engine????

    Simple, engines were already committed elsewhere.
    I guess you folks do it a little different out east.. if we have our engines committed, we call in a mutual aid engine to stand-in until we get one free.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    93

    Default

    Our tanker always runs second due to any building fire, in or out of the hydrant district. Theory being, the tanker only needs 1 man to operate, the first engine gets there with 7, the tanker driver can set up a supply line to the lead pumper and the second due pumper has pleanty of thime to hit the hydrant, charge the line and get set up. Because here in volly land even with great manpower you still don't know how soon your 2nd due engine will be behind the first.


    -Nick

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    UP TO MY NECK AND SINKING FAST
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Metal Medic, in one way yes if it is more than 25' from the hydrant we will not lay a 5" line. The reason is we have a 5" 25' soft suction hose, and the hose bed is made up of 1200' of 3" hose. If we had more 5" hose we then would use the hose lay from the hydrant were we have 6" our larger mains and the tanker shuttle from hydrants with 6" mains in the parts of town where we have 4" mains. Also we have one and will be getting another pumper tanker. These units are equipt to handle tanker or pumper operations. If the pumper is committed then the pumper tanker can run as a engine or if the pumper is there first then the unit runs as a second pumper or tanker which ever we need more. In the rural areas where there is no hydrants then the pumper stays in town and can fill tankers if needed and the pumper/tanker handles the engine operations at the fire. It is nice to have 2000+ on the attack piece it gives you a lot more time to get the water supply started in the rural areas. Hope this clears up the misuderstanding on our situation.

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber TLFD40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    148

    Default

    No. We only get a tanker M/A if we are outside the village and there is no water source. When our tanker is ready, i can only see it being used outside the village. Stay safe.
    BE ALERT AND STAY ALIVE
    ASST CHIEF
    TLVFD, NY

  13. #13
    IACOJ Agitator Adze39's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    In a van down by the CT River!
    Posts
    2,771

    Default

    Metal...our tanker could be classified as an engine tank, but it is not. It actually even won a trophy for best engine tank at a parade by state judges...anywho...

    If our engine tanks and our tanker are out of the firehouse and totally committed to a scene, then we have anotehr company cover our station.
    IACOJ Agitator
    Fightin' Da Man Since '78!

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    West Oneonta,NY 13861
    Posts
    137

    Default

    What hydrants. Yes we run our tanker in village as we do not have the luxury of hydrants.

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Berks County, PA
    Posts
    629

    Default

    In our mutual aid setup, residential and non-high-hazard run cards in our area (which is entirely hydranted) call for a 3-station response. Response order from the three stations, respectively, are:

    57: Telesquirt, Ladder, Engine
    42: Tanker-Pumper, Engine, Tanker-Pumper, Squad
    67: Rescue-Engine, Rescue, Engine, Squad

    So, suppose that the three first-out units arrive in order of distance (as they usually do), then we'd have the telesquirt set up for attack, the first tanker-pumper set up to nurse the squirt, and the first engine to lay from the squirt to the nearest usable hydrant (approx. 1/3 of our hydrants flow under 500 g.p.m., so the closest might not be the best). This means that, between the squirt & the tanker-pumper, there's 3,900 gals. of water available immediately, which gives us 10.3 minutes of water, with all four 1.75" lines off the squirt flowing 95 g.p.m. (or, 8.1 minutes for four at 120 g.p.m., or 20.5 minutes for two flowing 95 g.p.m., etc., etc.). The engine should be able to set up supply in much less than that, and ample other units should be on scene before that runs out (including another 3,500 gal tanker-pumper). In this way, we can get a rapid attack going with sufficient water to last, with a margin for safety, until an outside supply (hydrant or static) is established. In practical terms, fires can often be controlled or extinguished by the squirt & a tanker-pumper, without ever actually flowing anything through LDH from an engine.

    Response and pre-plans are different on high-hazards (churches, industrial buildings), so what I wrote above doesn't apply in those cases. In the other areas (67's & 42's), the response order is a little different, based on the area. 67's area has an abundance of good hydrants, so it's set up engine-ladder-engine for the first three due. 42's area is a mix of hydranted, dry-hydranted, and really-out-there-near-nothing, so it gets a little more complicated (and I'm tired of typing).

    Anyway, you get the idea and I hope this helps you out.

  16. #16
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    450

    Default

    The reason the tanker arrived on scene before the engine did has a couple of factors. For one the driver was a little slow to get there, and then had to wait for a crew anywyas. And we run out of 2 comapnies, Hose 1 & 2. Tanker is from 2 and engine is from 1, the guy who drove the tanker lives about a mile up from hose 2 so he got it first and was gone. The 2 halls make a good difference. everybody is assigned to either hose 1 or 2 and thats decided where you live.
    Firefighter/EMT Mitch Cowen
    Hose Co. 1 1st Lieutenant
    Randolph Fire Co. Inc

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Upstate NY/West Central IN
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Our tanker rolls on all fire calls, inside or outside town limits. Those hydrants can be a little iffy at times.
    Visit www.newmarketfire.org!

    "People generally quarrel because they cannot argue." - G.K. Chesterton

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    west Michigan, USA
    Posts
    59

    Default

    In the hydranted parts of the village, we do NOT respond tankers. However, there are some areas that do not have hydrants, in these areas tankers are sent with the initial alarms. The villages around us that do not have hydrants always send their tankers to fire alarms in the village limits.
    Be Safe
    GOD BLESS the U.S.A. and FDNY
    Dan

  19. #19
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    west Michigan, USA
    Posts
    59

    Default



    [ 10-25-2001: Message edited by: chief4102 ]
    Be Safe
    GOD BLESS the U.S.A. and FDNY
    Dan

  20. #20
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    924

    Default

    our tanker goes everywhere. why i dont know. im not on the dept yet but i hope to be soon. i have a feeling it is because our pumper tankers are kind of old so we need the saftey factor of it being there.
    "Let's Roll." Todd Beamer 9/11 first soldier in the war on terror

    "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. And to the republic for which it stands ONE NATION UNDER GOD indivisible,with liberty, and justice for all.

    I.A.C.O.J. Probie and darn proud of it.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts