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Thread: info needed!!

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Default info needed!!

    Hi, I hope everyone is well. I just recently suffured an off the job lower back injury.I was wandered if anyone had any fitness tips to help me rebuild the strength in my lower back. thanking you in advance for your help. Lets keep our thoughts and prayers with the families off FDNY this holiday season.
    Thank you,
    ectruckee


  2. #2
    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    ECTruckie...was the injury a muscle pull or did it involve the spinal column?

    If it was muscular, you can start by going to your doctor and have him/her refer you to physical therapy and following their recommendations. I threw my back out at a fire a few years ago while humping hose up a flight of stairs. I didn't really feel it until after the fire (adrenaline rush!). The fire happened on my last duty tour and I had 4 days off to recuperate. I wenrt to my physician, who refered me to PT. It was great and after a few sessions I felt a whole lot better. Once you are back up and running (pardon the pun), start a fitness program. Mike Stefano's "Firefighters Workout Book" or Bill Phillips' "Body for Life" are two excellent resources for starting and maintaining a fitness regimen.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  3. #3
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    Lightbulb

    "Good mornings" are a good exercise to build strength in your lower back. Start lightly however and build up to greater resistance over time.

    Deadlifts are a great 'total body' workout that gives your back a good workout. I wouldn't recommend those for someone just coming off an injury though. Give it some time before you move up to that level and make sure you wear a belt.

    Don't forget to work your abdominals as well. Keeping your abs strong and tight will help to balance any muscular inequities that your back may have. Also try to keep the gut off if you have one. Carrying that extra weight around the midsection can be hel* on the lower back.

    Physical therapy is great way to heal up the injury that you had. If it was a herniated disc, don't be in too much of a hurry to get back into the swing of things. If it was a strain, just take it easy and let it heal. The last thing you need is sciatica wreaking havoc with your body. As far as chiropractors go...I have my doubts.

    Gonzo's right. Those two books will give you a good foundation for a fitness program.

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    The causes of sciatica are many but it most commonly results from either a herniated disk or spinal stenosis. Depending on the cause, the pain of acute sciatica usually goes away on its own in four to eight weeks or so.A thorough diagnostic work-up will reveal the cause.Fortunately, sciatica typically resolves without the need for surgery in about 4-6 weeks. However, if any neurologic deficits develop, such as a foot drop or changes in normal bowel and/or bladder functions, then immediate surgery is usually performed.For acute sciatica without any neurologic deficit, the use of epidural steroid injections can be very beneficial in resolving the discomfort.
    For those with sciatic pain due to a herniated disc lasting longer than 6 weeks, surgery has been shown to be superior than non-operative treatment. For those with sciatica or neurogenic claudications lasting longer than 12 weeks, surgery has been shown to be ore effective than non-operative treatment.When surgery is required there are several procedures that may be of benefit. These range from an open laminectomy or laminotomy or even a fusion.

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