Thread: Line packs

  1. #1
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    Question Line packs

    I am looking to get a new line pack / web gear system. I was curious as to what other people use, pros and cons. I will be doing a little of everything from engine to line work.

    Thanks,
    RJ

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    I have been using the Ruffian pack most hotshot crews in the nation use them, one of the good things about the packs is that they will custom make the pack for you so if your a bigger or a small guy just let them know.

    More for Engine style work I would have to say the La Rescue pack I have found to be the best.
    But if your working more on a engine crew you never know how long the fire will last so I have seen more slugs *engine guys* going with the Ruffian style just dont pack as much inside of it, and it still lets you carry a **** pump on your back really easy, but yet wont smash your lunch.

    Ruffian's number is 800-607-7772 let them know a hotshot sent you

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    Default line pack help

    Greetings,
    I was faced with the same problem last year you experiencing. Hopefully this information Iím posting will be a great help in your selection. You must identify what things are important to you like: price, comfort, ease in shelter deployment, and quality of materials and construction. I ended up looking at many line packs online and have supplied them below. But my final purchase was the N-350 Wilderness Attack Pack System by Nimrod Pack Systems of Cashmere, Washington.
    Iíve spent two seasons on a 20-person hand crew and last season on an interagency Engine and as an Engine Boss. Iím also a volunteer for my County Sheriffís Office Search and Rescue, which suits my needs for a hasty search as well as a recreation pack.
    This pack is great cause you can carry every thing you need with comfort. And if your working by an engine or a close area you can detach your main pack and still keep your fire shelter and yet have a smaller storage compartment.
    It takes under a minute to attach/detach the main compartment to the pack. Also the pack has plenty of zipping pockets and several internal pockets to keep things organized. Customer Service with Nimrod has been great. I ended up talking with La Grande IHC Superintendent this summer. He was quite interested with my pack and asked if I could come to his crew so they could look at it after shift one night. They had an older model from nimrod that needed to be replaced. I know of other crews that use them and are pleased with them as well.
    Thielsen was another pack that I looked at as well. They are similar to the Nimrod, good construction, my old crew Superintendent and saw boss had them. The new ones are also detachable and can carry quite a load.
    Eagle Gear is not a bad choice also. They can carry quite a load with these. My old crew pack was the same design.
    The pack shack through Mittenmountain.com is decent economy packs quite popular for that reason.
    Sierra seem to have a decent design but not familiar with them.
    The Nimrod web site has some good tips for choosing a pack.

    Hopefully these web sites will be helpful in your search for a pack.

    http://www.nimrodpacks.com/pack_fit_tips.htm
    http://www.nimrodpacks.com/
    http://www.thielsen.net/
    http://www.eaglegear.com/
    http://www.sierrafiregear.com/
    http://www.mittenmountain.com/
    http://www.benchmarkmfg.com/

    Iíve included the bencmarkmfg.com since they have the FSS pack for a comparison.

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    Here are acouple more:
    www.bagmaker.com
    and pgbag by Harold Dramstad in Missula Mt.
    Onelick

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    I had to buy all of my own equipment, all I use is good ole Army surplus LBE, 4 canteens and a "butt pack"
    Steve
    Proud member of the IACOJ
    SUA SPONTE
    "I've got no respect for any young man who won't join the colors."
    ~Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, CSA

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    Check out what's available at:

    http://www.firecache.com/

    I've heard nothing but good reports regarding the Nimrod gear. Whatever you decide....make sure it's durable. It's going to go through many cycles of wetting/drying. Don't be afraid to spend a little more....you're going to depend on it to keep your stuff contained and organized.
    Last edited by NJFFSA16; 03-27-2002 at 01:06 PM.

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    Heres another source for good packs... Have had one for the
    past couple of years and love it

    http://www.gear911.com/page1.htm

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    Default LA Rescue

    I have used LA Rescue Bags for over 12 years and I have yet to have any problems ... maybe just the opposite, I have to find "excuses" to buy a new bag !! Great quality and super ideas when creating gear bags. Keep up the good work and I will continue to buy them.

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    Another vote for Nimrod.

    After several years of trying different packs, I finally found the Nimrod was the most comfortable. It depends a lot on what you are going to be doing. We were on an engine, but 90% of the time we could not drive to the fire so we hiked or flew, we had to be prepared with enough food/water to stay out all night. The nimrod was big enough to hold anything I wanted, and rode well.
    "Hard work spotlights the character of people: some turn up their sleeves, some turn up their noses, and some don't turn up at all"

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    Default Wolf Pack

    You should also check out wolfpack gear www.wolfpackgear.com they have some good products. The owner is also a firefighter so he understands what the needs of other firefighters are.

    SMK

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    Check out www.truenorthgear.com. They are all CDF compliant. They also have lifetime warranties. The adjustments on the straps are infinite to fit your bod size. Email me directly and I can get you a demo to try if you would like. jason@jbrescue.com
    Jason Brooks
    IAFF Local 2388
    IACOJ

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    Has True North sent the gear to be tested by anyone? Can they put the certs on the True North web page if this is so?

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    Quote Originally Posted by smketer View Post
    Has True North sent the gear to be tested by anyone? Can they put the certs on the True North web page if this is so?
    What sort of testing or certifications are you looking for?
    Jason Brooks
    IAFF Local 2388
    IACOJ

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    Default do your research

    I have worked in wildland firefighting for six years now, on both engines and hand crews, and have changed packs several times. The most important part is to find one that fits you. Several factors to consider is the amount of gear that you need to carry, distance, and your frame. Obviously for engines you may not need to carry too much stuff, as for a crew- the more stuff you carry the more comfortable you'll be. I have tried the standard FSS gear, then changed to Ranger packs and found them to be too narrow in the shoulders for me. I have since tried Theilsen, wolfpack gear, and true north. I personnally prefer the theilsen pack due to wolfpack pulling too far back and distorting the belt, and true north's fire shelter hits my legs. I am not saying these packs might not work for you, but try to find someone that has a style you like and talk with them. Possibly even try it on and see how you like it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbrescue View Post
    What sort of testing or certifications are you looking for?
    True North is in the process of getting all packs third party NFPA certified at this time. The NFPA standard is in the works and they are working on making sure that all packs are third party ceritified. As if right now, the only change looks like the amount of reflective material. That is already being changed.
    Jason Brooks
    IAFF Local 2388
    IACOJ

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    Default True North - Fire Shelter Case

    Quote Originally Posted by Crwb4104 View Post
    I have worked in wildland firefighting for six years now, on both engines and hand crews, and have changed packs several times. The most important part is to find one that fits you. Several factors to consider is the amount of gear that you need to carry, distance, and your frame. Obviously for engines you may not need to carry too much stuff, as for a crew- the more stuff you carry the more comfortable you'll be. I have tried the standard FSS gear, then changed to Ranger packs and found them to be too narrow in the shoulders for me. I have since tried Theilsen, wolfpack gear, and true north. I personnally prefer the theilsen pack due to wolfpack pulling too far back and distorting the belt, and true north's fire shelter hits my legs. I am not saying these packs might not work for you, but try to find someone that has a style you like and talk with them. Possibly even try it on and see how you like it.
    True North has made changes to its packs in 2006 to accommodate the larger and heavier New Generation Fire Shelter Case. Specifically, we've added a cinch down strap to lock the shelter into place away from the users legs. Give me a call 800-873-5725 x174 to arrange for a demo. Hopefully you'll find the shelter no longer has some swing to it and therefore not hitting your legs.
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