1. #1
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    Bones42's Avatar
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    Default ART Lite Vehicle Stabilization Kit

    Our current method of stabilizing cars on their side is by using winches and tow trucks. It works, but is "shaky" at best. We are looking into ART Lite products from AirShore Incorporated. Basically a small set of manual jacks for stabilization, not lifting.

    Anyone out there have any experience with these products, or others similar?

  2. #2
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    It would be wise to check out the Tele-Cribbing from Rescue 42.

    www.rescue42.com

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
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    We use paratech struts and the zmag ground pads with 4x4's. Both have their places and work great!.. For added stability we usually hook up the winch cable or a comealong and just pull the slack out of the cable. Sets the car nice on the struts and no stabilization is required on the shiny side.

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    Thanks for the replies. The Rescue42 stuff looks pretty good and is a few (but not much) dollars cheaper. I also looked at the Zmag stuff, but with space being short, was looking for more collapsable items instead of storing 4x4's.

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    My department tried out several systems and ended up with 2 of the long Rescue 42 struts per rig(instead of 1 long/1 short). They've worked great and we keep them mounted and assembled on a swing out tool board. Kit comes with a cluster hook assembly we also use with our chains and come-along.
    I got to play with the Zmag ones after the fact and really liked them, EASY to use. Strap stays rolled up in the base when not in use. You do need room for (2) 5footers and (2) 3footers. Zmag has an extender that lets you combine the 2 lengths into one. Price was very inexpensive as well. The Capabear claws were a similar design and worked well too.
    We tried the ARTlite and several guys didn't like the multiple pins, swiveling piece, etc. That's more of a training issue, what are you comfy with? They came in a kit bag so that you could store them broken down into sections.
    Our neighbors to the north have the paratech struts and are very happy with them.

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    I agree that some of the tensioned buttress systems require a bit of what I call "some assembly required" to place them in service. Be very aware of this. Like the posting above said, some fire crews may not like having to do all this work at a crash scene.

    Consider systems that can be as pre-assembled as possible and have few things that can go wrong with them.

    Watch out for small buckles, thin straps, small handles, loose parts, small pins, etc... things that would make a guy take their gloves off or could jam, fail, or be forgotten at the worst time.

    Yes, training is an important part of learning to work with any tool but it just seems that some stabilization system designs make you have to do so much extra work that they defeat the purpose in getting them in the first place.

    As you shop for a new buttress system, pay attention to the 'fast attack' capability of the tool. What you feel will work for your crews first time, every time at the two o-clock in the morning rescue call is the system you should consider.

    Not all are created equal and as you can see, price isn't the whole story either.

    Ron Moore
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  7. #7
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    Check out Res-Q-Jack from Cepco tools.

  8. #8
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    Also check out Nightmare Struts, from Junkyard Dog Industries. We played with a set, and found them quick and easy to adjust, compact to store, and had web straps and a picket attached. One dealer in PA is:

    www.glickfire.com/Rescue/struts.htm
    R.A. Ricciuti
    Mt. Lebanon Fire Department

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