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  1. #1
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    Default Tricks of the Trade

    Being a relatively new firefighter, I love to collect the little bits of knowledge and tips that alot of older and wiser firefighters. I love getting the tricks like the golf balls and the bent nails. Please share your trick of the trade with me and all of the other rookies and probies.

    steve


  2. #2
    Forum Member dfd3dfd3's Avatar
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    I'll give you some advice I got from an old, now retired Captain. Know the Basics. Being open to learnind ways to do something new and better is good, but knowing and being able to do all the basics in your sleep will take you much farther than a golf ball or some other "trick" will. There are no shortcuts on the fireground, fire has been put out the same way for hundereds of years and that by good solid tactics. And that all rests on basics. Now there are basic info and tips to learn, but these must fit into sound tactics. Personally i think golf balls is sily and not good basic tacicts. Be able to do everything in Essentials in your sleep and read some good procedures from a big city like FDNY or Chicago and youll be a sound firefighter.
    Last edited by dfd3dfd3; 03-07-2002 at 08:33 PM.

  3. #3
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    dfd3,
    i agree whole heartedly with your advice, but i think your missing the purpose of the post. it is relatively easy to sit down and read the essentials, there are classes, and study guides to help you. yes knowledge and tactics are THE most important tool a firefighter can have. the purpose of this thread is just to little tidbits that aren't the most necessary things, but stuff that may make your job a liitle easier. when i see an older firefighter carrying something or doing something unusual, i like to know why. who knows, it maybe something i should be doing. thats all not all that serious of a thread. but i do agree and heed your advice. thanks for responding. by the way, where can i read FDNY, Chicago, etc. procedures?


    steve

  4. #4
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    Hopefully this is the sort of thing you're looking for.

    Get to know your air pack's workings in and out, and get so familiar with it that you can get the thing on and be ready to breath air in 45 seconds. On a fire scene you've got enough to think about; this will eliminate worrying about your best friend (the SCBA).

    Get into the habit of wearing your hood on all calls. If you don't need it you can always take it off, but it'll become automatic that you put it on (same can be said for SCBA). I don't know how you store your gear, but if your helmet hangs from a hook, then keep the hood stuffed behind the faceshield; then make sure it's the second thing you put on after your bunkers. That way it'll always be under your coat like it should be.

    Carry some sort of tool--you don't have to become a walking tool cart, but something like a screwdriver, pliers, or that sort of thing. Thousands of uses, on and off the fire ground. If you live somewhere that gets cold, I'd advise carrying some chemical handwarmers. Get a spare pair of gloves, that way when the first pair gets wet and frozen, you can have a second pair while you hang up the others to dry.

    When you drive around your town in your POV, pay attention to street signs, and house numbers. YOu'd be surprised at how many streets you didn't know in your own town, even if you were raised there and thought you knew your way around. Happened to me and several people I know; We knew our way around without realizing we didn't know all the street NAMES.

    That's all I can think of off the top of my head; hope they help.

    Stay safe.
    I can think of no more stirring symbol of man's humanity to man than a fire engine.

    --Kurt Vonnegut

  5. #5
    Forum Member dfd3dfd3's Avatar
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    Here is a link were you can print off some procedures from FDNY

    http://sageauthoring.com/fdny/fdny1.html#Ladder

    The procedure called Ladder Company operations at Tenements is their "Ladders 3" and supposedly there basic maual for ladder operations. Im starting to read that one, ive read all the engine comp operations and they were really good.

  6. #6
    Forum Member dfd3dfd3's Avatar
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    Ok, ill give you two tips. To dry out gloves use an aluminum vegetable can with the botom cut out, stick the cans in your gloves and theyll dry out better.

    Also, when you are making some door wedges, this might be hard to explain, but cut two slots into the middle of the wedge wide enough for a typical door width. This way instead of putting a wedge under a door where it can get kicked out, you place the wedge above the hinge, sliding the wedge on its side until you get to the place you cut out then turn the wedge so its flat. If you cut it right, this should lock the wedge in place and you wont have to worry about your wedge getting kicked out by some dumb truckie

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