1. #1
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    Post Retired Apparatus

    Curious to hear any unique stories about old retired trucks,
    i.e. sold in auction, given away, hauled away, etc.
    We sold a 1968? ALF engine in a city auction, got $2200. Sat on local used car lot for awhile and disappeared.
    Gave a 1982 Ford FMC engine to a neighboring fire training field for a stationery pumper. Get it out of town, it's yours. Still sitting at the training field.
    Just recently gave a 2nd 1982 Ford FMC engine to a town in Mexico. We left it with them at the river. Good luck. It had been sitting for about 8-9 years. It made the 200 mile trip. Probably hadn't been driven 50 miles since retired in 93. They were on cloud 9 to get it.

  2. #2
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    -we had a 1947 segrave tiller ladder sold to nova scotia canada, then bought back by a group of guys at our fire house
    -then a 67 mack tiller ladder sold to schriners in arizona for a parade car
    -then we had a 80's something oshkosh tower ladder sit in an old friendly's ( ice cream/burger place ) parking lot with a for sale sign on it when we got our new spartan LTI tower ladder, it was turned in as a trade in when we got our new air/utility truck
    " truck till the casket drops "

    www.lynbrookfd.org

    My views and opinions do not represent the views and standards of the Department or Company that I belong to.

  3. #3
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    Dalmatian90's Avatar
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    We sold our 1947 Seagrave 65' Ladder in 1990 when we bought the '76 Mack 100'.

    The collector who bought it is now under Superfund cleanup and will probably see his truck collection sold -- we've authorized the re-purchase the Seagrave for what we sold it for if it becomes available/goes to auction. Keeping our fingers crossed, since it would be a neat project truck -- and you don't see too many antique ladders compared to antique pumpers.

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up

    Jhill, my department had a 1965 International cab forward pumper with an A.L.F. body. It was a hoot! the transmission had no syncros and it was double clutch in every gear. The dog house for the motor was almost shoulder high and gear shift came out on top of the dog house. You had to drive it at least once a week just to be decent at it. Some people just refused to drive it. It pumped well and the body was strong but by 1985 it had outlived it's usefulness. Shortly after receiving a Pierce Arrow Pumper we sold the 65 to a department in the valley and they still use it to this day with one modification. The front of the cab has a very distint grill and the positioning of the headlights resembles a face. Well they made a large tongue out of cardboard and secured it to the bottom of the radiator intake grill. At least they have a sense of humor.

  5. #5
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    If anyone can answer this question then let me knwo also. I know Mark at Helping Our Own would love to find a place like that.

    code_blue81
    Jeremy Culver
    IACOJ Bureau of EMS

    These views are my own and do not represent the views or opinions of anyambulance service that I am affiliated with.

    Help our fellow firefighters.
    www.helpingourown.com
    "Firefighters Helping Firefighters"

  6. #6
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    Default Boy i feel dumb now

    I should learn to just keep one window open. that last reply was for a different post I had open in a different window.

    What I was going to ask is: When you replace/retire a pumper/ tanker/ whatever do you think about donating it to a needy dept. that could us it for front-line use for them. I know, I know: these depts are small and don't get but like 30-40 calls per year, but they still do the same as the rest of us. If anyone has any apparatus that is being taken out of service soon please contact me about donating it. The FIRE Act grants are here (like I needed to tell anyone) and I know many of you are hoping to get the cash for some new trucks and what-not. If you have any questions about the liability concerning this feel free to email me to discuss it..or to just chew the fat and all.

    code_blue81
    Jeremy Culver
    IACOJ Bureau of EMS

    These views are my own and do not represent the views or opinions of anyambulance service that I am affiliated with.

    Help our fellow firefighters.
    www.helpingourown.com
    "Firefighters Helping Firefighters"

  7. #7
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    Pretty funny that you sold what we are still using. We have a 69, and 69 ALF pumpers. What can you say we are stuck in the 60"s
    Stay Safe/Stay Low Go 8 Car Go

  8. #8
    Malcolm
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    Cool

    BF443 - You talking about your 1965 International makes me smile. One of our two engines is a 1967 International front mount 750gpm pumper. It also has a non-synchronized transmission. All I can say is that it is a good thing the gears in that tranny are tough. Got so messed up with it one day, had to come to a complete stop and start over with first gear. Luckily it was only a grass fire. It is a tough truck and will pump night and day, but if you don't drive it very often, it will mess with your head. To this day have trouble downshifting it. It still rolls on all major incidents.
    Stay safe,
    Malcolm Cunningham - Hardin Fire Protection District

  9. #9
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    Post

    I know what you mean about shifting those gears.
    Our 75 Mack CR685 Engine is a hoot to drive with
    its 5 spd trans. I can shift it w/out the clutch.
    Most of the guys double clutch it. I hold my breath
    when one of the rookies drives it and grinds the gears.
    It has absolutely no leg room at all. My knee just
    about hits the steering wheel to let the clutch out
    to get going. The clutch pedal has to come completely
    up before it'll get moving.
    It is a great truck. There are some rumors floating
    around that it'll be sold next year when we get out
    2nd Quantum. I believe it is worth more to us then
    we'll get at auction. One of our 93 Sutphen's will
    replace it in Reserve status. The Mack is a better
    truck then the Sutphens are.

  10. #10
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    Clutch comes all the way up befpre it moves?Either you're about to lose a clutch or your repair shop doesn't know how to adjust it.685 Macks should have full engagement at between 1.5 to 2.0 inches OFF the floor.Any more than that indicate end of useful life or adjustment required.Minus cowboys, clutch should be good for 300,000 to 750,000 mi.T.C.

  11. #11

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    Default Old Trucks, huh

    Ladies and Gentalmen,
    My VFB in Penna has in service a 59 Ford Tanker, a 70 American LaFRANCE Pumper and a 1980 Ford Pumper, yeat to be in service. No hydrents we have 1,500 gals of water then we are screwed till the 2nd in Company comes in. www.trailsend.org will show u our currently used rigs. If any Company is getting rid of there old Tankers, Pumpers, Tanker/pumper please E-Mail me, at lease a 1980. We are trying to up-date alittle at a time. Thanks.
    Backdraft_Firefighter2001@yahoo.com

    Stay Safe
    Dan M. B.
    NJ State Firefighter 1
    Passaic County Fire Acadamy
    Class of 2001
    "Let's Not Forget Our Fallen Heroes"
    9-11-01

  12. #12
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    Talking

    About 15 years ago Spring Mill Fire Company (my first company) donated their 1968 Maixium S (short nose) open cab pumper (45-22)to a company along the Delaware River in upstate Pennsylvania. It was given to them on the premise that when they could replace it they would give it back.

    Memorial Day weekend of 2000 my father-in-law and I went up to get her and bring her home. It was one of the best days I've had as firefighter. She maxed out at 52.5 mph but made the ride back to suburban Philadelphia with absolutely no problems. Still pumps and pulls a prime, but I don't know if she could pump for over 12 hours like the September 1978 Whitemarsh Apartment fire.

    She's been repainted and ready to go as a parade piece now and if they need her for a field fire they just might use her again.
    Steve Dragon
    FFII, Fire Instructor II, Fire Officer I, Fire Appartus Driver Operator Certified
    Volunteers are never "off duty".
    http://www.bufd7.org

  13. #13
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    Default Old trucks

    Interesting topic.Here in Australia my service has a twenty year replacement policy unless your truck is in above average coondition in that case you can apply for a 5 yr extension. Most people are glad to get rid of their trucks after twenty years due to the fact the trucks we use are Hino cab chassis(Jap)and very primitive looking fire bodies that come with three lockers! After twenty years these viechles are so stuffed that they are constantly in the shop for repairs ,and due to funding problems the "powers to be"tried to put 10 ton on an 8 ton chassis so we have steering problems, stuffed suspension ,blown diffs etc etc etc and most of them are only ten yrs old! Another reason for this problem is the fact that it was up to local councils to fund the local fire service so if there is only 1000 people in the district that doesn't leave much money! The service come up with a basic truck to get people out of trouble but they cut to many corners which they are now paying for.Some people( including my brigade) were more fortunate and could afford Fords Volvo and International which are still going strong as well as custom bodies. In 1999 the government introduced central funding which has improved the funding 100% now the priority is to get the areas that had poor funding but high risks better trucks and once this is done we can start to give state of the art appliances to brigades in urban built up areas with hazmat and rcr roles.Unfourtunately we don't have a custom cab/chassis supplier like you do but La France has entered the market recently but we will see what happens.

  14. #14
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    Default Old trucks

    Interesting topic.Here in Australia my service has a twenty year replacement policy unless your truck is in above average coondition in that case you can apply for a 5 yr extension. Most people are glad to get rid of their trucks after twenty years due to the fact the trucks we use are Hino cab chassis(Jap)and very primitive looking fire bodies that come with three lockers! After twenty years these viechles are so stuffed that they are constantly in the shop for repairs ,and due to funding problems the "powers to be"tried to put 10 ton on an 8 ton chassis so we have steering problems, stuffed suspension ,blown diffs etc etc etc and most of them are only ten yrs old! Another reason for this problem is the fact that it was up to local councils to fund the local fire service so if there is only 1000 people in the district that doesn't leave much money! The service come up with a basic truck to get people out of trouble but they cut to many corners which they are now paying for.Some people( including my brigade) were more fortunate and could afford Fords Volvo and International which are still going strong as well as custom bodies. In 1999 the government introduced central funding which has improved the funding 100% now the priority is to get the areas that had poor funding but high risks better trucks and once this is done we can start to give state of the art appliances to brigades in urban built up areas with hazmat and rcr roles.Unfourtunately we don't have a custom cab/chassis supplier like you do but La France has entered the market recently but we will see what happens.
    You can checkout our service at www.fire-brigade.asn.au
    What was said above is only my personel thoughts based on the facts.

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