1. #1
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    Angry Cartoonist at it again

    The mutt Ted Rall is at it again, folks. Apparently, this piece of canine excrement felt the backlash of FDNY people, and other FF from his last tasteless cartoon, and wanted the last word. Check out the article at: http://www.nydailynews.com/2002-03-1...t/a-144246.asp
    Let's light up the 'net again. Hopefully, we can get to him. I would like to see him in the unemployment office.

    With thanks to E ngine Lt, here are the links again:
    Link #1 The Artist Ted Rall's email:

    Email:chet@rall.com

    Link #2 His publisher:

    Universal Press Syndicate
    Kathie Kerr, Director of Communications
    Phone: (816) 360-6945
    Email:kkerr@amuniversal.com

    Link #3 His Publishers PIO:

    Sue Roush
    Universal Press Syndicate
    4520 Main Street
    Kansas City MO 64111
    (800) 255-6734
    Email:sroush@uexpress.com

    Link #4
    The Washington Post
    Feedback
    Email: webnews@washingtonpost.com

    Link #5
    The New York Times (I'm Ashamed)
    To the editor:
    letters@nytimes.com

    Link #6
    The Village Voice:
    Tell us what you think. editor@villagevoice.com
    Link #7
    The people who publish his books:
    NBM publishing
    555 8th ave., Ste.1202
    New York, NY 10018
    Tel: (212)643-5407 FAX: (212)643-1545, 1-800-886-1223
    info@nbmpub.com
    "Illigitimi Non Carborundum"

    "The views expressed by me are solely my own, and in no way reflect the views of any organization which I belong to."

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    I guess it's time to take this out of the gutter and into the spotlight. That is beyond me and I am going to call on the IAFF to begin an immediate boycot of any and all publications who carry this "Artist's" work.

    It seems a nickle, dime email campaign has only inspired this "Artist" to attack our ranks. Call your unions, notify your brothers and sisters. Don't mail the "Artist", mail people who matter.

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    Default Gear Magazine

    Let's not forget this article points out that the Cartoon appears in the April edition of Gear Magazine. Their website is http://www.gearmagazine.com but I'm having trouble connecting - if anyone can get more info on an email address for that please post it!
    Susan Lounsbury
    Winston-Salem Rescue Squad
    Griffith Volunteer FD

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    This is nothing new for scumbag Rall. He has raised the ire of my fellow conservatives for awhile. This cartoon is an abomination and reflects on his moral deficits. All firefighters, indeed all Americans should be outraged. The brothers in the city do not deserve to have a cartoonist casting aspursions formed from his own ultra liberal mind. He is a cancer on society with the ability to draw and an audience that eats it up in spades. Note the Washington Post, the New York times, bastions of the left who thinklessly publish this under the premise that it is "interesting and newsworthy". How would Mr. Rall like it if someone drew a caricature of him sodomizing someone and put text up that said "Hey Ted, almost through?"
    I am infuriated and have my family banging out the email to interested parties.

    I am ashamed that what we call civilized has reached a point of mocking disaster victims.

    God Bless America and damn Ted Rall to hell.

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    its gonna come around and bite him. when his house/building/box whatever he lives in burns down, i think it would be funny with him saying "do something you guys" and the firefighters just sit there and laugh. this guy needs a life, seriously...

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    Statements like WFDjr1's post are not called for, not even in a funny way. They are the kind of things that bums like Rall will use in the future. It should not, even in the slightest way, be mentioned of not acting when we are needed.

    Let's not stoop to his level.

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    After emailing all the rags that were previously posted by E-Lt. none of them responded back. Apparently, we had some impact it's just to bad that it obivously wasn't enough. So time for the blanket email to everyone and eliminate this individual's attention for the spotlight. Only one problem with sending him to the un-employment line is then we have to support this low life.

    Keep posting the rags that continue to print his crap and I will conitnue to email them.

    GOD Bless FDNY and ALL of the Lost Brother's and their families.

    Dave
    Firefighter
    FTM, PTB, RFB
    Last edited by FF.1205; 03-15-2002 at 05:59 PM.

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    You got it Bones,

    But since Rall lives in NYC, his home is safe from the ravages of fire. Most wouldn't even know he lived there, not that it would matter.
    Of course once his home and family were safe, then during the overhaul I would love to find some of the sketches of his latest works about us and hand them to him myself. Saying something like, "I don't like what you do but it's my job to protect it and you."

    Then of course we could go back in and coverup the windows, seal the roof and see that no further damage was caused.

    Yeah, that would feel good.

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    Can anybody find a link that shows the cartoon a little bigger so I can read it?
    Bryan Beall
    Silver City, Oklahoma USA

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    hey, i was just making a reference about how he portrays firefighters and thier widows as wanting money, and then they're not there when he needs them, his comments have came around to him. what goes around, comes around. if u dont like what i got to say, then dont read it. its an OPINION, doesnt mean its right, doesnt mean its wrong, but if u dont like it, THEN DONT READ IT! seems some people dont recognize sarcasm anymore...........
    Last edited by WFDjr1; 03-15-2002 at 10:53 PM.
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

    Johnny Greene: 2/3/45-5/2/04
    Forever in our hearts

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    WFD jr,

    Settle down camper. Most of us just know in our heart we would never turn our back when we're needed. When you post in a public forum your words are there for all to see.

    Unfortunatly, some people think the views of one are representitive of all and will use your words to label us all. Bones' response was only saying what I said above. We will fight your fire and protect your life and property, wether we like you or not. It comes with the helmet. In 5 or 10 years you'll feel the same way and probably kick some new kid in the butt for suggesting we do nothing.

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    well it aint my fault, i retaliated with what i thought was necessary, with my opinion, 100% the way i see it, and 100% unchanged, because whats the use of changing something just so somebody else likes it? its just the way i am, ive got a short fuse. BTW, in 5 years, ill barely be 21.............
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

    Johnny Greene: 2/3/45-5/2/04
    Forever in our hearts

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    BTW, in 5 years, ill barely be 21
    That explains a lot son. And those very words are what will keep all of us from being labeled by your opinions. So thanks for saying them.

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    Exclamation

    Hey, just because I'm young, doesn't mean that I'm dumb or anything like that. I'm actually very smart. Don't get me wrong, there's a lot I don't know, and a lot that I never will know. Haven't you heard the saying "To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid"? Has it ever occurred to any of you that maybe, just maybe, if you'd listen to a "youngun", as we're called around here where I'm from, every once in a while, you would see things from our point of view? I'm not trying to be hateful or anything, but just think about it. Therefore, before you go off saying, "All people under so-and-so age are dumb (im not saying you said that)" Why don't you see it from our point of view first. Yeah, you were my age once, and you probably are thinking right now, "Yeah, whats your point?" Well my point is, times change, people change, and before you go off using age as a way to label someone, remember this, many of us younguns are at the point of our life where we are deciding what we want to do with ourselves. Now I could easily say, "Oh, firefighters are biased on age because of this one guy's comment, I don't want to be one of them!" But do I do that? No! Because I've been around long enough to know better.
    Just my 2 cents... Not like they really matter...
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

    Johnny Greene: 2/3/45-5/2/04
    Forever in our hearts

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    "Yeah, you were my age once, and you probably are thinking right now, "Yeah, whats your point?" Well my point is, times change, people change, and before you go off using age as a way to label someone...."


    **sigh**....funny, I do believe those same words came out of my mouth 20 or so years ago......

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    See, my point exactly. When somebody tries to be serious, they get sarcasm in return. As far as I am concerned, I am through with this thread. And seriously doubtful about other things...
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

    Johnny Greene: 2/3/45-5/2/04
    Forever in our hearts

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    NCRSQ751, here is the info that I could come up with for gear magazine. I have never seen a copy of the publication and I could not get the web page to open.

    Guccione Media LLC
    Naomi Middelmann
    450 West 15th St. 5th Fl.
    New York, NY 10011
    Phone: (212) 771 7002
    Fax..: (212) 627 3168
    Email: jbell@digitalconvergence.com


    In the post before when others were talking about this guy I posted his home address and I think his home phone number. What these news papers are doing by printing the cartoons is getting us to buy there news papers, and going to there web pages, but one way you can hurt them is contact the people and companys who advertise in the publications that run his stuff, that will hurt the news papers and magazine because that is how they print the publications.
    And with all of us going to look at it, it only makes the count go up on the web page counter.

    If a firefighter contacts one news paper in there town, and lets them know how they stand I think they will get the message.

    *joke*
    Or next time a fire inspection comes up for a magazine or for a news paper, well lets just hope they dont get too many fine's that it closes the offices down.

    Stay Safe,

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    Hey,
    Ease up on the kid. He was making a joke. It wasn't a funny one, but they can't ALL be home runs, right JR? Heheh...anyway, why doesn't someone draw up a nice cartton about how Ted Rall's mom has been wondering what he's been doing with his life for the last 10 years, or how he uses his artistry to supplment his first income, Master of Ceremonies at a hot gay Strip Club.

    When I saw the first cartoon, I just thought it was a "JR"-style swing and a miss, but now it's obvious he's trying to push an issue. FD widows, and FD in general just isn't FUNNY right now. Someday, you will be able to crack those jokes just like you can crack a joke about the Titanic, but until then, FD jokes are as funny as cancer. So, Captain Cockbag, Ted Rall, maybe you should take your jokes to the Middle East, so you can have a hearty laugh on the FDNY while you set aflame your 4th gasoline soaked American flag of the day. Dick.

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    WFDjr1, I was not being sarcastic. I was making the point that all of us, each and every single one of us on this thread was making the exact same plea at 16, 17, 18, 19 whatever age.
    It's kind of like all those things your parents say and do to you that you swear you will never say/do to your kids........think again!!!!

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    Not only is this jerk Rall attacking firefighters, he has also chosen to attack the military now. He did a cartoon essentially making fun of the latest round of helo crashes that occured, and did a cartoon regarding soldiers over in Afghanistan right now.

    Being a firefighter, I found the cartoons regarding the widows and FDNY despicable, and being the wife of an active-duty service member with 14 yrs in, ready to be deployed at any moment with a fleet hospital, I do not find the military jabs amusing at all. My husband and other men and women of the armed forces are out there fighting for justice for our fallen brothers in NYC,the military members they lost in DC and the civilians that tragically lost their lives.

    This Rall jerk is really taking advantage of his right to free speech and hes ****ing off the wrong people!


    Lady.
    Last edited by lady_in_turnouts; 03-16-2002 at 06:12 PM.
    "Let every nation know..that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, oppose any foe, to assure the survival and the success of liberty"---JFK, Jan.1961

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    Default Real Journalists...

    There were many great, heartfelt op-eds written and many great, heartfelt cartoons drawn in the wake of September 11. This one, by essayist Peggy Noonan, is still one of my favorites. It's classy and passionate and real in a way that Rall's work will never be. Take a read:

    PEGGY NOONAN

    Courage Under Fire
    The 21st century's first war heroes.

    Friday, October 5, 2001 12:01 a.m. EDT

    Forgive me. I'm going to return to a story that has been well documented the past few weeks, and I ask your indulgence. So much has been happening, there are so many things to say, and yet my mind will not leave one thing: the firemen, and what they did.

    Although their heroism has been widely celebrated, I don't think we have quite gotten its meaning, or fully apprehended its dimensions. But what they did that day, on Sept. 11--what the firemen who took those stairs and entered those buildings did--was to enter American history, and Western history. They gave us the kind of story you tell your grandchildren about. I don't think I'll ever get over it, and I don't think my city will either.

    What they did is not a part of the story but the heart of the story.

    Here in my neighborhood in the East 90s many of us now know the names of our firemen and the location of our firehouse. We know how many men we lost (eight). We bring food and gifts and checks and books to the firehouse, we sign big valentines of love, and yet of course none of it is enough or will ever be enough.

    Every day our two great tabloids list the memorials and wakes and funeral services. They do reports: Yesterday at a fireman's funeral they played "Stairway to Heaven." These were the funerals for yesterday:

    Captain Terence Hatton, of Rescue 1--the elite unit that was among the first at the Towers--at 10 a.m. at Saint Patrick's Cathedral on Fifth Avenue.

    Lt Timothy Higgins of Special Operations at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church, on Portion Road in Lake Ronkonkoma, out in Long Island.

    Firefighter Ruben Correa of Engine 74 at Holy Trinity Catholic Church on West 82nd Street, in Manhattan.

    Firefighter Douglas Miller of Rescue 5, at St Joseph's Church on Avenue F in Matamoras, Pa.

    Firefighter Mark Whitford of Engine 23, at St Mary's Church on Goshen Avenue in Washingtonville, N.Y.

    Firefighter Neil Leavy of Engine 217 at Our Lady Queen of Peace, on New Dorp Lane in Staten Island.

    Firefigher John Heffernan of Ladder 11 at Saint Camillus Church in Rockaway, Queens.

    And every day our tabloids run wallet-size pictures of the firemen, with little capsule bios. Firefighter Stephen Siller of Squad 1, for instance, is survived by wife, Sarah, daughters Katherine, Olivia and Genevieve and sons Jake and Stephen, and by brothers Russell, George and Frank, and sisters Mary, Janice and Virginia.

    What the papers are doing--showing you that the fireman had a name and the name had a face and the face had a life--is good. But it of course it is not enough, it can never be enough.

    We all of course know the central fact: There were two big buildings and there were 5,000-plus people and it was 8:48 in the morning on a brilliant blue day. And then 45 minutes later the people and the buildings were gone. They just went away. As I write this almost three weeks later, I actually think: That couldn't be true. But it's true. That is pretty much where New Yorkers are in the grieving process: "That couldn't be true. It's true." Five thousand dead! "That couldn't be true. It's true." And more than 300 firemen dead. Three hundred firemen. This is the part that reorders your mind when you think of it. For most of the 5,000 dead were there--they just happened to be there, in the buildings, at their desks or selling coffee or returning e-mail. But the 300 didn't happen to be there, they went there. In the now-famous phrase, they ran into the burning building and not out of the burning building. They ran up the stairs, not down, they went into it and not out of it. They didn't flee, they charged. It was just before 9 a.m. and the shift was changing, but the outgoing shift raced to the towers and the incoming shift raced with them. That's one reason so many were there so quickly, and the losses were so heavy. Because no one went home. They all came.

    And one after another they slapped on their gear and ran up the stairs. They did this to save lives. Of all the numbers we've learned since Sept. 11, we don't know and will probably never know how many people that day were saved from the flames and collapse. But the number that has been bandied about is 20,000--20,000 who lived because they thought quickly or were lucky or prayed hard or met up with (were carried by, comforted by, dragged by) a fireman.

    I say fireman and not "firefighter." We're all supposed to say firefighter, but they were all men, great men, and fireman is a good word. Firemen put out fires and save people, they take people who can't walk and sling them over their shoulders like a sack of potatoes and take them to safety. That's what they do for a living. You think to yourself: Do we pay them enough? You realize: We couldn't possibly pay them enough. And in any case a career like that is not about money.

    I'm still not getting to the thing I want to say.
    It's that what the New York Fire Department did--what those men did on that brilliant blue day in September--was like D-Day. It was daring and brilliant and brave, and the fact of it--the fact that they did it, charging into harm's way--changed the world we live in. They brought love into a story about hate--for only love will make you enter fire. Talk about your Greatest Generation--the greatest generation is the greatest pieces of any generation, and right now that is: them.

    So it was like D-Day, but it was also like the charge of the Light Brigade. Into the tower of death strode the three hundred. And though we continue to need reporters to tell us all the facts, to find out the stories of what the firemen did in those towers, and though reporters have done a wonderful, profoundly appreciative job of that, what we need most now is different.

    We need a poet. We need a writer of ballads and song to capture what happened there as the big men in big black rubber coats and big boots and hard peaked hats lugged 50 and 100 pounds of gear up into the horror and heat, charging upward, going up so sure, calm and fast--so humorously, some of them, cracking mild jokes--that some of the people on the stairwell next to them, going down, trying to escape, couldn't help but stop and turn and say, "Thank you," and "Be careful, son," and some of them took pictures. I have one. On the day after the horror, when the first photos of what happened inside the towers were posted on the Internet, I went to them. And one was so eloquent--a black-and-white picture that was almost a blur: a big, black-clad back heading upward in the dark, and on his back, in shaky double-vision letters because the person taking the picture was shaking, it said "Byrne."

    Just Byrne. But it suggested to me a world. An Irish kid from Brooklyn, where a lot of the Byrnes settled when they arrived in America. Now he lives maybe on Long Island, in Massapequa or Huntington. Maybe third-generation American, maybe in his 30s, grew up in the '70s when America was getting crazy, but became what his father might have been, maybe was: a fireman. I printed copies of the picture, and my brother found the fireman's face and first name in the paper. His name was Patrick Byrne. He was among the missing. Patrick Byrne was my grandfather's name, and is my cousin's name. I showed it to my son and said, "Never forget this--ever."

    The Light Brigade had Tennyson. It was the middle of the Crimean War and the best of the British light cavalry charged on open terrain in the Battle of Balaclava. Of the 600 men who went in, almost half were killed or wounded, and when England's poet laureate, Alfred Lord Tennyson, learned of it, he turned it into one of the most famous poems of a day when poems were famous:

    Their's not to make reply,
    Their's not to reason why,
    Their's but to do and die:
    Into the valley of Death
    Rode the six hundred.

    Cannon to right of them,
    Cannon to left of them,
    Cannon in front of them
    Volley'd and thunder'd:

    Stormed at with shot and shell,
    Boldly they rode and well,
    Into the jaws of Death,
    Into the mouth of Hell
    Rode the six hundred.

    I don't think young people are taught that poem anymore; it's martial and patriarchal, and even if it weren't it's cornball. But then, if a Hollywood screenwriter five weeks ago wrote a story in which buildings came down and 300 firemen sacrificed their lives to save others, the men at the studios would say: Nah, too cornball. That couldn't be true. But it's true.

    Brave men do brave things. After Sept. 11 a friend of mine said something that startled me with its simple truth. He said, "Everyone died as the person they were." I shook my head. He said, "Everyone died who they were. A guy who ran down quicker than everyone and didn't help anyone--that was him. The guy who ran to get the old lady and was hit by debris--that's who he was. They all died who they were."

    Who were the firemen? The Christian scholar and author Os Guinness said the other night in Manhattan that horror and tragedy crack open the human heart and force the beauty out. It is in terrible times that people with great goodness inside become most themselves. "The real mystery," he added, "is not the mystery of evil but the mystery of goodness." Maybe it's because of that mystery that firemen themselves usually can't tell you why they do what they do. "It's the job," they say, and it is, and it is more than that.

    So: The firemen were rough repositories of grace. They were the goodness that comes out when society is cracked open. They were responsible. They took responsibility under conditions of chaos. They did their job under heavy fire, stood their ground, claimed new ground, moved forward like soldiers against the enemy. They charged.

    There is another great poet and another great charge, Pickett's charge, at Gettysburg. The poet, playwright and historian Stephen Vincent Benet wrote of Pickett and his men in his great poetic epic of the Civil War, "John Brown's Body":

    There was a death-torn mile of broken ground to cross,
    And a low stone wall at the end, and behind it the Second Corps,
    And behind that force another, fresh men who had not fought.
    They started to cross that ground. The guns began to tear them.
    From the hills they say that it seemed more like a sea than a wave,
    A sea continually torn by stones flung out of the sky,
    And yet, as it came, still closing, closing, and rolling on,
    As the moving sea closes over the flaws and rips of the tide.

    But the men would not stop:

    You could mark the path that they took by the dead that they left behind, . . .
    And yet they came on unceasing, the fifteen thousand no more,
    And the blue Virginia flag did not fall, did not fall, did not fall.

    The center line held to the end, he wrote, and didn't break until it wasn't there anymore.

    The firemen were like that. And like the soldiers of old, from Pickett's men through D-Day, they gave us a moment in history that has left us speechless with gratitude and amazement, and maybe relief, too. We still make men like that. We're still making their kind. Then that must be who we are.

    We are entering an epic struggle, and the firemen gave us a great gift when they gave us this knowledge that day. They changed a great deal by being who they were.

    They deserve a poet, and a poem. At the very least a monument. I enjoy the talk about building it bigger, higher, better and maybe we'll do that. But I'm one of those who thinks: Make it a memory. The pieces of the towers that are left, that still stand, look like pieces of a cathedral. Keep some of it. Make it part of a memorial. And at the center of it--not a part of it but at the heart of it--bronze statues of firemen looking up with awe and resolution at what they faced. And have them grabbing their helmets and gear as if they were running toward it, as if they are running in.
    Last edited by BucksEng91; 03-16-2002 at 03:51 PM.
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    The opinions expressed are mine and mine alone (but you can borrow them )and may not reflect those of any organization with which I am associated (but then again, they just may not be thinking clearly).

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    WFDJr1 - I don't have any idea how old you are. That never entered my mind. All I stated was that we need to keep track of what we write here as it is a public forum that lots of unintended visitors can see. No attach on you, just a reminder to all of us. Image is very important for the Fire Service.

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    WFDjr1,
    I have to admit that your comment was uncalled for even though it may have been your honest opinion. You have to understand that in emergency services we have what is referred to as a duty to act. This means that if we get a call we respond and fullfill our tasks no matter if the emergency involves our best friend or our worst enemy.
    I think the reason that some people were upset with your response is because even though it is your opinion, it reflects upon all of us. Often times a rookie or jr will make a thoughtless or immature remark which will affect other firefighters because in public services everything we do is criticized.
    I'm sure all of us are angered over what this person is doing, but there are better ways to deal with the situation than by wishing him harm.
    A few words of advice that I'd give you are
    • Think before you act/write, it may not affect just you
    • Don't be defensive, just sit back and think about it
    • Read forums to see how respected members have a tendency to respond
    • Talk less, Listen more. It really does help.
    Just take this for what it is and think about it. I'm not saying that you are everything that I described, but just think about them. I thought you might like to hear this from someone who is not much older, so age isn't a predjudice among us just a difference in wisdom, which puts us at the lower end
    Stay Safe

    Ryan Dennett
    FF/EMT-I

    -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
    "Some ask why. I answer: I know where I am going when I die, and so I do not fear it. Some people need more time to figure it out. I am that extension. My life for yours."
    Marc 'SkipJack270'

  24. #24
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Drifting on a raft in the Carribean Ocean listening to Buffet.
    Posts
    222

    Default

    This SOB can join that yahoo from the globe and pack his $&*! too and get the F^%$ out OUR country as well!!

  25. #25
    Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Cape St. Claire (Annapolis), MD
    Posts
    50

    Default A Dishonor to all Emergency Services Personell

    After 9/11, most Americans have come to recognize firefighters/EMTs as heroes, but there are still those like Ted Rall who obviously have no consience. How could any human being poke fun at the men and women who serve their communities and their country without ever asking for anything in return. He chose a time at which many people who lost loved ones are still mourning, and he chose the wrong profession to mess with. A group of people who put their lives on the line to save others. Ted Rall poked fun at men and women who are so dedicated to their job that if he were ever in need of fire or ems services, he would have it. My only hope is that the newspapers and magazines have enough sense next time not to publish something so discraceful.

    Megan

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