1. #1
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    Question what will you do??

    hi i just have a cuestion what will you do if there is a tornado in your city and you are not at the fire house, will you just stay at home ot rush to the fire house???

    god bless F.D.N.Y.

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    Default Hmmm...

    That's a tough call, considering I've never experienced a tornado before. We don't really get that sorta thing here in the mountains very often. I would have to say that as soon as I knew my family was safe, I would likely go to the station. Don't know how wise that decision would actually be though...how do you know that your station's not leveled??? I look forward to reading other's opinions, especially those of the older guys that may actually know what SOP's would be in order.

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    We don't get tornados, that amount to anything. WE don't get hurricanes, floods, or earthquakes. So I am nt wasting my time thinking about what I would do.
    Firefighter/EMT Mitch Cowen
    Hose Co. 1 1st Lieutenant
    Randolph Fire Co. Inc

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    Well, I live in tornado alley, so I guess I'll throw in my two cents worth.

    We don't currently have a SOG for severe weather.

    I suspect if a tornado were to touch down in our district, our department would shelter in place--that is, stay where you are until it's over. After the immediate danger is past, hit the road to the station and go from there.

    You don't want to be in a vehicle during a tornado...firetrucks included. Trying to get to the station with a tornado on the ground wouldn't accomplish much anyway--you would still have to wait until it was past before you could go do anything.

    Firehouse had an article about two small departments who had tornados strike their towns in the last issue. You might check it out.
    Bryan Beall
    Silver City, Oklahoma USA

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    mitch_rfd_ny

    We don't get tornados, that amount to anything. WE don't get hurricanes, floods, or earthquakes. So I am nt wasting my time thinking about what I would do.

    Better start thinking about it, NY averages ten or more a year. From 1988 to 1998 it was over thirteen a year - 132 during that period, twenty-five in '92...

    No one is spared from tornados, they can happen anywhere on earth.
    It's only my opinion. I do not speak for any group or organization I belong to or associate with or people I know - especially my employer. If you like it, we can share it, you don't have to give me credit. If you don't, we are allowed to disagree too (but be ready to be challenged, you may be on to something I'm not). That's what makes America great!

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    If there was a tornado, i would stay with my family until it was all over, then i would go down go from there. I would prolly go down to the Station because it is not that far.
    Visit us at http://www.randolphfire.org

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    Default

    Yeah of course, I would go to the firehouse, only if the tornado has past.

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    Back in November I believe it was, we had some really severe weather. We got out of school about 30 minutes early. Myself and a friend went to my house then to his then we went to the station. While we were driving from school to my house then to his there was just a light rain. Then when we were driving to the station it started pouring. But if I was at home I would stay with my family until it was over then head to the station.

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    Actually, I have been in that situation. I was home alone and had just gotten home from work when my pager went off. Since my family was off on vacation, I took main roads to the fire station. Fortunately nothing touched down in our township, but it was close. In my opinion, you should only do what you feel safe doing. If I had actually seen something touch down, I would've been in my basement.
    Big Dawg

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    I don't know, and I dont care. All I do know is, when that does happen IF it ever does, I will know what to do at that moment.
    Nate Breton, Vice President
    Post 333 Salem Fire Rescue

    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the ability to work with fear."

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    Exclamation Mongo has a good point

    You do need to think about this. FF are the first ones called when a tragedy like this occurs. We are toned when there is a Thunderstorm Warning, and often for watches, and go out as storm spotters. Let me tell you, that isn't fun, sitting on a hillside, alone, in the dark, trying to look for funnel clouds, rotation, wall clouds, or other indicators. We leave one person at the station to man the storm siren to give the townspeople at least some warning. But this often isn't time enough. One of the tornados last year with two fatalities was a small town about 20 miles away. The people had no chance or time. That particular tornado was on the ground for something like 30 seconds, and moved through the town in 17 seconds. The damage a tornado can do, in a few short seconds is astounding. But to answer your question, I would prob. either be out in a truck spotting, or at the station already, hitting the siren, and praying.

    Be safe out there
    "Illigitimi Non Carborundum"

    "The views expressed by me are solely my own, and in no way reflect the views of any organization which I belong to."

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    Default thank yuo all!!!

    Thank you for your post reply, i live in dallas tx. and we have been under a tornado warning for 2 days and i just wana know what you ff will do

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    Default WOW!!!

    < POST REMOVED BY WEBTEAM FOR CONTENT >
    It's only my opinion. I do not speak for any group or organization I belong to or associate with or people I know - especially my employer. If you like it, we can share it, you don't have to give me credit. If you don't, we are allowed to disagree too (but be ready to be challenged, you may be on to something I'm not). That's what makes America great!

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    firefighter254

    Seek shelter until the storm passes, then take care of your business that needs handled, then go to the station and take care of other peoples business.
    It's only my opinion. I do not speak for any group or organization I belong to or associate with or people I know - especially my employer. If you like it, we can share it, you don't have to give me credit. If you don't, we are allowed to disagree too (but be ready to be challenged, you may be on to something I'm not). That's what makes America great!

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    Default Been there, made that decision

    The reported tornado was on the far side of the territory, so I decided to go to the station. It is only about a min. and a half from home to the station. We stayed in place there till the initial danger had passed, then hit the road. This was my first and so far my only tornado response. I hope it is my last. This was only a small F1 tornado that did minimal damage, but there were still multiple mobile homes destroyed, downed power lines, a couple of leaking propane tanks, and a damaged tractor trailer truck. Fortunately, no one was injured from the FD or civilian population. One of the biggest problems we had was the hazards created by propane leaks and downed power lines coupled with lots of confused people walking around. I wasn't sure what we would have when I left the house headed to the station, and I didn't magically figure it out when the tones went off.

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    Many firefighters like to think that when the big stuff happens they "will rise to the occasion". In my limited experience thus far in the fire service, I've found that firefighters often instead "fall to their level of training".

    What that means, is if you haven't thought about it, haven't prepared for it, and don't know what to do when the big stuff ISN'T going on, you probably aren't going to know what to do when it hits the fan.

    With severe weather, and specifically tornadoes, there is RARELY more than a couple of minutes of warning before things get very, very bad. Quite frankly, that's not enough time to do much. When a series of tornadoes (including an F-5) tore through Oklahoma in May 1999, cutting a swath from Chickasha to Tulsa (that's about 134 miles in a straight line) the people on the Tulsa end had been watching live TV footage of the devastation in Moore and other cities for AT LEAST an hour or two, knew the storm was coming, and people still weren't prepared.

    So, someone tell me, how are you going to handle the situation? I have lived in Oklahoma my whole life and live with the threat of tornadoes all the time. The area I live in was a small town...until a tornado sucked it up in the 50s. The communities 5 miles south of my house, 10 miles east of my house and 8 southwest of my house have been struck by tornadoes in my lifetime. I have been lucky enough to only SEE an actual tornado ONCE--and you have no idea the pucker-factor that it causes.

    I think this is a great topic, but please understand that a tornado is a force that you have absolutely NO CONTROL over. Even with a major fire, we can (and will) eventually get a handle on it. Bring in enough men and equipment, and we'll kick it's butt. But no one, short of God Himself, can do anything about a tornado.
    Last edited by SilverCity4; 03-31-2002 at 11:29 AM.
    Bryan Beall
    Silver City, Oklahoma USA

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    Listen mongo, tell me the last time you saw a tornado in New Hampshire. Not too many have happened that I know of, and when they have happened there hasn't been much damage at all. Now he was asking what we would do, go to the station or stay home, and I replyied I will know what to do at the moment. Well it's true! If a tornado EVER happened where I lived I don't know what I would do. Really I think it would depend on if it hit my house. Now we do get hurricans, nor'easters and floods, and I know what to do for those, but if a tornado ever happened I wouldnt know, because we havn't been trained in a "tornado" situation. I don't care if you see 5000 of them a year. I wouldn't know and probably never will because they just DONT HAPPEN in New Hampshire. So take your cocky attitude and preach to someone else because you dont know what I would do.
    Nate Breton, Vice President
    Post 333 Salem Fire Rescue

    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the ability to work with fear."

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    Default just don't happen...

    I wouldn't know and probably never will because they just DONT HAPPEN in New Hampshire.

    Just don't happen?

    New Hampshire didn't have 68 tornados between 1950 and 1990?

    There weren't two in 1997 and two more in 1999

    NH didn't have one in 1995 and 1998?

    Did you know that NH Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan states "New Hampshire experiences frequent F1 and F2 tornadic events and has experienced several F3 Tornados with winds of 158 - 206 mph."

    Did you know between 1950 and 1996, every single state in the US, and DC and Puerto Rico have been hit by tornadoes? Can you guess who ain't last on that list...

    You better call and tell all these people they got their data wrong because tornadoes, and I quote, "...just DONT HAPPEN in New Hampshire."

    The sad thing is you don't know what you would do...
    It's only my opinion. I do not speak for any group or organization I belong to or associate with or people I know - especially my employer. If you like it, we can share it, you don't have to give me credit. If you don't, we are allowed to disagree too (but be ready to be challenged, you may be on to something I'm not). That's what makes America great!

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    Default Severe Weather

    Okay....Youve got the severe weather person inside me to pipe up.
    Anywhere can experince a tornado. Anywhere the atmospheric conditions are there, tornadoes can and DO form. Yes, NH has experinced massive torandoes!. You has a part of a communities emergency service should be aware of the hazards posed by severe weather. Now....Tornadoes are NOT the only hazard you should be concerned with. Typical summer time thunderstorms, can often from into a line of storms, called a derecho, a derecho is a very dangerous line of thunderstorms which have damaging straight lined winds. These winds can do damage just as equal to that of a strong tornado. What im getting at is, just because you live in the northeast or in the moutains dosnt mean diddly, where ever the conditoins are right for severe weather it can an and does happen.

    TO further more ignore it and laugh it off, like the public does makes you a potential victim yourself. My suggestion to you folks is simple, contact your local National Weather Service office and ask them about the SKYWARN program, and youd be surprised what the odds of severe weather are in your area. Be wise and dont get caught of guard.

    Jeremy Miller
    Truxton Fire Dept
    SKYWARN SPOTTER NWS BINGHAMTON
    Jeremy Miller
    Truxton Fire Dept

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    In Randolph, we just don't have tornados. You could ask my grnadma, grandpa, who are all over the age of 75 and they will tell ya that during there time, the only tornados Randolph has had is the one the swirl up a little dirt on the side of the road for about 5 seconds. There are areas where tornados just don't happen, and Randolph is one of them. I mean, if you lived in Randolph, you would understand... another thing is is this town is just so boring, and nothing ever happens here. They just don't happen, plain and simple.
    Firefighter/EMT Mitch Cowen
    Hose Co. 1 1st Lieutenant
    Randolph Fire Co. Inc

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    Default

    First, I'll make sure everything is okay at home and that my gf is okay(she means the world to me, ya know?). After that, I'll get about 2 changes of clothes and head off to the firehouse. 2 changes, you ask? Chances are, if there's a 'nado, there might be others, and you might be wearing your gear for an extended period of time or staying overnight at the station. However, the only time I want to stay at the station is if/when I get that stupid immediate family law changed and go paid.
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

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    Default TORNADO WATCH/WARNIG CRITERA

    Okay, here are somethings i wanna get straight.

    TORANDO WATCH: MEANS.... CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE FOR TORANDO DEVELOPMENT IN THE WATCH AREA. PEOPLE IN AND CLOSE TO THE WATCH AREA SHOULD REMAIN ALERT FOR RAPIDLY CHANGING WEATHER CONIDTIONS AND BE PREPARED IN THE EVEN A TORNADO WARNING IS ISSUED. THIS DOES NOT NESSICARLY MEAN A TORNADO WILL OCCUR, BUT THE ATMOSPHERE IS SET UP TO.

    TORNADO WARNING: Means, A tornado has been spotted by trained personnel or indicated by doppler radar. You should move to an interior room or lowest floor of your home or building and get under a stury piece of furnature. This is NOT to be taken lightly folks, you can wind up dead. Dont try to out run a tornado in your car, and DONT for Godsakes hide under an overpass, that places you higher up in the winds, exposing you to flying debires, and you can get sucked out!. You dont believe me?. Ask the people of Moore, Oklahoma and Oklahoma city!.

    People the truth is, weather does what it damn well pleases. You guys gotta wake up and smell the weather....before severe weather season starts here in the northeast.

    If you guys wanna argue or agree email me truxtonfirefighter@yahoo.com

    Jeremy
    Jeremy Miller
    Truxton Fire Dept

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    I am with Mongo here......

    There are many many situations... If you have warning then you do one thing...if it catches you by suprise you do another.

    But your primary concern in either case should be your family.. you are 16, 17, 18 for goodness sake. You have one family. Make sure they are safe.....and.....then go help your department.

    As a junior, cadet, explorer your role in this major disaster is limited. You should be restricted to the station and give duties like helping in the evac center, making sure people have access, food water etc. Help the firefighters by getting equipment in service, making coffee etc... ALL are very important functions.
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
    ------------------------------
    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
    ------------------------------
    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

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