1. #1
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    Question Apparatus Riding Assignments

    How many of your departments use standard riding assignments on your engines & rescues? This seat is the nozzleman, this seat the canman, etc.

    Any tips on helping everyone remember what assignment and tools each seat is responsible for?
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

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    My department tried it at one time. We just had those little labelmaker things on the diamond plate in front of each seat of our open cab pumper. They are still there but no one really goes by them.

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    We use numbers on each seat for the assignment. Detailed cards were attached at each position and training reinforces it until you get to a point where the cards get smaller and become a "bullet" list. Keeping seats similar helps too. Seat 1 is behind the officer on the engine and is nozzle working with the officer inside. Seat 1 on the truck is search and works with the nozzle inside, etc... The driver and seat 2 are the initial FAST and make up the outside team on both the engine and truck.

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    My current dept. doesn't use 'em, when you've only got 3 to an engine somebody has to drive somebody has to be in charge so it follows that the last guy is the nozzle. The last dept. I worked for the truck mainly was the one using assignments just because of a forward thinking officer, but its a beautiful thing to see 5 guys get off a truck and have a nasty complement of wrecking tools at hand without ever getting any orders...How do you remember what to grab? Practice...lots of it
    ...if you put the handline in the right spot, you won't have to jump out the window...
    -Andy "Nozzles", SQ18, 9-11-01

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    My dept, paid on call, has simple rules. First qualified person to the station drives or lets another qualified person drive(their choice), ranking officer or FF rides right seat, the hose assignments are either directed by the officer or worked out in the back by us grunts, depending on the officer. The only other rules are that the highest ranking officer chooses the crew, if more than full, for mutual aid and Emts have priority for spots on the rescue.
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    As always these are strictly my own opinions and views

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    If the engine is full:

    The jumpseat closest to the outside on the passenger's side of the vehicle is the hydrant man. Another guy in the back will help the driver/pump operator get all set up (unless the hydrant man is also able to do this). The officer and the 3rd man in the back will get the line. Then the other two will either hook up with them or grab another line. If the 2nd guy in the back doesn't help out the PO, then he goes on the line with the 3rd guy, under the command of the officer.

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    I think it should be SOP that each position is assigned the same job all the time. Example; on ladder companies the driver is responsible for ladder placement and lighting, OIC takes care of circle check and entry point, third is in charge of forcable entry and 4th is in charge of hook and can. If everyone is trained to do the job for the position they're riding, there will be no confusion. Just a sugestion, it's the way my department does it and it seems to work.
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    Well lets see if I can explain the way we kinda do it up here. All this comes out of my hall except the RIT team. Most if not all the equipment comes off the lead truck...except the 4 inch. 2 alarm fires get a little more hectic.

    Lead truck(Capts Truck) first in with an attack line (senior man is in the jumpseat behind the capt. Junior grabs a tool and follows the senior man.) Usually when I am in the back I ask my senior man what they want me to grab,everyone is different. Driver is responsible for getting water/foam etc... and once things settle... then it is generators, spots and overall checks/adjustments and listening to radio talk.

    2nd truck in is the hydrant truck. Drop back two to hook and the driver assists the lead driver with connections,Lieu meets with command. Once they hook, one stays and the other becomes an extra man to hook up with the driver.

    3rd truck is backup crew to take the second line if needed or other equipment...ie. fans, pike poles etc. Or that truck can be released if the personnel are not needed, the truck can go back in commission and cover other trucks areas

    Aerial extra manpower or if we need the bucket.

    RIT team, extra manpower and just incase.

    Everyone should be familiar with what each truck does. Depends on what we got really. Like for dumpster/car fires juniors mask up, just depends. We rotate trucks every 3 weeks. So for three weeks I could be driving the Capts truck and then riding the hydrant truck.

    Just the way we do things around here.

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    Never forget...09-11 & the Brothers that gave there all

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    In my department, we haven't ever tried that method. we just let the oc of the truck tell everyone to do. this works out very nicely because my station has all closed cab trucks which eliminates a lot of the noise so we can actually hear the oc.

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    We go along ccfdblehman's idea. Officers on truck delegate duties when needed. Most guys know what needs to be done on most calls, so there is very little discussion. It works that way for us and we don't have to worry what seat we are sitting in.

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    Thanks for all your replies so far. Here is what is proposed for my department. This is a guideline and would be flexible for different situations such as persons trapped, etc. We are a small volunteer department that averages only 20-30 fire calls per year with 5 to 10 of those being working fires. It is tough for newer members to remember everything they're supposed to do and what tools they need off the rig. One other thing to note is that we have no truck, just 2 engines and a squad on first alarm.

    Let me know what you think:

    Apparatus Riding Assignments

    This guideline is to assist Firefighters in clarifying their initial duties and tools needed when responding to fire alarms, investigations and reported structure fires. It is not intended to supercede orders from the apparatus officer or the Incident Commander. Positions should be determined by seniority of the available crew and can be combined as staffing levels dictate. The most senior Firefighter would be the “Chauffeur” (unless needed for Acting Officer duties), next is “Nozzle”, etc. The most Junior Firefighter on that crew would occupy the “Hydrant” position. Second Due Engine & Rescue Squad Riding Assignments are for working fires only, otherwise crew remains in staged apparatus until directed by Incident Commander.

    First Due Engine Riding Assignments:

    Seat 1 (Right Front) – Officer
    Tools: SCBA, assigned portable radio, handlight, others as needed.
    Duties: Initial size up, investigation and Incident Commander.

    Seat 2 (Driver’s) – Chauffeur
    Tools: As needed.
    Duties: Driver/Pump Operator

    Seat 3 – Nozzle
    Tools: SCBA, Pre-connect hoseline.
    Duties: Investigation Mode – Stands by ready to deploy initial attack line. Attack Mode – Stretches attack line, attacks fire as directed.

    Seat 4 – Irons
    Tools: SCBA, Portable radio 1, flathead axe & halligan.
    Duties: Investigation Mode – Assists officer with making forcible entry as needed. Attack Mode – Forcible entry as needed, backs up Nozzle person on initial attack line.

    Seat 5 – Hook & Can
    Tools: SCBA, short pike pole, water extinguisher, handlight.
    Duties: Investigation Mode – Assist officer with investigation.
    Attack Mode – Third in on attack line. Pulls ceiling as needed. (Note: In Attack Mode, disregard water extinguisher.)

    Seat 6 – Hydrant
    Tools: SCBA, portable radio 2, hydrant wrench & adapter, LDH spanners, handlight.
    Duties: Investigation Mode – Assist other Firefighters as directed.
    Attack Mode – Pulls LDH from rear and hooks up to hydrant. (Note: In Fast Attack Mode, assists Nozzle person w/ flaking out initial attack line and other duties as assigned by officer.)



    Second Due Engine Riding Assignments:

    Seat 1 (Right Front) – Officer
    Tools: SCBA, assigned portable radio, handlight, others as needed.
    Duties: Directs crew to ladder fire building, next assignment as directed by Command (usually search or back up).

    Seat 2 (Driver’s) – Chauffeur
    Tools: As needed
    Duties: Driver/ Pump Operator.

    Seat 3 – Ladder
    Tools: SCBA, handlight
    Duties: Pulls extension ladder and ladders second story or roof as directed.

    Seat 4 – Ladder
    Tools: SCBA
    Duties: Pulls extension ladder and ladders second story or roof as directed.

    Seat 5 – Hydrant
    Tools: SCBA, portable radio, hydrant wrench & adapter, LDH spanners, handlight.
    Duties: Pulls LDH from rear and hooks up to hydrant and/or other duties as assigned.



    Rescue Squad Riding Assignments:

    Seat 1 (Right Front) – Officer
    Tools: Assigned portable radio, SCBA, handlight, others as needed.
    Duties: Initiate ventilation as directed by Incident Commander.

    Seat 2 (Driver’s) – Chauffeur / Saws
    Tools: SCBA, K12 Saw or Chain Saw
    Duties: Driver, readies saw(s) for roof ventilation use.

    Seat 3 – Irons
    Tools: SCBA, portable radio, pickhead axe, halligan bar.
    Duties: Ventilation as directed by officer.

    Seat 4 – Hook
    Tools: SCBA, long pike pole, handlight.
    Duties: Ventilation as directed by officer.

    Seat 5 – Fan
    Tools: SCBA, PPV Fan
    Duties: Set up PPV fan as directed by officer.

    Seat 6 – Fan
    Tools: SCBA, PPV Fan
    Duties: Set up PPV fan as directed by officer.
    Last edited by WTFD10; 04-03-2002 at 04:47 PM.
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

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    OK, looks like you have the right idea, but I can see 3 things...1. you should try to clean up the "hydrant" assignment to make it as clear as possible. I know that as a probie I would have read very deeply into this assignment and probably grabbed every tool you listed to do the job right...2. what about a second line being pulled? 3. What about search teams? Just some thoughts...

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    Originally posted by CIFD88
    OK, looks like you have the right idea, but I can see 3 things...1. you should try to clean up the "hydrant" assignment to make it as clear as possible. I know that as a probie I would have read very deeply into this assignment and probably grabbed every tool you listed to do the job right...2. what about a second line being pulled? 3. What about search teams? Just some thoughts...
    1. Good point but we have it set up so that the hydrant adaptor is left connected to the end of the layout and the wrench and spanners are tucked inside the LDH. The only things this person would have to grab from inside the rig are the radio and light.

    2 & 3. This would be done by the second due engine at the discretion of the IC. It is usually on scene within 1 minute of the first due.

    Thanks for the feedback
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

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    We usually ride with 5 /6 crew & apart from a few positions we ride with the following;

    OIC-either the Watch Commander or in his abscence a Crew Commander.
    Driver-Firefighter (we have 6 drivers on a crew of 11 & they take turns).
    Breathing Apparatus-No1 Crew Commander. (Rides in the back).
    "" "" "" ""-No2 Firefighter.
    Entry Control (looks after the BA Team).
    Hydrant/gopher.

    Normally it works out that the same people (where have you heard that before?!), are riding, so apart from the OIC or his deputy, most things stay the same.
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

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    Something you may want to consider is setting up for your minimum crew and expanding from there. For instance, in the example above Seat 6 gets the hydrant. What happens when only 4 or 5 are filled? What we do is use the driver to lay in (kinda hard to run without one) The driver isn't wearing SCBA or trying to get ready for the firefight, he gets out, dumps the line and hydrant bag, gets back in and lays his line. If Seat 4 on our engine is manned, his whole job is the hydrant and he does the job for the driver. We like to run with 4, it gives us 2 in and 2 out as a minimum, puts a line in the street and an attack line in service. If we run with 3, we can do everything but keep the 2nd guy out, the riding assignments reflect that. Beware of assignments that are given "on the fly" or "worked out" among the crew. Riding assignments reflect the Department leadership's tactics. A lack of SOP's or standards for each position all too often result in key assignments being missed. Why reinvent the wheel every time you go out? Figure out what you need, break it down and assign it.

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    Here's my question: Are seat assignments setup for each type of call you may receive and what truck you are? For example, we run 2 companies in our department. If we get a call for structure fire with persons trapped, our first truck on scene is going into search/rescue mode. The second truck on scene is going into suppression mode. First truck on scene could be from company 1 today and company 2 tomorrow. Same follows with third and fourth trucks. Next day we get a call for a vehicle fire. Same first and second trucks responding but their arrivals are reversed. I posted above that we don't use riding assignments, but it is something that we have discussed and this type of scenario was brought up. I'm looking for how companies who use assignments address this.

    Not saying it's good or bad, just looking for information.

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    If your talking paid people the Company Officer should assign each person a duty at the beginning of the shift no matter where they sit. He should take into account each persons strengths and weak areas when assigning out duties.

    If your talking volunteer it should be by SOP. Best way I have seen is the jump seat behind the Engineer is the hydrant seat, that way the Engineer can watch that person dismount. Seat behind the Officer is the nozzle seat so that when they dismount they meet each other right away and can make a quick decision on which line and how to make the attack.

    The key to assigning seats is training. You can assign all the duties you want but it depends on the training of the personnel as to whether they will first, remember what seat does what, and second, how to perform the duties of that seat.
    I would...but no!

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    Thumbs up

    We use them at the station I volunteer at but not where I work. They work well as long as all the members realize that if the truck is not full, the remaining jobs need to be completed as well. Training has a big part to play in making it a success.

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    Bones,
    You describe a potentially great situation for both Chiefs to sit down and lay out how things should work. That way it doesn't matter who arrives first, the job gets done the same way. Even if the other company won't play nicely, you can set it up for you own company and have your officers simply assign duties as required to 2nd company that support your tactics.

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