Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 40 of 40
  1. #21
    Forum Member nmfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maryland (DC Suburb)
    Posts
    5,738

    Default

    Hmm, I never saw this before. Lets put it this way. I'm a dispatcher. I'm a FF/EMT. I would definately ASK those questions (PD/Domestic/Etc) and I would have no problem answering them either.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.


  2. #22
    Forum Member MrJim911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    225

    Default

    I didn't even understand the first question until I read the responses. We never get requests for equipment in that manner, everyone brings the stuff they need with them as far as I understand.

    As far as the police needed at scene calls. That should be a policy. If the situation demands a police response then they should be sent. And that info should be included in the dispatch of the call. Setting up SOP's that both sides agree on are vital for proper communications.

  3. #23
    BUGGY5632
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    I agree with MrJim. There should be SOG's regarding PD responses to incidents such as these. Crime scene preservation/scene security makes any incident such as the one described above go much smoother. As far as priority is concerned, especially where I work. Everybody thinks that their incident is more important than everybody else's, or their incident is the only one going on at the time. Dispatchers are not robots.

  4. #24
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    383

    Default

    As a dispatcher, the only gripe I have is talking to people .

  5. #25
    Forum Member nmfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maryland (DC Suburb)
    Posts
    5,738

    Default

    Originally posted by SSHANK42
    As a dispatcher, the only gripe I have is talking to people .
    That's the unfortunate part of this job... people. You can't live with them (because they're morons) and you can't live without them (you wouldn't have a job).
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  6. #26
    MembersZone Subscriber strippel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    6

    Default

    In my county, any thing other than status or important messages over the radio is not easily tolerated. There are way too many calls, and not enough frequencies or dispatchers for extra stuff.

    As far as asking for police.... Our dispatchers are really good at warning us about possibly dangerous situations. But, sometimes they miss things. We live in a large county, with 1000 square miles, and 1/2 a million people. There are about 175 fire and EMS dispatches per day. Add to that 30 different police agencies; full time, part time, state police. Things can get confused.

    We always ask, unless specifically told, if the scene is safe, and that police are responding.
    My opinions are my own, etc. Everything that Ozzy writes here, except spelled correctly.

    Proud member LEMSA PAD/VPS team.

  7. #27
    MembersZone Subscriber mtomek112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    145

    Default

    I think one of the biggest problems of people in the field is the fact that they really don't realize what all goes on in a dispatch center. People in the field primarily have to worry about themselves and no one else. We in dispatch have to worry about every piece of apparatus in the city. It would help if FF's going through school would come sit in the dispatch center for a couple of days to get an idea as to what all goes on, just like dispatchers need to do more than one day on a ride-along in the field. I've had the pleasure of being a Volunteer FF for 12 years before going to work for Memphis FD Communications and now ride with a Volunteer Dept right outside of Memphis. Riding some also here in Memphis, I know what it is like on the both sides of the mic as well. FF's need to spend more time in the comm center to see what it is like, and dispatchers need to spend more time in the field to see what it is like. Officers on the apparatus need to realize and remember that when they make a request, there may be another request in the works from one of the other 81 pieces of apparatus in the city. Nothing is completed in 30 seconds. Dispatchers need to know what it is like in the field. They need to get to know as many fire fighters in the field as they can. That also helps the working relationship. You are more prone to get mad at someone you have never met before that is talking to you on the radio as opposed to one of your "buddies" on a company making a request. Their needs to be more mutual knowledge as to what goes on with both sides of the mic. When that is accomplished, things should run a lot smoother.

  8. #28
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    7,857

    Default

    I didnt read Waynes post (or any until today), and let me say this.
    I am on both sides of the mic for now many years. A request to bring gear isnt that hard and should be relayed. The other part about asking if the PD is enroute, well of course they are or will be ! I would be more concerned if they made it there so I know if I can enter, likewise we will tell you that when it is safe to enter.

    Locally, I dispatch for a County EMS agency but the county sheriff and metro city police and FD's are all on the same floor also, so we know what is "going on" around us most of the time. With that a few of my peeves:
    1) Dispatched to an ACCINJ (MVA)and the FD calls wanting to know if the PD is enroute ? Uhmmmmmmmmmmmmm DUH , have they quit going to injury accidents ?
    2) They call and request an ambulance, we get on the same radio channel to tell them who they are getting and get no response, only of course to have them turn right around and ask us "who are we getting on XXX street?" Hello........shouldnt you be anticpating this ? after all YOU ASKED !
    3)Go to tell the first responder they are or are not getting a Medic Unit (after they go enroute)and they dont answer again to only have call us and ask if they are getting one.
    4)Paramedics who dont know their own procedures, and call us asking for the answer.........
    And in closing now that I feel better, certainly if you dont know ask, but try to not sound rediculous doing it, instead of asking if the PD is enroute, ask for an ETA, have some patience with us previously noted there could be LOTS more going on at that little minute than the SINGLE incident you are assigned to.

    OOOPS forgot one ...........all county units have MDT's ....so they get the same 911 screen we do ..........and they ask "Do you have anymore information on this call?" Hello.............if it isnt on your screen thats all we get too, do crews think we WOULD NOT tell them something >? or that the info Fairy only tells us stuff we arent going to telll the crews ? .....now I am out
    Last edited by Weruj1; 05-07-2005 at 01:12 PM.
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  9. #29
    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Not the end of the earth but I can see it from here...
    Posts
    2,318

    Default

    For the most part our dispatchers do a fine job, but there are some lapses (on both sides of the mike). I think one problem is that we are dispatched by Sheriff's Office dispatchers...Sometimes I get the feeling that our communications take a backseat to SO communications....

    But you all are right, I think every new firefighter should have to take a trip to their dispatch center and see the problems that those folks have to deal with...definitely understaffed, and the training is almost non-existent. If you have a dispatcher with a few years experience, they do a good job, but new people are usually cut loose with a day or two of training...not a good situation.

    Just by way of example, let me describe a situation we had a couple of years ago....new dispatcher sends us to a school bus accident with injuries. We're immediately thinking MCI, and knowing that our School Board's policy is that ALL passengers get transported regardless of apparant injuries, I know we'll need extra hands. One of my folks also recognizes this and quickly requests mutual aid from a neighboring department.

    "There's not a fire, sir, you don't need the fire department".

    I'm incredulous. Who the hell does she think WE are? I jump on the radio...."Ma'am, XYZ fire department was requested....get them en route!" She finally complies, but I later found out from someone who was in the dispatch center that day that she went into a rant, demanding to know who I was and who was my supervisor (we're volunteer) and she was going to report me. I mean really, who the hell is she to tell me what I do or don't need....I don't want to have to explain why I want what I want every time I request mutual aid!

    Around that same time we had one dispatcher (don't know if it was the same one) who a couple of us happened to hear only because our pagers were on monitor...

    "Napoleonville dispatch to Paincourtville Fire Department...."

    Silence....We're waiting.....

    "Napoleonville dispatch to Paincourtville Fire Department..."

    "Napoleonville, you have traffic for Paincourtville?"

    "10-4 sir, need you en route to blah blah blah...."

    "Ummm.....ma'am, you need to go ahead and page that...."

    "Oh....OK, 10-4" She finally tones us out.

    So nobody explained to her that you need to activate the pagers to get the fire department....I guess she thought we just answered our radios day or night like her deputies do....

    We haven't had too many problems lately....I think since the new sheriff took over, and they moved into a new dispatch center, the supervision and the training has greatly improved. But man, we could tell some stories.

    Now, to be fair, I'll mention one thing that WE need to do better....which is remembering the address!!! Say we're dispatched to 5500 Highway 1....we roll out of bed, stumble out of the house....Guaranteed before anyone gets to the station someone will ask them to repeat the address. OK, that's understandable...then someone else (who didn't hear the request) will ask for it again. Then they get to the station and get in the rescue truck, and someone asks for it again.....then they get in the general area and ask for it again ! I mean really, I could understand that they'd be getting a little impatient with us by now..... I've seen this happen, numerous times.....(I really like the new pagers with the "record" feature that lets you play back the dispatch....some of us have 'em, virtually eliminates having to ask for repeats....I think we'll get them all that way in the future....)
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  10. #30
    Early Adopter cozmosis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,921

    Default

    At the moment, the group of dispatchers in my city is pretty solid.

    However, I have a real problem with their training -- or lack thereof. In Arkansas, all career police officers & firefighters must attended a state-approved rookie school. To be a dispatcher, you merely have to be breathing. In some small towns, they may actually waive that requirement.

    Dispatchers are literally the life line for units in the field. They should be trained to the proper level and compensated for it. As it is in my state, many towns pay their dispatchers less than their rookie police officers and firefighters. How disappointing.

  11. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    8

    Default 911 Breakdown in Philadelphia

    This is a rather long Newspaper Article well worth the read. Copy the URL if neccessary
    http://citypaper.net/articles/current/cover.shtmlhttp://citypaper.net/articles/current/cover.shtml

  12. #32
    MembersZone Subscriber mtomek112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    145

    Default

    This month's Firehouse magazine has a pretty good article about dispatcher training. Here in Memphis, we did 3 months traning in a classroom and then about three months out on the floor with a trainer before we could start working by ourselves. We didn't get set free until our trainer thought we were ready. In my 13 years experience, this is probably one of the best training situations for rookies that I've seen.

  13. #33
    MembersZone Subscriber Dickey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,111

    Default

    Question #1.....

    Not sure how your area is set up so bear with me. If you ask your dispatcher to tell other responders to bring stuff, aren't they on the same frequency and hear it when you talk to dispatch? Why not go direct with your other responding personnel? If they are not on your frequency then why not switch to the one they are on?

    Question #2.....

    Here we simulcast on Police, Fire/EMS and any first responder frequency meaning we dispatch all agencies at once on their own primary frequency. So.....for someone here to ask if law enforcement is enroute is a pretty dumb question. Again, not sure how you are set up so it might be a legit question. Is your law enforcement dispatch and fire dispatch seperate?

    We usually say to first responders and Fire/EMS that the scene is not secure and then advise them when it is so they can approach the scene.

    We are pretty lucky in my area. Agencies get along very well and know how the other one operates so most of the time one agency can anticipate what the other guy is going to do. We have great working relationships and cooperation is some of the best I have seen. It is very important for dispatchers to know and understand what it's like on the other end of the radio as well as firefighters and cops to see our side. New dispatchers have to ride with Fire and Police and new firefighters and police officers have to sit in the Comm.Center. That is the key to the working relationship.

    I can tell you that just a squeel or two on the radio is the best and fastest way to **** off your dispatcher!!!! Leave the pager at the station or turn it off!!!!!! sorry, pet peve of mine!!
    Jason Knecht
    Assistant Chief
    Altoona Fire Dept.
    Altoona, WI

    IACOJ - Director of Cheese and Whine
    http://www.cheddarvision.tv/
    EAT CHEESE OR DIE!!

  14. #34
    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Not the end of the earth but I can see it from here...
    Posts
    2,318

    Default

    Not sure how your area is set up so bear with me. If you ask your dispatcher to tell other responders to bring stuff, aren't they on the same frequency and hear it when you talk to dispatch? Why not go direct with your other responding personnel?
    Well, in some rural areas, the radio system is not the best. Many rural radio systems do not work off of a repeater, so all traffic is unit-to-unit. Sometimes, depending on distance, you cannot talk to a unit directly but you can reach Dispatch...so occasionally you'll have to get them to relay a message.

    We often had this problem a few years back, before we got on a repeater system.



    Here we simulcast on Police, Fire/EMS and any first responder frequency meaning we dispatch all agencies at once on their own primary frequency. So.....for someone here to ask if law enforcement is enroute is a pretty dumb question. Again, not sure how you are set up so it might be a legit question. Is your law enforcement dispatch and fire dispatch seperate?
    Our law enforcement and fire dispatch are done in the same dispatch center, by the same people, but not on the same frequency. There is no simulcast. So if you happen to have your radio on scan, you may hear law enforcement being dispatched, but if you get the call via voice pager you only hear the fire dispatch...so you really can't be sure if law enforcement is coming. So we'll ask to make sure.

    Like someone said, there are some more graceful ways to make sure...."Do you have law enforcement en route?" implies that you think they don't. Better would be "Can you give me an ETA on law enforcement?", or "We will stage at XXX location until we get the all-clear"....that way you still make sure they're coming, but also sound like you fully expected it.
    Last edited by dmleblanc; 05-20-2005 at 08:27 AM.
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  15. #35
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    77

    Default

    our dispatch center has improved a lot since an experenced dispatcher was named as the supervisior a while back.

    is it perfect? no but it is a lot better than it was on the county side, here all es agencies are dispatched from a central dispatch center.

    they have finaly quit givening the so and the ems folks a head start on mvas, before letting the first responders and fds in on the incident. 2 to 5 minutes was not unusal i am not making this up.

    what makes this sad is they have had the ability to dispatch pd, ems and fd at the same time but they did not always do this for the county but they did for the city (see second sentence)

    now if we can convince a dispatcher or 2 that we do not work for them and that they are not the ic and that they can or cannot tell us were we can go or not go. i am not talking about crimes or fights in progress.

    i heard one of them the other night tell a deptuty that he was letting him go a certain area to check on something.

    please overlook the spelling and grammer.

  16. #36
    MembersZone Subscriber BVFD1983's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    434

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BUGGY5632
    It seems that your EMS system has a unique protocol that raises a couple of issues: Like why do you first respond to a scene without gear? You are just another rubbernecking bystander if you show up without any equipment. I am all for the Chain of Survival, but you are no good without PPE. Solution: Get a personal set of gear or have your SOG's changed.
    I am going to step out on a limb here and say that if they are allowed to stop and help if they come upon a scene, they would probably have some gloves and a pocket mask stashed in their vehicle, I know I do.
    FTM - PTB

  17. #37
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    21

    Default

    to answer your questions in my PERSONAL opinion:

    #1 ... i dont mind relaying requests as long as it is business oriented.. if it has something to do with something pertinent ... then yes by all means i'll take the extra steps in the middle of my call entry, answering radio units, responding to cad messages and answering the phones (all at the same time) but if its something that has nothing to do with anything pertinent, no i wont.

    #2 ... and come on guys...give us some credit... i work in the field too but do you honestly think i'm going to put you in a position where you could get hurt? PD ALWAYS goes to a scene if there is a REMOTE possibility of an unsecure scene... i would be ****ed if you assumed i didn't have the common sense to send them
    J.E. Guzman
    NC EMT-Intermediate
    NC Emergency Medical Dispatcher
    NENA Emergency Medical Dispatcher
    NENA Emergency Telecommunicator

  18. #38
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Im a dispatcher. I used to be FF and ran EMS also. In ref to the original post can I ask question? Why do you need a dispatcher to ask your dept to bring your equip? Do you not have the same channel in your radio they will be transmitting on? Why no ask them yourself? That is my question in all of this. In reguards to the stabbing incident, I feel like when the question is asked, i am being asked if Im doing my job. I know how it feels on the other side though. When I was running calls, I did want to know if pd was on scene. Also, we fax run sheets to agencies when they clear calls. It was sent on letterhead to each agency in our county that this info would be faxed to their stations when they clear each call. We still have some agencies that req that info to be faxed when they clear the calls. I feel this is anothe instance where they are questioning me if I am doing my job. Also each agency has recently been given laptop computers to put on their rigs with the mapping system in them. But they still feel the need to ask for directions to a call. They have the same information we have.Dont get me wrong I have a lot of "pet peeve " things to do with the pd's also but I wont go into them in this thread. In conclusion , like I said, I have been on both sides and I know how it is on each side. I understand alot of things as to where some(most) of the people I work with in here do not. I feel when you have so many people working to achieve the same goal you will have friction within.

    Be safe Auk

  19. #39
    BUGGY5632
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BVFD1983
    I am going to step out on a limb here and say that if they are allowed to stop and help if they come upon a scene, they would probably have some gloves and a pocket mask stashed in their vehicle, I know I do.
    I would hope most First Responders do. I carry a small bag with BLS supplies, it goes with me on every trip I take. It just seems that I come across something every time I leave town.

  20. #40
    Forum Member raricciuti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Mt. Lebanon, PA 15228
    Posts
    105

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ramseycl
    I have been on both sides of the radio and I see the frustration from both sides. One of the biggest problems that we have at dispatch is the units in the field have no idea what we are doing. They think that if we are not talking on their channel we are sitting up here doing nothing. I work for a combined center that dispatches for fire/ems, and several law enforcement agencies. What a lot of people don't understand is at any given time I can be monitoring 3-4 radio channels as well as answering 911 and non emergency calls all at the same time. If we are really busy it gets loud up here and sometimes we may miss radio traffic.
    Herein lies the problem - this dispatcher is monitoring 3-4 frequencies, AND 9-1-1, AND non emergency phones. We don't expect a lone firefighter to drive the apparatus, operate the aerial, run the pump, stretch the attack line, search the structure, vent the roof, etc. Until the folks who control the budget $$$ are educated in what dispatchers do and how critical their function is to public safety, they will be placed in unenviable situations, such as deciding who gets their attention at a given moment.

    In an ideal world, there should be dispatch personnel assigned to specific jobs. Such as a FIRE DISPATCHER, who handles the radio for the fire incident - not the 9-1-1 lines, not the PD, not the animal control department. etc. A 9-1-1 call taker should not be on teh radio. PD, FD, & EMS can request more help (mutual aid) to get sufficient resources to handle the incident at hand. The dispatchers don't have this option. Dispatch centers need to be staffed commensurate with the POTENTIAL call volume, not the AVERAGE.

    Having seen both halves of the equation, it will take a strong, dedicated effort on the part of all emergency services to make the case for adequate numbers of QUALIFIED dispatch personnel. And the cases where a PD officer at lunch is stuck in the dispatcher's chair so the lone dispatcher can make a bathroom trip have to end. Would the PD be OK with the dispatcher grabbing a shotgun and responding to a shots fired call? Likewise, the cop shouldn't be handed a headset and a keyboard and be expected to function as a dispatcher.
    R.A. Ricciuti
    Mt. Lebanon Fire Department

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts