View Poll Results: Do you feel that this Senario is complete enough for a Lead-in for Disaster Prep.?

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  • Good.

    7 70.00%
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  1. #1
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    N.W. Oklahoma
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    8

    Talking Scenario for disaster training

    WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF......

    Thursday, 1400hrs
    Dewey County has been under a tornado watch for 3 hours. The Vici Fire Dept. has 2 vehicles out storm-watching. Unit 51-rescue is 6 miles west on Hwy. 60. Unit 57-brush-truck is at the south end of the Vici airport.

    The latest weather reports have a "Super-cell" thunderstorm tracking from around Roll, Okla. northeast towards western Dewey and southern Woodward Counties at 40 mph.

    1420 hrs
    Tornado warnings issued for eastern Ellis and southern Woodward Counties until 1445 hrs.

    1425 hrs
    Vici storm-watchers report small hail, heavy rain, and 50-60 mph southwest wind.

    1427 hrs
    Doppler '9000' indicates a prominant circulation 1 1/2 miles southwest of Vici, storm-wachers can see nothing due to heavy rains.

    1432 hrs
    A large tornado, approx. 3/4 mile wide at the base, touches down 1/2 mile southwest of Vici and heads northeast at 35 mph. Unit 57 sees the tornado and radios the city hall to sound the siren. The siren sounds for 60 seconds.

    120 seconds later, the damage is done. There is not a building in Vici that has not recieved major damage.

    The school, gym, auditorium, and caffiteria have collapsed, trapping the students and teachers. The water towers were ripped apart, the nursing homes west wing is destroyed with major damage to the rest of the facility, most of the down-town area buildings have had roofs and walls collapse. The Vici Co-op fuel pumps have been broden off by debris, the feed-store and fertilizer/pesticide storage areas were destroyed and chemicle reactions have started fires which are causing a large yellowish cloud to drift south. The Fire Station has collapsed with all other fire and ambulance units inside. Most streets, especially Hwy. 60, are blocked by debris, the Co-op propane and anhydros tanks were torn from their platforms, one large tank is lying across Hwy 60 with a small rupture in the side.

    The phones are out, the power is out, the gas is on, and the nearest help is 20 miles away.........



  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Aug 2001
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    25 NW of the GW
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    8,434

    Default What to do...What to do.

    Great way,(posting those circumstances) to get a sample of tactics and strategy from the readers of this forum. I see that this scenario is not out of the realm of possibilities. Is this based on the damage reports from the F5 tornado that struck there on 04/19/1939?

    Does the Vici area have a pre-plan that accounts for this type of incident?

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber

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    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
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    1,767

    Default

    Who is this senario for? Your Dept or the LEPC. As a department wide drill it is too much. Could it happen, sure. but as a first responder it is too much.

    I was the coordinator for an emergency management department for many years and had to set up several drills. If you are doing a tabletop with the PD and FD chief, village manager, county OEM, PW director then go for it. If you are trying to do a full scale practical then forget it, first it will be very hard to set up and will take too long to play out. You will leave your responders frustrated and bitchy, and it will be hard to make it constructive.

    The scenario you describe is open ended one single building fire or tank leak is more a closed incident and better used for a practical.

    I like your enthusiasm but start small.

  4. #4
    Junior Member

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    Mar 2002
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    N.W. Oklahoma
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    Default

    NJFFS_A16: The f-5 that you are referring to missed us by about 20 miles. This scenario was written in March of 1997, and our Chief at the time thought that it was a good attention-getter, if totally unlikely (his father, however, thought it was pretty much on the mark...he was in Woodward in 1939. LOL).

    During the May 3, 1999 tornados in the center of Oklahoma, our department was dispatched to Bridge Creek, the small community where the greatest loss of life was reported, in order to help with search and rescue. I had never seen the type or degree of distruction as I wittnessed in that area! It looked like the area had been freshly graded....no trees, houses, trash, or even grass! It was a Very Intresting Experience!!

  5. #5
    Junior Member

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    Mar 2002
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    N.W. Oklahoma
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    Default

    ADSN/WFLD: This scenario is something that I hand out for in-class discussion, be it Firefighters, EMTs, Nursing Home employees, or whoever. I normally get some good feed-back and some somber looks (LOL). I agree that this would be a logistical nightmare for actual training and response, though it would be interesting!

  6. #6
    Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Bridgecreek Fire Dept, OK
    Posts
    49

    Default Mutual aid

    The scenerio you have detailed can and does happen. It can take a perfectly beautiful day and turn it into a nightmare. What it all boils down to is training, training, training. I realize this is't an earth shattering answer but if you've gone through a major mass-casualty event you realize the importance of having personel that can work with confidence in their skills. Not that you can train for something like this but your departmental training should be taken very serious every month. It doesn't matter if you've trained on that same subject every six months, you'll need those skills without having to think about it. When a major tornadic event takes place, ALL of your skills will be tested. We were hit around 1800 hrs on May 3rd 99, and had a massive number of casualties. By 2200 hrs that night we moved our last victim by mediflight. I don't remember the exact number of casualties but it was around 275 to 300 that required transport. Some were transported by neighbors in POV's but the majority were taken by ambulance, but all of them had to be assesed, stabalized and packaged just to move them to the triage area for transport. The point I started out to make is this, when it happened, everyone jumped in and through previous training and experience everything went as smooth as possible. From major HAZMAT concerns, triage, extrication, or search and rescue, it all had to be addressed at the same time. Incident Management is critical and without everyone participating, you'll have chaos! No department can be totally prepared, but everyone can start through a good traning officer and program. Mutual Aid is of course vital, even if they are far away its nice to know their on the way. Thanks for comming to help us, I know it is and was very much appreciated. Stay safe brother.




    Tell your family you love them

  7. #7
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    N.W. Oklahoma
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    8

    Thumbs up Joel K.

    Glad to have been able to help!

    A correction on the tornado that hit Woodward, though. It occured April 9, 1947.

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