1. #1
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    Default Deadly Tornado's

    Just saw that one hell of a storm punched across the east yesterday. 6 reported dead and a bunch of injured. Just wondering how many of you work in that area and how things are going. We had a pretty bad tornado here in 1995, but luckily no fatalities with it.





    Scott Reasor
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    Default

    We were out from 2:00 PM to 11:00 PM. TONS of tree damage, wires down, etc. We had structural damage ranging from shingles to total collapse. This is in the Mercer/Venango county area in PA.
    May we never forget our fallen, worldwide.

    I.A.C.O.J. Safety/Traffic Control Officer

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    Default What the hail was that?

    StayBack-
    That must have been part of the same front that went through my area. I've lived here most of my life, and I've never seen the amount and size (marble to golf ball sized) hail that we got yesterday. It completely covered the parking lot and street around the FD. I was working, and expected to be out a lot, but it was surprisingly quiet. Quite a pleasant surprise.
    Steve Gallagher
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    Default What the hail was that?

    StayBack-
    That must have been part of the same front that went through my area. I've lived here most of my life, and I've never seen the amount and size (marble to golf ball sized) hail that we got yesterday. It completely covered the parking lot and street around the FD. I was working, and expected to be out a lot, but it was surprisingly quiet. Quite a pleasant surprise.
    Steve Gallagher
    IACOJ BOT
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    "I don't apologize for anything. When I make a mistake, I take the blame and go on from there." - Woody Hayes

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    We were deployed to Charles County Maryland with our Ladder and Engine from Prince Georges County. We left the station around 7pm and I was tillering the Ladder truck and did not return to quarters until 4am. There was one confirmed dead in our area. The devastation was un-imaginable for that part of Maryland. We worked closely with the USAR team from Fairfax County Virginia and I must say they are a good bunch of guys, very helpful and willing to let the local companies be involved with all aspects of their operation regardless of us being Volunteers. They are truly "Professionals."
    You Waste your time, YOUR LINE IS MINE!

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    Steamer -- Yeah it was. It really seemed to fire up around Cortland,OH. (the cell that hit us, that is)
    May we never forget our fallen, worldwide.

    I.A.C.O.J. Safety/Traffic Control Officer

    E6511

    "Who's Who Among American Teachers" - 2005, 2006 Honoree

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    I'm in Anne Arundel County, just north of the county hit by the F-4 tornado. Three were killed and a lot more injured. The university of MD was hit by a tornado just after 9/11, but it wasnt as bad. I've never seen or heard of anything like what hit last night.


    Megan
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    Default

    Well I can say I have never seen anything like that before in my life and I hope to never see anything like that again. When we were responding to the scene we knew whatever happened was going to be bad because of the sounds of people on the radio. We arrived in the town of La Plata(Charles County Maryland) to find it like a bomb had went off right in the middle of town. We were there all night and then countinue to go back everyday after until today. A total of 3 people died in the tornado and several more were injured. Hundreds of building were destroyed or damaged in some way. You can take a look at some web sites to see the pics. www.thewatchdesk.com (go under St Marys County) www.kentland33.com www.mvfd.com www.hvfd7.com

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    Post Blowin' in the Wind

    It's times like this that show you the value of ICS. Multi-agency responses put it to the test....and post incident critique should address the success, or failure of your ICS training!

    Review it, revise it....understand it! It's one of our most valuable tools!

    Organized chaos or efficient operations? ICS is what YOU make it!
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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    Is it just me, or has the number of twisters here on the east coast been surprisingly high? Just thinking out loud, that's all...
    These are my opinions, not those of my career department, my volunteer company, or my affiliates. And by the way, I'm not a Junior.

    Buy me a drink, sing me a song, take me as I come 'cause I can't stay long.

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    Post Ill winds blow East

    Originally posted by WFDjr1
    Is it just me, or has the number of twisters here on the east coast been surprisingly high? Just thinking out loud, that's all...
    That thought DID come to mind. Tornado activity has seemed rather unusual for that part of the country. It shows the need to be prepared for anything....no matter what the odds are. That was the thought behind my ICS post. It can make...or break the success of interagency responses.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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    Default

    It was a perfect day around here yesterday until around three when the wind really started picking up and we were out from 1500 to 2100 hours in just about every part of our town. Mainly trees on live wires, wires down, and trees across the road. It was a real mess but nothing compared to those storms in the mid-atlantic. At least the weather was clear.

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    Default hitting closer to home

    The AP is reporting 4 dead in a tornado just a few miles southwest of me. The Texas panhandle had a rough sunday evening. Several tornado's and lots of hail. It all went around me, but the town of Happy got nailed with one. Local news isn't reporting on fatalities yet, but I'm sure if the AP got the info it must be from a source in that area. We haven't been called down there yet, so I don't know how much damage there is. Looks like a hoppin spring storm season for most of the United States.



    Scott Reasor
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    Post ToTo...I don't think we're in Maryland anymore!

    By STEPHEN MANNING
    Associated Press Writer
    LA PLATA, Md. (AP) - Doug Patac didn't think much of the tornado
    warning that came across his car radio as he sat at a traffic light
    in downtown La Plata Sunday night. After all, this is Maryland, he
    thought, not the Midwest where dodging tornadoes is a way of life.
    Minutes later a funnel cloud choked with shingles, metal,
    branches and other airborne missiles chased him up the street as he
    fled for his house. Patac, 34, made it home safely, but the
    powerful tornado flattened much of the small town and caused five
    deaths in southern Maryland.
    "This is just something you see on TV," said a dazed Patac,
    standing among downed power lines and tree parts just hours after
    the storm.
    Many residents of La Plata said the same thing as they tried to
    salvage what they could from splintered homes and rubble heaps that
    were once stores and businesses. The storm was unreal - this type
    of thing just doesn't happen in Maryland.
    That kind of talks worries James Travers, head meteorologist for
    the National Weather Service's Washington-Baltimore region.
    About eight to 12 occur each year in the state, although most
    never reach the magnitude of the one that struck La Plata, Travers
    said.
    Another tornado, in fact, hit Cecil County Thursday night,
    damaging several homes, but not causing any injuries.
    While tornado threats to the region pale in comparison to the
    massive twisters that rumble each year through Tornado Alley in the
    Great Plains states, conditions in the Washington area and southern
    Maryland offer the right ingredients that allow a bad storm to give
    birth to funnel clouds.
    "People say we don't get tornadoes in the Washington area.
    Hopefully, after the last six months or so, I won't hear anybody
    say that anymore," Travers said.
    It may be just be a natural fluke, he said, but the region has
    been buffeted by at least three powerful tornadoes in the last four
    years.
    The power of a tornado is rated on a Fujita scale, which ranges
    from F0 for the weakest to F5 for the strongest. In the past four
    years, Maryland has three twisters that have ranked on the scale's
    high end.
    In 1998, an F4 tornado hit Frostburg, causing heavy damage. Last
    fall an F3 bowled through College Park, destroying a fire and
    rescue center and killing two sisters, both University of Maryland
    students. Sunday's storm was the strongest the state has ever seen,
    an F5 tornado that packed winds of more than 260 mph at times.
    Travers says that further studies need to be done on the
    Washington region to determine if it is prone to periodic powerful
    tornadoes. The answer, he says, may lie in geography.
    From Washington down to St. Mary's City, Maryland is bordered by
    water - the Potomac River on one side and the Chesapeake Bay on the
    other.
    The cool air created by that water - which can cause
    temperatures on the shore that are 10 degrees cooler than inland,
    especially in the spring - creates what Travers calls temperature
    "boundaries" around southern Maryland.
    Tornadoes form in the warm, moist air of thunderstorms as they
    move east across the country in advance of cold fronts. As that
    warm air moves across the cold air boundaries, the change in air
    temperature could inject enough instability into the storm to spawn
    a tornado, Travers said.
    Sunday's storm set off minor funnel clouds as it moved across
    Virginia, but didn't produce a major tornado until it hit the
    boundary of the Potomac.
    "It can be the final ingredient that will kick one of these
    things from a tornadic super cell that hasn't popped anything down
    to one that has," Travers said.
    Add to that the relatively flat terrain of southern Maryland and
    you've got the right mix for a tornado that could run for miles
    along the ground. Sunday's tornado did just that, cutting a path 24
    miles long through Charles and Calvert counties. The tornado also
    caused damage in Dorchester County across the bay on the Eastern
    Shore. All three counties have been declared federal disaster
    areas.
    But meteorologists also say residents shouldn't read too much
    into the recent string of destructive tornados that have hit
    Maryland. A tornado on the scale of the one that hit southern
    Maryland is extremely rare for the East Coast, said John Ogren of
    the National Weather Service.
    "I don't think there is any overall weather pattern change,"
    said Ogren, who heads a team assessing the strength of Sunday's
    tornado.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

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