1. #1
    Forum Member
    911WACKER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Waverly, NY
    Posts
    184

    Question Mobile Command Post??

    How many of your departments/counties have mobile command units that can be used for larger incidents? What are the SOP's for it's useage? How well does it work and How often??

    Looking for input, pro's and con's!!
    Firefighter/NREMT-P/Public Safety Diver
    May we ride into the darkness only to return as safe as we started!!

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    martinm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Northumberland, United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    My service has a mobile Incident Command & Control Unit, which is based at our HQ's and is mobilised to any incident of 6 engines and above. (We only have 23 engines, so 6+ is a biggish/goodish job).

    Basically it is a large demountable box, which is carried to the scene by its own truck, the box, as its called by everyone, can then be out on the ground near the job and the truck used for other things, like tanking, equipment ferrying. Its a big unit and has two separate areas, one for the control, with radios, faxes, mobiles phones and another which is for the whitehats to sit and plan etc.

    This box is big, about 20ft x 8ft and the whole rig is about 27ft long when its sitting on the truck.

    We have had it for a number of years now and it has onlt really been used "in anger" a few times. Basically the problem you have with them is they are only used for big incidents, can't be used for anything else and take a while to set up, usually so long that the incident is almost over by the time you get there and get the aerials up, radios issued and a comms system in place.

    We are using ours less and less as we have founnd you can do almost the same amount of stuff from the cab of one of the engines.

    Hope this is of some use to you.
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    868

    Default

    A nearby station has one, it looks like a Winnebago and is usually referred to as the "Barbie Bus" (that's the doll not the cooking appliance ) or sometimes the "Gelati Van".

    It gets called to all major incidents and has every damn radio you could ever wish for in it - it can talk to planes, ships, cops, ems, and probably the Space Shuttle. Also has Sat phones etc. The fax is very useful at Hazmat jobs for receiving info. Basically it operates as a communications hub for the fireground. Also carries heaps of maps etc.

    I don't think that it has had many runs this year due to there being not many major incidents, but it is very useful when you have a big job.

    It can be called by the Officer in Charge whenever he feels that he needs it at a job.

    Hope this helps
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

    ...and before you ask - YES I have done a Bloody SEARCH!

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,767

    Default

    Our Heavy rescue has a command area inside of it that is used on most incidents (especially in bad weather )
    The county Office of Emergency Management has a verry impressive command center. It has a radio area with radios that can transmit on every frequency that any police, fire, ems or public works department in the county uses. It also has a large confrence area for the IC and other department heads to use. While my town hasn't used it on any actual calls other agencies in the county have been happy with its operation when it came out.
    While we can call it out for anything, our procedure is to consider it for incidents that will take several hours to mitigate.

  5. #5
    Truckie
    SPFDRum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 1999
    Location
    St Paul, MN
    Posts
    2,516

    Thumbs up

    Try to get in touch with someone from Phoenix Fire. They use one quite extensively. Also, with the LODD of FF Tarver, they had an in-house investigation, and recommended the purchase of another.
    My posts reflect my views and opinions, not the organization I work for or my IAFF local. Some of which they may not agree. I.A.C.O.J. member
    "I ask, Sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them."
    George Mason
    Co-author of the Second Amendment
    during Virginia's Convention to Ratify the Constitution, 1788
    Elevator Rescue Information

  6. #6
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    145

    Default

    My dept.uses a mobile command post on all 2nd alarm or
    higher responses.A 2nd alarm has 28 units responding including chiefs,and support units.It responds to 2nd alarms but is only put to use after the response goes to 3rd alarm.(36 units total).
    A full first alarm assignment is 18 units total.
    Works out well most of the time.

    Stay safe, don 120... montreal fire department

  7. #7
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    770

    Default

    Providence is getting one, not sure on the details other than it could be going into service as early as this week.

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    Engine101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Monrovia Ca
    Posts
    615

    Default

    We don't have one but Glendale FD neighboring city has one old model RV Used for major incidents such as a major brush fire

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Somewhere between genius and insanity!
    Posts
    13,586

    Default

    Some of the larger Departments in Massachusetts have them. The Department of Fire Services also has a Mobile Command Post housed at the Massachusetts Fire Academy in Stow that can be sent anywhere in the state upon request. It has everything but a toilet... we refer to it as The Mothership...
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  10. #10
    Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Longview,Tx,United States
    Posts
    38

    Default

    We have a command center built in the back of our rescue truck which makes any working fire in the city. Even though the command center is there on scene at most fires(single family dwellings) the IC does not use it. At any larger fires it is used for sure we have no written sop on when you should climb in the back and use the command center so it is usually up to whoever is commanding the incident. Have noticed it being used a bit more during the summer time to get out of the heat and into the A/C.
    Never forget the fallen.

  11. #11
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Lafayette, Louisiana
    Posts
    28

    Default

    The Office of Emergency Preparedness has a mobile command post for Lafayette Parish in Louisiana. It is a converted city bus. From front to back ...

    Driver area with controls for emergency lighting, siren, mobile phone, trunk radios, tower mounted camera, tv, vcr, weather station, monitor for rearview camera, nighttime white and red light control.

    Communication area that can talk with all emergency responders for the parish, local government departments, national guard, aircraft freqs, amateur radio, marine, cb, scanners, surrounding agencies, commercial ems (just about DC to daylight). Also two RTU phone lines can be accessed. The trunking system even has a "SIP" that identifies who is keying up and identifies emergency button presses. Onboard generator controls are also in this area.

    Comfort area includes bathroom with sink, refrig, microwave, coffeepot, portable battery chargers.

    The work area includes lots of counterspace, chairs, two computers, color printer/copier, another sink, telephones tied to the RTUs or local landlines if we can wire, another tv and vcr, a remote head for the weatherstation, radio stations, DTN weather.

    The outside has flood lights, a crankup tower with beams and the camera, the roof is full of antennas, 3 A/C units, the dish for DTN weather, emergency lights.

    Of course the thing is full of storage cabinets with maps, charts, docs, tools, medical eqpt, computer equipment and supplies, food and water. Its been around for quite a few years. We are designing the next generation (we learned a lot with this one!). It has to be a long duration fire for the MOC (mobile operations center) to make the call, but since it gets used for SO, PD, parades (remember Mardi Gras here) calls too it sees more that just fire calls.
    ...SVFD162

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register