1. #1
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    Default Vertical Ventilation

    vertical ventilation is something that is rarely done here i have done it once in almost 9 years. how often do you ventilate vertically and under what conditions do you do it. what tools do you take and do you breathe air when ventilating?
    I PROVIDE A NAMELESS FACELESS SERVICE TO A COMMUNITY THAT RARELY KNOWS HOW MUCH THEY NEED ME IF I AM CALLED FROM A SOUND SLEEP TO SACRIFICE MY LIFE TRYING TO SAVE THE PROPERTY OR LIFE OF SOMEONE I DO NOT KNOW I WILL DO SO WITHOUT REGRET
    From the book "The Heart Behind The Hero" from Jon Mc Duffie in memory of Joe Dupee LAFD

  2. #2
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    Definitley vertically vent if you are presented with flashover/backdraft, but really anytime you have a working fire and especially if you think it has extended into the attic. As for what tools to take that's easy:

    A Partner: Never go up alone.

    SCBA: Never go up without air, you never know what might happen.

    Trash Hook: Best roof sounding tool, can be used on shingles, great for punching through sheet rock celings.

    Axe: Good sounding tool, used if chainsaw fails.

    Chainsaw: Let a machine do the cutting just don't cut the rafters.

    Roof Ladder: Helps provide stability for you and your partner.

    Also, get on the roof, cut the hole, don't screw around and admire your work or the view GET OFF QUICKLY!
    I would...but no!

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    While we usually preform horizontal vent. We go to the roof; suspected attic involvement, single story buildings with good involvement and top floor fire.
    Our SOG's have us on air when on the roof, but it isn't always followed.
    As for tools it depends on the type of building and roof construction. You need some hand tools (they always start) I like the 8 lb maul. it breaks through most wood roofs and can break/clear slate and tile well. A long pole (no less than 8') While chainsaws work well I still like the Partner saw. Not 100% sold on any one specialty blade.
    I know what I don't like. The blade claims to cut everything and looks like a standard blade but instead of teeth it has rough nubs about an inch long with a quarter inch gap. The cutting "teeth" almost look like a bad weld job. We have found that it gums up from the roof tar.
    Halligan, pry bar, axe, again it all depends on construction
    Roof Ladder if it isn't walkable. No power tools if the roof isn't walkable.

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    Vertical ventilation is always one of several things that occurs first when it is feasible. Exactly for the same reasons that ADSN states. The only exceptions are we also do vertical ventilation in our high rises through the stairwells. Tools are tools, the basics of PPE are always a must. Power Saw, we mainly use a chain saw w/carbide tips or the new bullet chain. We also have K-12's, pick head axe, 6' hook, halligan is also a nice tool to have often, especially on a flat roof building, with a bag of utility rope if ventilation of upper floor windows is needed. We also use roof ladders on steep inclines, however, mostly we operate off an aerial device. Which many of the tools that have been stated are mounted on the aerial, or on the aerial/in the bucket.
    Generally, we breath air if the smoke condition warrants it. I do not like having my vision obscured be it by the mask or the fogging of it if I don't have to. I and many of my co-workers live by a simple rule, if you cough, your on air.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    The above is my opinion only and doesn't reflect that of any dept/agency I work for, deal with, or am a member of.

  5. #5
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    Also, Vertical Ventilation is needed for balloon frame construction with fires in the basement or where the fire got into the walls.
    I use air only if i ave to, id rather be able to see where im stepping.

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    We vertically vent when "needed", we like to do alot o horizontal venting. I don't always agree with this, but..... You know the story! Our S.O.G. has us on air when on the roof. I feel that we should be doing this, but I'm terrible about it! I have everything on and ready (which still won't do much if I fall through) I just like to have a clear view of the roof and my work area....I'm usually a hose humper, but sometimes get to ride the truck, and that truck work can be damn hard!!!! Hats off to all the truckies.....

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    Every fire that involves a room or more. Better for fire attack and life saftey issues. If not needed BC will have the truck hold up on the roof.
    "I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

    Edward F. Croker
    Chief 1899-1911
    Fire Dept. City of New York

    HOOK N' CAN of the I.A.C.O.J.

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