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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    8

    Talking Aerial refurb's Pro/Cons

    Looking for some information and experiences of those that have refurb'ed or are going to refurb their aerial ladder truck.

    Thanks


  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Elizabeth, NJ
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    42

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    The department had a 1979 Pierce/Pirsch 100' rearmount steel aerial refurbished in 1996. The cab was enclosed into a four door cab, body was refurbished and cab and body repainted. The engine and transmission were rebuilt. The aerial was reworked back to the original specification. Total cost was around $185,000. This ladder was in front line service for two years before being replaced in 1998. (Co. runs about 1700 runs a year) It now serves as a reserve ladder and is tested every other year like our other ladders. The department still can obtain parts from a company in Penn. The down side is the ladder is a 250lb. tip and the brothers like the newer 500lb. tip aerials. But if the ladder is in good shape and you can still get parts it is something to look at.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Mechanicsville VFD, MD
    Posts
    13

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    I would question the wisdom of refurbing any ladder built before 1985. That was the year NFPA changed the requirements for aerial ladder testing. Pre 1985 ladders (with a few exceptions) do not have the capabilities of today's ladders in terms of being rated at 0 angle of elevation. The 250 pound tip load mentioned in the previous post is another good example of the compromises made with the older standard ladders. Unfortunately, refurb costs are no less for the older ladders.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NORTHEAST
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    16

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    Another very important thing to look at is the safety factor of the ladder. Most manufacturers use different safety factors when rating their ladders.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Elizabeth, NJ
    Posts
    42

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    Any aerial that had been well maintained can safely be refurbished. Refurbishing is taking a safe ladder having it inspected,tested,original specification parts installed,and cleaned. A older aerial is as safe as a newer aerial if it is used within its' limitations just like the new ladder must be used within its' limitations to be safe.

    Alot of departments just want a new vehicle and when you check the working hours of the aerial you find that they basically have a new ladder. Also have found alot of departments that use their aerials are not maintaining a reserve fleet because of cost. What you find then is that the department is not maintaining their equipment properly because they do not want to take the apparatus out of service for an extended period of time unless it is absolutely necessary.

    Which is the better solution,maintain a safe reliable aerial as a reserve or have nothing!

  6. #6
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bridgton,Me USA
    Posts
    8,162

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    We rehabbed our ladder in two shots and wound up with a unit that is very serviceable but within 150-200 k of a new unit.If I had to do it over again I doubt we would for the reasons listed above.Lower tip loads,older style hydraulics,older waterways etc.It's kinda like comparing a 1957 ALF foamite to a 1997 Pierce.Is no comparison.Aerial devices have come so far in the last five years that they are far and away better than their earlier counterparts.That's my opinion,we welcome yours.T.C.

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