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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    May 2002
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    Australia
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    Question Power Spreading of Doors

    Have been researching techniques and methods worldwide for the power spreading of motor vehicle doors. I have developed a system that allows the exterior door handle to be held up during door spreading operations thus disengageing the nader bolt from the door latch. I have found using this technique that once the door handle is lifted the only force which you are spreading to get the door open is that caused by the accident damage.As most of us all know the lock and hinges are the strongest part of the door. This technique is obviously dependent on the door handle mechanism being in tact.
    Has anyone seen or currently use a similiar technique or principle to disengage the door locking mechanism during rescue operations ?.
    Does anyone have any suggestions or comments about this technique?.
    Hope to hear from some of you.
    OZRESCUE.


  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Feb 1999
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    Cleveland, NY 13042-USA
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    Lightbulb

    YES, use the interior door latch control lever. Many new cars of all price ranges have automatic Door locks, Like my wife's 2000 Ford Focus. Pulling on the exterior door handle will do nothing for you in that case. Activating the interior door handle often overrides the lock, if not deactivate the Lock then use your technique. Most cars still have tempered glass side window glazing -- So accessing the interior door controls should be relativly easy to achieve. I do agree that beating the Nader latch by using what the car gives you is a very good idea
    Last edited by Carl Avery; 05-26-2002 at 06:51 PM.
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

  3. #3
    Member
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    Jul 1999
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    Puyallup, Wa.
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    Default

    Is your "system" a device or just the techniques you refer to?? I learned the 'Nader Bypass' technique a few years ago. After ensuring the door is unlocked, you wedge open the interior and exterior latches with a wooden wedge or small piece of angle iron. Simple and easy to do.

  4. #4
    Member
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    Apr 1999
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    Vadnais Heights, MN
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    Default

    I learned a similar bypass technique about 3 or 4 years ago-but as an alternative to taking out the heavy tools when the door is jammed and only needs a quick pop. Hold the interior latch open(assuming the latch mechanism still works) and drive a wedge tool(halligan or kelly) above the nadar(just a good tap-no homerun hit needed)and the door is open. It makes sense not to have to defeat the latch/nader and vehicle crush at the same time. All 3 times I've tried it it's worked. I like to put a wedge or prop oopen the the latch all the time I work a door. It is one of the top 10 tricks I've learned, got it from the Riverland Boys-Thanks

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    May 2002
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    Australia
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    Default Wedge Sizes

    thanks for your input guy's,
    Have you found a certain size wedge that covers most of the interior handles or do you carry a selection?.
    In australia there are many differnt designs and constructions of the interior handles. That was why the device i was using is designed to work on the exterior handle as about 90% of the vehicles we work on have upward lifting exterior handles.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber rmoore's Avatar
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    Dec 1998
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    Plano, Texas
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    Default

    The previous posts are very accurate in recommending that the INTERIOR door handle be moved and held in the 'open' position. This has the potential to release the cog inside the safety latch meaning that the rescuer only is fighting the compression of the door; not the door and the latch.

    There is no guarantee however, that moving the interior door handle will actually move the cogs of the door latch. Depending upon crash damage, it may only be the linkage rods inside the door that bend, giving the feeling that the door latch mechanism has actually released. You'll know it in a real-world incident if moving the inside door latch is effective or not; there will be a definite popping sound coming from the latch if it releases.

    Regarding what it takes to hold this door handle open, the small, medium and large pieces of angle iron are OK but a small, thin wood or plastic wedge is typically the most effective. I use a plastic one that I bought that has ridges along the two surfaces to allow it to bite into the handle and stay put once shoved into place.

    What I really like about setting a wedge on the inside door latch is that it guarantees that you 'tried before you pried'. You'd be amazed how many 'jammed' doors will open when you move the inside handle.
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  7. #7
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    Default

    Ron, do you recall where you purchased the small plastic wedges you mentioned in your previous post?? Thanks.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
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    Jan 1999
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    Portland, PA, USA
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    Lightbulb

    I'll throw in my little trick, cut a variety of small wooden wedges, and cover them with double-face tape, ie. carpet tape. Make the ends long enough to hang over the edges, and trim back the tape leaving just the backing. when you place them, they tend not to move, and they adhere well to vinyl, leather and fabrics. If you remember to to grab them afterwards, just put new tape on and they are ready to reuse.

    Jim
    James Steele
    First Assistant Chief
    Portland Hook & Ladder Co. #1
    Portland , PA

  9. #9
    Member FDirish's Avatar
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    Default Excellence at it Finest

    I see once again my brothers and sisters are all thinking alike and coming up with any edge they can to do our job! I think everyone has hit it on the nose. Here is another option to consider, webbing. warap the handle with a quick hitch and then you can pull the handle to open position. The only advantage this offers is prevention of slipping wedges and has its own disadvantages as you can imagine- the main one being finding an angle to pull from. We only use the webbing if the wedges don't seem to be holding.
    celer et audax

  10. #10
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Default

    I like the sound of the wedges or angle iron to hold the handles.

    Much safer than holding open with your hands. The least amount of body parts around the tools and moving metal- the better!

    Be safe when doing this stuff....
    Luke

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