Has anyone seen photos of this thing? What are the advantages/disadvantages?

Forest officials credit brush crusher's fire protection work
AP Photo pursuing.
PRESCOTT, Ariz. (AP) - Prescott National Forest officials are
crediting a brush crusher's clearing work for helping to halt a
wildfire last month.
The modified earth-moving machine was used to clear thick
manzanita bushes and small trees from about 300 acres south of
Prescott. The growth had built up to dangerous levels during
decades of fire suppression in the nation's forests.
While several factors lined up to stop the raging Indian Fire
last month cooler temperatures of nightfall, increased humidity,
national aerial assistance at the Fire Center and years of training
the brush crushing work was one of the biggest factors, forest
officials told the Prescott Daily Courier.
"If it hadn't been done, it never would have stopped," said
Ted Pettis, an information officer from Idaho on assignment here.
When the Indian Fire hit the area where the brush crusher had
worked, it didn't have enough energy to continue downhill into the
Mountain Club or Timber Ridge, said Robert Morales, fire management
officer for the forest.
The fire began to lay down from the tree crowns, also reducing
spot fires out ahead, added Roy Fluhart, a forest fuels planner who
helps decide where the brush crusher and prescribed fires are most
needed.
In essence, the fuels reduction project allowed firefighters to
make a stand.
"I don't think everybody realizes how bad it could have been,"
Prescott National Forest Fire Management Officer Tony Sciacca said.
Without the brush crushing work, at least 600 homes surely would
have burned to the ground, Assistant Fire Management Officer Todd
Rhines said. "This crush made all the difference in the world no
ifs, ands or buts about it."
Rhines, who was operating chief on the Indian Fire, was viewing
its progress from a helicopter.

(Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press