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Thread: MCI Incidents

  1. #1
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    Default MCI Incidents

    What is the policy for your Department to declare a MCI incident?


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    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Rescue Company Point Of View...

    Being a Rescue company only, we consider it to be an MCI when there is an occupant trapped in two seperate vehicles.

    From there, we would automatically call for a back up rescue company to attend, regardless of the extent of entrapment.

    If there are multiple entrapments in a single vehicle, then we'd handle it ourselves.

    Obviously this is very different to what EMS may consider MCI, though....
    Luke

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    Member Baker FF/PM's Avatar
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    The way I understand it an MCI is anything that has the potential to overload your present resources. For example eight patients with only three ambulances available, with two patients per ambulance you need another ambulance, that is if these are all non critical patients, if there are some critical patients you may not be able to load two in an ambulance...therefore your overloaded with patients and need additional resources from mutual aid. It doesn't take a sleepy bus driver to cause this, it can be any two passenger cars with mom, dad, son, daughter in each to overload you.
    Last edited by Baker FF/PM; 06-30-2002 at 10:08 AM.
    I would...but no!

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    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Baker said it best!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    In Providence the criteria for an MCI is when 10 or more ambulances have been requested for the same incident.

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    Senior Member Dalmatian90's Avatar
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    For my department, in a predominantly rural area of Connecticut, the local hospital asks that for 5 or more patients MCI protocols be used. It's not so much that that number would normally overwhelm them, but that the head Medical Control physician figures it gives them and us practice.

    The largest change from normal procedures on these "Mini-MCIs" is the MET*TAGS come out and are used on the patients and the hospital is notified of the number of patients & size-up on their injuries & conditions, since usually there isn't a need for highly formal triage & staging set up.

    5 patients is still a rare enough event it's not used all the time, but it's a lot more frequent than a 10-12 person event that would start to seriously tax local EMS & Hospital resources in the area.

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    MembersZone Subscriber N2DFire's Avatar
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    Paraphrasing what baker said.

    Any incident in which the number of Pt's. involved will overwhelm the responding units.

    For example a standard dispatch for a structure fire will be 2 Fire Companies (Bringing anywhere from 4 to 6 units) and 1 Ambulance.

    IF that ambulance arrives on scene to find a family of 6 all suffering burns & smoke inhalation then that is (by definition) a MCI because that 1 Ambulance & Crew may not be able to adequately treat 6 Pt's.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
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    I am the EMS capt in a very rural fire dept in PA, and I learned early on that a MCI isn't just a plane crash, or bus accident. Not long after I became an EMT, we had a vehicle accident involving 2 cars and a mini-van. This yeilded 15 pts. The accident its self was rather simple...the minivan didn't see the breaklights of the car in front of it, causing a chain reaction. Unfortunatly, on the mini van, there were 6 kids, all suffering injuries, ranging from minor to serious. We also had a pregnant driver in the first car. I had never encountered anything like that, and I happen to come across it by accident. so, being the only medically trained person on scene for a few minutes, I was running around a little crazy. But, it was a learning experience, and something I still think about when considering box alarms and things.

    Be safe.
    Life isn't a dress rehearsal, it's for keeps out there.

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    Our SOG's basically mirror Baker & Dalmation90, any incident which would tax the local (first due) transport resources. Which roughly makes out to anything more then 5 patients. That also doesn't mean that 3 or 4 critical patients wouldn't be classified as an MCI either. The MCI declaration basically brings in more resources, lets our dispatch know that we are dealing with multiple patients and they begin calling area hospitals once we notify them the amount of patients, medevac's & coordinates with the county to get us at least 1 commuter bus for walking wounded. We usually average 1 or 2 incidents per month that involves more then 5 patients. The most recent was a school bus accidident with 32 students, the driver and 2 teachers. None were critical, 6 delayed, and 29 green. Our primary hospital handled all 35 patients.

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    MembersZone Subscriber ramseycl's Avatar
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    For the two years that I have been with this rural department we have not has any MCI, yet. There are three department in my county and they all very closely together on these kind of calls. When they hear another district get paged out for something that sounds serious, the next department over will start to roll, no lights or sirens, just to be close if needed.

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