Thread: New Mexico

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    Post New Mexico

    Not much heard about New Mexico...but they've got some fierce blazes too.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    SILVER CITY, N.M. (AP) - Firefighters in the Bootheel of New
    Mexico worked toward containment of a steadily growing 10,580-acre
    fire Sunday as two other Bootheel blazes grew and combined into one
    2,000-acre fire.
    The Walnut Complex, which had been measured at 6,400 acres
    Saturday, exceeded 10,500 by sundown Sunday, fire information
    officer Roland Gillen said. The fire was burning in the Gray Ranch
    area on private land and Bureau of Land Management allotments, fire
    officials said. No buildings were threatened, Gillen said.
    The Parachute Adams Fire, reported as contained earlier Sunday,
    burned into the so-called Beadhead Fire and combined for a total of
    2,000 acres north of Cloverdale. None of the Bootheel fires was
    considered contained by nightfall, Gillen said.
    The Walnut Complex, in turn, was comprised of the Walnut, Center
    and Woolly Bugger fires, as several fires burned together during
    the weekend.
    The Parachute Adams, Beadhead and Woolly Bugger are named after
    trout-fishing flies.
    "I don't know why they're naming them after flies," Gillen
    said. "Those fires - they're all in desert country."
    Just north of the Bootheel, the southwestern corner of the
    state, 23 lightning fires were whittled down to six active fires
    Sunday on the Gila National Forest, Gillen said. Seventeen were
    contained and controlled, he said.
    In the Four Corners area near Arizona, a 250-acre fire burned in
    Navajo country about 20 miles west of Shiprock, tribal police said
    Sunday. About 45 firefighters battled that blaze, centered in the
    remote Carrizo Mountains near the Arizona-New Mexico state line,
    said Navajo Nation police Sgt. Dave Johnson.
    Johnson said the fire, believed started by lightning, burned
    along the base of the mountains toward a remote sheep camp near Red
    Rock, Ariz.
    There were no injuries and no structures threatened, he said,
    and no word on when the fire might be contained.
    The largest of the lightning blazes on the Gila were the
    Skeleton Fire, which consumed 40 acres, and the 33-acre Brothers
    Fire southwest of Beaverhead on the Gila Wilderness.
    The Trampas Fire continued to burn through the Pecos Wilderness
    in northern New Mexico Sunday. That fire was 70 percent contained
    and holding at about 5,655 acres, forest spokeswoman Dolores Maese
    said.
    The 7,420-acre Tejon Fire north of Vaughn was declared 100
    percent contained Saturday.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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    Post July 2nd New Mexico status

    ILVER CITY, N.M. (AP) - Hundreds of firefighters and a fleet of
    air tankers have been waging war on several wildfires from New
    Mexico's remote Bootheel north to the Navajo reservation.
    The Walnut Complex has charred an estimated 21,120 acres of
    grass and brush in the far southwestern corner of the state. Fire
    information officer Loretta Ray said Tuesday that fire officials
    were using global positioning system technology to better determine
    the size of the fire.
    Cooler temperatures and higher relative humidity at night have
    caused the fire to burn more slowly after sundown, Ray said. The
    blaze is 25 percent contained.
    And in the Four Corners area, the Carrizo One wildfire burned
    more than 3,000 acres as of late Tuesday, said fire information
    officer Kim Hunter. The fire was burning about 15 miles south of
    Teec Nos Pos in Arizona.
    Very steep terrain and extreme fire behavior have hampered
    suppression efforts. The fire was burning unchecked with no
    estimate of containment, officials said.
    "It's extremely steep and the access is very limited," Hunter
    said. "We've been having to fly crews in to helipad points and
    then they're hiking in from there."
    On Tuesday, firefighters worked on a line on the west side of
    the blaze while other crews conducted burnouts adjacent to the fire
    line to deprive the blaze of fuel.
    Hunter said firefighters are trying to build a safe anchor point
    at the base of the fire from where they can attack.
    "Fire crews can then safely attack the left and right flanks
    without fear of the fire coming up from behind them," she said.
    "Safety is a top priority."
    More than 450 people, five helicopters, four air tankers, 10
    engines and three water tenders were assigned to the fire.
    The fire, which officials believe was sparked Friday by
    lightning, was not threatening any structures.
    In southern New Mexico, the lightning-sparked Walnut Complex was
    about 60 miles south of Lordsburg. No buildings were threatened,
    officials said.
    Fire crews have been burning out from existing roads and trails
    to confine the blaze. They were helped by seven engines, on
    helicopter, two water tenders and a single-engine air tanker.
    Just north of the Bootheel, in the southwestern corner of the
    state the Skeleton Fire consumed 75 acres 10 miles northeast of
    Glenwood, officials said. It was 90 percent contained Tuesday and
    no structures were threatened.
    The Cub Fire, also in southern New Mexico, grew Tuesday to 900
    acres. It was burning heavy timber about 19 miles east of Glenwood.
    No structures were threatened.
    Ray said fire activity swelled Tuesday afternoon, forcing 34
    firefighters off the line and the evacuation of a lookout tower.
    She said the fire repeatedly made runs to the southeast and spotted
    in several directions.
    Strong winds hampered the air attack early Tuesday. Fire
    officials concentrated on shuttling crews off the fire lines later
    in the day when the winds slowed down, Ray said.
    The Trampas Fire, which burned 4,771 acres three miles east of
    Cowles in the Pecos Wilderness, was 100 percent contained, forest
    spokeswoman Dolores Maese said. The fire, which started June 16 by
    lightning, forced evacuations of 21 families in two canyons for a
    day.

    ---
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    Default Update

    SILVER CITY, N.M. (AP) - Firefighters battling several wildfires
    in southwestern New Mexico have had to contend with erratic fire
    behavior, high winds and rugged terrain.
    The Cub Fire, which has burned more than 1,000 acres east of
    Glenwood, has been turned over to a Type II management team,
    meaning the blaze has become a priority for firefighters.
    Fire information officer Karen Lightfoot said winds picked up as
    thunderstorms moved into the area Wednesday but there were no
    reports of rain on the fire.
    Lightfoot said officials estimate that the fire may have burned
    up to 5,000 acres but that will have to be determined through more
    accurate mapping.
    Crews assigned to the nearby Skeleton Fire, which was contained
    Wednesday at 71 acres, have started work on the Cub Fire. Both
    blazes were sparked by lightning, officials said.
    In New Mexico's remote Bootheel, firefighters are getting a
    better handle on the Walnut Complex, which has burned 21,207 acres
    since being sparked by lightning last week.
    "It's looking really good," fire information officer Roland
    Giller said.
    Crews burned out areas around the fire and worked on a line
    around the fire. The fire was 35 percent contained, Giller said.
    Two smaller fires were also discovered in the Gila National
    Forest. Giller said one engine was dispatched to the T.J. Fire near
    the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument and a crew of
    firefighters was sent to the Ten Cow Fire burning 35 miles east of
    Glenwood.
    Another blaze, the Byers Fire, has burned about 40 acres west of
    Truth or Consequences. Smoke-jumpers from Albuquerque and 19
    firefighters have been trying to contained that fire.
    And in the Four Corners area, the Carrizo One wildfire burned
    3,680 acres, said fire information officer Kim Hunter. The fire was
    burning about 15 miles south of Teec Nos Pos in Arizona.
    Crews made sagNmficant progress Wednesday, Hunter said. The fire
    was 40 percent contained.
    The fire area did get a little rain Wednesday, but it was not
    enough to make a dent in the blaze. Officials said, however, that
    resulting humidity was expected to help firefighters' efforts.
    ---
    On the Net:
    U.S. Forest Service: http://www.fs.fed.us./r3/fire

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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    Post July 8th

    SILVER CITY, N.M. (AP) - Firefighters battling a 13,180-acre
    wildfire in the Gila Wilderness were getting a little help from
    rain and higher humidity.
    The lightning-sparked Cub Fire is still about four miles
    southeast of a woodland subdivision of about 60 houses called
    Willow Creek, said fire information officer Roland Giller.
    The fire's spread was moderate Monday thanks to rainfall over
    much of the burn area. A weather station near the fire registered a
    hundredth of an inch of rain, Giller said.
    "Even the parts that don't receive precipitation, an increase
    in higher humidity really helps to reduce fire spread," he said.
    The Gila Hotshots, with help from a fire engine and two dump
    trucks, were clearing brush and thinning trees to create a line
    between the fire and the subdivision.
    Two helicopters shuttled firefighters to the lines and made
    bucket drops on the blaze Monday, Giller said.
    Willow Creek, nestled in the Mogollon Mountains, consists of
    mostly summer homes and a few year-round residents, Giller said.
    Residents there were urged to evacuate voluntarily Wednesday.
    The fire, burning mixed conifer and ponderosa pine trees,
    remained within 1 miles of the Mogollon Baldy lookout station,
    which was evacuated last week.
    The Cub Fire was first reported June 30.
    Officials said more than 100 fires have been staffed this year
    on the Gila National Forest. During the past few days, several
    small fires in the Gila were contained.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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