Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Virginia Situation

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Virginia's relentless drought is burning up
    farmers' crops, drying up streams and ponds and posing a threat of
    wildfires throughout most of the state, according to a government
    report.
    The Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force's latest monthly
    report shows that most of the state is severely dry and getting
    drier with no relief expected in the near future.
    Statewide, rainfall during June was 37 percent below normal, the
    report said.
    "The occurrence of a period of virtually no rainfall during the
    two weeks around the first day of summer ... has resulted in a
    rapid increase in drought severity throughout most of central
    Virginia."
    Overall, said task force chairman Terry Wagner, "We're seeing
    the potential for some pretty significant agricultural impacts."
    Wagner said Tuesday that his discussions with agriculture
    experts and his observations traveling around Virginia lead him to
    conclude that "even if we started getting normal rainfall today,
    we've already got damage to the corn crop."
    Wagner said most recharging of groundwater takes place during
    the winter, when plants aren't drawing water out of the soil and
    the sun isn't evaporating as much of the precipitation. So rainfall
    in the immediate future wouldn't do much to solve the larger
    problem, he said.
    Another member of the task force, the Virginia Cooperative
    Extension Service, also noted that corn and soybeans in particular
    are being stunted by the dry conditions and heat.
    "Without significant sustained rainfall soon, the agricultural
    situation in Virginia will continue to deteriorate, creating major
    problems for farmers over most of the state," according to the
    report.
    The Virginia Department of Forestry noted that it has
    "responded to 1,252 wildfires for over 10,717 acres" so far this
    year, well above the long-term average for such fires.
    "The agency is particularly concerned about the potential for a
    severe fall fire season," the report said. "Current long-term
    predictions indicate that the fall wildfire season in Virginia has
    the potential be even more severe than what was experienced last
    fall."
    Worst-hit has been the Shenandoah Valley, the report said.
    "Farmers in this area report that corn is drying up in the field
    and dying and that some springs are drying up for the first time in
    25 years," according to the report.
    Also suffering badly is the Roanoke Valley, where "agricultural
    drought conditions are critical," the report said, and central
    Virginia, where "ponds and streams are extremely low." Even in
    relatively moist northern Virginia, "two weeks of hot, dry weather
    could dramatically increase agricultural drought impacts."
    Nineteen counties have received or are seeking federal disaster
    status, which enables their farmers to get low-interest loans and
    other financial assistance.
    Goochland and Prince Edward counties have received disaster
    designation, and Gov. Mark R. Warner has submitted requests for
    Augusta, Bedford, Bland, Brunswick, Buckingham, Cumberland,
    Fluvanna, Louisa, Nelson, Orange, Page, Rockbridge, Rockingham and
    Wythe counties.
    Campbell, Franklin and Pittsylvania counties are preparing
    applications.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com


  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Update

    July 11th
    (Luray-AP) -- Officials say the Shenandoah National Park fire
    has spread westward onto adjacent private property. Park
    information officer Julena Campbell says the fire -- which has
    burned about 19-hundred acres -- jumped containment lines on
    Tuesday and burned about 80 wooded acres of private property. NO
    buildings have been threatened.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts