Thread: Nevada Heats up

  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Nevada Heats up

    RENO, Nev. (AP) - Forest Service officials imposed new fire
    restrictions in the Sierra and utilities reported record use of
    electricity as a heat wave kept its grip on California and Nevada
    Thursday with triple-digit highs, including another 108 degrees in
    Reno.
    The Tahoe National Forest, north and west of Lake Tahoe, ordered
    the new restrictions in place effective Friday prohibiting
    campfires except in fire rings and developed campgrounds and other
    designated sites.
    The action follows the lead of the Plumas National Forest to the
    north and the agency's Tahoe Basin management unit surrounding the
    lake, both of which cited dry conditions in issuing fire
    restrictions at the first of this month.
    High temperature readings topped 100 degrees for the third day
    in a row Thursday across most of northern Nevada.
    For the second straight day, Reno reached its all-time record
    high of 108 degrees. It marked the third day in a row the city has
    smashed its previous record for the date. The record for July 11
    had been just 101, set in 1917 and 1964.
    Until Wednesday, the hottest it had ever been in Reno was 106
    degrees on July 20, 1931, based on record-keeping dating to 1872.
    The hottest spot in Nevada Thursday was Lovelock at 110 degrees.
    Winnemucca and Gerlach checked in at 109 and Fallon at 108. It was
    107 degrees at Fernley, Hawthorne and Yerington -- all hotter than
    Las Vegas at 106.
    Others above the century mark included Carson City 104, Elko
    103, Wendover 102 and Eureka 101.
    Unusually high readings in the upper 80s and 90s also continued
    at the typically cooler mountain areas around Tahoe, including 97
    degrees at Truckee, Calif., and 91 degrees at South Lake Tahoe,
    Calif.
    Sierra Pacific Power Co. said it's 315,000 customers in Nevada
    and the Lake Tahoe area were using an all-time record amount of
    electricity.
    The high demand reached a record 1,585 megawatts at 5 p.m. on
    Wednesday, eclipsing the old mark of 1,529 megawatts set last Aug.
    7, due to increased use of air conditioning, irrigation pumps and
    continued customer growth, said Bruce Bullock, the Reno-based
    utility's executive director of distribution operations.
    Tahoe National Forest Supervisor Steve Eubanks pleaded with
    campers, hikers and other visitors to use extreme caution in the
    tinder-dry woods of the northern Sierra.
    "Forest vegetation is very dry and firefighters and equipment
    are stretched thin throughout the West," Eubanks said Thursday.
    Abandoned campfires, which sparked a pair of big fires in the
    region last summer, remain a serious concern, he said.
    "I am dismayed at the number of abandoned campfires that are
    being left by recreationists throughout the forest," Eubanks said.
    The Martis fire near Reno and the Gap fire along U.S. Interstate
    80 near Emigrant Gap burned a total of 17,000 acres last year.
    "We can't afford to have these wildfires burn thousands of
    acres of forest because of carelessness," Eubanks said.
    Under the Forest Service fire restrictions, smoking is allowed
    only within an enclosed vehicle. Woodcutting is allowed only on
    roads and trails.
    All internal combustion engines including chain saws and
    off-road vehicles also are required to remain on roads or
    designated trails.
    Portable stoves are permitted in the backcountry with a valid
    campfire permit.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Lost Cabin

    LAS VEGAS (AP) - Firefighters were battling southern Nevada's
    first major wildfire of the season Sunday that forced residents
    from their homes in a remote, drought-stricken area about 50 miles
    west of Las Vegas.
    The Lost Cabin fire in the Spring Mountains' Lovell Pass had
    burned about 300 acres after smoke was spotted around 2:25 p.m.,
    Bureau of Land Management spokesman Phil Guerrero said.
    "This is what we've been fearing and anticipating all along,"
    he said.
    At least four mobile homes and a ranch owned by a Las Vegas
    developer were evacuated as the fire jumped a nearby road about
    4:40 p.m., Guerrero said. It was not known how many people were
    evacuated from the CC Springs mobile home park or the Torrino
    Ranch. No injuries were reported.
    BLM officials suspected the blaze was sparked on U.S. Forest
    Service land by a lightning storm that passed through the area
    Saturday night. Approaching thunderstorms were expected to produce
    more dry lightning Sunday.
    The blaze, pushed by 15-20 mph winds combined with triple-digit
    temperatures and low humidity, continued to grow rapidly, Guerrero
    said.
    "This thing is pretty explosive," he said, adding there was no
    estimate of when the fire might be contained.
    Three, 20-person handcrews from the BLM, Forest Service and
    National Park Service were ordered to the fire about 55 miles
    southeast of Pahrump and a lead plane along with three fire tankers
    were ordered from Minden and California. But officials fear those
    tankers might not be available because they are busy elsewhere in
    the West, Guerrero said.
    "Right now there's a struggle for resources because there are
    other fires in the Sierras," he said. "We're working spot fires
    using a helicopter."
    Six engines from the federal land management agencies, three
    12-person firefighting squads from the Nevada Division of Forestry
    at Indian Springs and four rural fire units from the Clark County
    Fire Department also were dispatched to help fight the blaze,
    Guerrero said.
    State Highway 160 between Las Vegas and Pahrump was congested
    with onlookers and Las Vegas police blocked off access to some
    roads, including the Lovell Canyon Road, leading to the fire,
    authorities said.
    High fire danger warnings have been in effect for the area since
    Thursday because of winds, humidity, high temperatures and extreme
    drought conditions, Guerrero said.
    "The moisture level in these trees is drier than the lumber you
    would buy at Home Depot," he said. "We knew this day would come
    and now it's here."

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  3. #3
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post Upadte 7/15

    TOPAZ LAKE, Nev. (AP) - Hundreds of additional firefighters
    joined the battle Monday against a 10,000-acre wildfire whose
    swirling flames forced evacuations and sent crews scurrying to
    safety near the Nevada-California line.
    "The fire is blowing up again. It is really very scary," fire
    information officer Sharon Soule said from a command post in
    Coleville, Calif.
    About 30 guests were forced to flee the Topaz Lodge
    hotel-casino, joining about 200 residents evacuated Sunday. As many
    as 250 homes and 25 other buildings were threatened.
    "We think it is best to get out of here," hotel-casino general
    manager Rick Ross said Monday as flames crested a ridge a half-mile
    away.
    Sparked by lightning Friday, the fire grew 20-fold Sunday as
    high wind mixed with low humidity and temperatures in the mid-90s.
    "The combination just absolutely made that fire explode," fire
    spokesman Tom Crawford said.
    On Monday, the fire pushed a plume of smoke into the sky visible
    75 miles away in Reno. With red lights flashing and sirens blaring,
    40 fire engines from across the state raced to join 533
    firefighters on the line.
    "When you get pinon pine and juniper as dry as this, the fire
    is going to carry through the crowns of those trees probably faster
    than you could walk or run," said Mark Struble, a Bureau of Land
    Management fire spokesman.
    The fire generated tornado-like funnels of flame, prompting an
    immediate pullback by fire crews.
    "It looks like a huge thunderhead. It's already raining ash,"
    Crawford said.
    The fire was estimated to be 10 percent contained. Blazes
    covering 150 and 410 acres were burning nearby as part of the same
    complex.
    The fire burned through power lines, leaving the small tourist
    town of Coleville without power. Many residents who rely on
    electric pumps were without water.
    In central Oregon, crews using bulldozers, pickaxes and
    helicopters seemed to be winning their battle Monday against a
    17,000-acre wildfire, helped by cooler temperatures, humidity and
    reduced wind.
    Residents began returning to a rural subdivision where
    firefighters were able to keep the fire from consuming all but 18
    of 280 homes. Full containment was possible by the end of the week,
    fire officials said.
    Looking at burned trees inches away from his mobile home, Larry
    Penrod said it was a miracle the fire hadn't taken it.
    "How it didn't burn I'll never know," he said.
    In southwestern Colorado, 25 homes remained evacuated as searing
    temperatures, low humidity and erratic winds pushed a 27,000-acre
    fire near the tiny communities of Norwood and Redvale.
    The National Interagency Fire Center said wildfires have charred
    3.3 million acres so far this year, more than double the 10-year
    average.
    ---
    On the Net:
    Northwest wildfire updates: http://www.or.blm.gov/nwcc
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  4. #4
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Post

    Major fires burning Monday in and around Nevada:
    Gates complex: near Topaz Lake 70 miles southeast of Reno,
    10,560 acres, 10 percent contained, started Friday. (Includes
    Coleville fire, 150 acres; Gate fire, 410 acres; Slinkard fire
    10,000 acres).
    Mud Springs fire: 40 miles northwest of Winnemucca, 4,000 acres,
    100 percent contained Sunday.
    Eagle fire: Nevada-Utah line 50 miles southeast of Ely, 10,000
    acres, no containment estimate; started Thursday.
    Buckeye fire: Pine Nut Mountains 15 miles east of Gardnerville,
    1,500 acres, 5 percent contained; started Saturday.
    Ellsworth fire: 50 miles southeast of Fallon and 8 miles
    northeast of Gabbs, 1,200 acres, 10 percent contained; started
    Saturday.
    Belmont fire: 20 miles south of Jiggs, 640 acres, 25 percent
    contained; started Saturday.
    Cold Springs fire: 20 miles southwest of Lund, 600 acres, 100
    percent contained Sunday; started Saturday.
    Adobe fire: 3 miles north of Elko, 500 acres, 100 percent
    contained on Sunday; started Saturday.
    Pan fire: 12 miles north of Bridgeport, Calif., 250 acres, 20
    percent contained; started Friday.
    Pony Trail fire: Pine Valley, 100 acres, 45 percent contained,
    started Sunday.
    Lost Cabin fire: 50 miles west of Las Vegas, 1,500 acres, no
    containment, started Sunday.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register