1. #1
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    Question vehicle extracation specialist

    I would like to know if anyone can help me with information on becoming a vehicle extracation specialist and what the differance is from being a tech.

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    Krashtec,

    NFPA 1670, Chapter 6 will give you most of the information you need.

    Tim
    www.rescue42.com

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    Default Re: vehicle extracation specialist

    Originally posted by krashtec
    I would like to know if anyone can help me with information on becoming a vehicle extracation specialist
    It might be a good start to get the spelling correct ... I really enjoy going to motorsports response training for non-fire workers and hear them talk about "vehicle extraction" training. I guess they don't extract patients from vehicles, they prefer to save the vehicles instead???
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    Attend and particpate in as much training as possible!

    Attend and particpate in as many extrication calls as possible!

    Grasshopper, one can not leave the temple of the extrication technician and become an extrication specialist without first being able to remove doors with your bare hands. Only then Grasshopper, are you ready to travel the highway of life and the U.S. in search of the tricky extrication...
    Luke

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    Originally posted by lutan
    Attend and particpate in as much training as possible!

    Attend and particpate in as many extrication calls as possible!

    Grasshopper, one can not leave the temple of the extrication technician and become an extrication specialist without first being able to remove doors with your bare hands. Only then Grasshopper, are you ready to travel the highway of life and the U.S. in search of the tricky extrication...

    Well said, the more training you attend the better you will handle the tricky calls and when you think you have had enough training train some more. You will find some so-called extrication gods out there who have had only the slightest amount of training who will say you need only take this class or that class but, only you can know when you are ready for that early morning call MVA with entrappment when you roll up on the scene and look and know what has to be done without further injuring the patients.



    "When I'm done training I'll be 6 feet under"


    Robert Bowman
    Haddon Fire Co. #1
    NJ-TF1

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    "When I'm done training I'll be 6 feet under"
    That'd be the best bit of advice I've ever heard NJ-TF1
    Luke

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    Krashtech,

    These other guys here hit it on the head for ya. You have to train, train and train. There is an enormous amount of information found on the internet too. Come to this forums (and others) and participate in the discussions and scenarios. Go to your nearest "Junk Yard" and ask the owners if you (and your rescue company) can come down and train on a regular basis. If they know why your doing it they should not have a problem. Invite guys (at other stations) who might know more than you about extrication to come over and train with you. There are also extrication competitions regionally (one example look here: www.terc.org ) that you most certainly would get good cutting time and see techniques. If you see or hear about "nasty" wrecks with complex extrications. Discuss and critique them yourself. In other words learn from others experiences (as well as your own). Nuff-Said

    JW
    "Making Sense with Common Sense"
    Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
    ( MVRC@comcast.net) Jordan Sr.

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    A Posting From Forum Moderator Ron Moore

    Actually, in the U.S., the NFPA 1670 technical standard defines differences between three levels of competency; awareness, operations and technician level.

    NFPA 1670 Awareness level technical rescue functions inlcude;
    competenccies of Chapter 2 of NFPA 472 (HazMat)
    (a) Procedures to conduct a size-up
    (b) Procedures for identification of the resources necessary
    (c) Procedures for implementing the emergency response system
    (d) Procedures for implementing site control and scene management
    (e) Recognition of general hazards

    That's it for the Awareness level.
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

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    NFPA 1670 "Operations Level"

    Procedures to identify probable victim locations and survivability

    Procedures for making the rescue area safe, including stabilization and lock out/tag out"

    Safely undertaking disentanglement and/or extrication operations using hand tools

    ventilating the rescue area and monitoring its atmosphere

    Supporting any unbroken utilities

    Providing protective equipment for any victims, if possible, when necessary

    Prohibiting entry into an unsafe vehicle and/or machinery rescue area

    Preventing the touching or operating of equipment or machinery involved until its safety has been established

    Procedures to identify, contain, and stop fuel release

    Procedures for the protection of a victim during extrication/disentanglement

    Procedures for the packaging of a victim prior to extrication and/or disentanglement

    Procedures for accessing victims trapped in a vehicle and/or machinery

    Procedures for the mitigation and management of general and specific hazards

    Procedures for the procurement and utilization of the resources necessary to conduct safe and effective vehicle and/or machinery rescue operations

    Procedures for maintaining control of traffic at the scene of vehicle and/or machinery rescue incidents

    Procedures for performing extrication and disentanglement operations involving packaging, treating, and removing victims trapped in vehicles and/or machinery through the use of hand tools. In order to perform a safe disentanglement and/or extrication operation, training shall be provided on the following topics:
    Types of passenger restraint systems

    The frame and construction features of vehicles

    Types of suspension systems in vehicles

    Types and classification of impacts

    Categories of mechanical injury

    Various stabilization techniques

    Center of gravity and its relationship to rollover

    Use of cribbing and chocks

    Building a box crib

    Types and examples of levers for mechanical advantage

    Proper and effective use of hand tools including;
    hammer,

    pry bar,

    hack saw,

    glass punch,

    Halligan,

    knife/belt cutter,

    cable cutter, and

    come-a-long

    Disentanglement through primary access points

    Patient packaging prior to removal from a vehicle and/or machine

    Protecting the victim during extrication and/or disentanglement operations
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

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    NFPA 1670 "Technician Level" competencies includes;

    extrication and disentanglement operations involving packaging, treating, and removing victims injured and/or trapped in large heavy vehicles and/or machinery.

    training must be provided on the following topics:
    Frame and construction features of heavy/large vehicles and machinery

    rescue chain assembly

    lifting bags

    wire rope

    weight estimation

    lifting and/or moving large objects

    cribbing and chocks with large and heavy objects

    Use of commercial heavy wreckers

    manual and power winches

    lifting devices that use mechanical advantage principles

    power tools including hydraulic, pneumatic, and electrical spreading, cutting, lifting, and ram-type tools

    Disentanglement through both primary and secondary access points through the use of available power tools

    Protecting the victim

    Lock out/tag out of machinery

    Identification and use of various sling configurations

    Technician level competencies also includes advanced stabilization of what the NFPA calls 'unusual vehicle and/or machinery rescue situations'. The Standard defines 'unusual' as cars on their tops, cars on their side, and cars on top of other cars, trucks, and large commercial vehicles.

    The Standards states that advanced stabilization includes techniques using chains, cables, jack devices, and cribbing/shoring to stabilize vehicles of any size.

    Technician-level personnel also should be able to use of all specialized rescue equipment immediately available and in use by the organization. This equipment includes hydraulic, air, and electrical tools for spreading, cutting, lifting, as well as use of ram-type tools
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

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    So Ron, Do you think a structural collapse course (like the one taught by TEEX at disaster city) would follow along the same lines as the Technician level? It just seems that all of the requirements are covered by the differnt skills that are taught in that course. I don't see that big of a differnce between stabilizing a 5,000lbs vehicle vs. a 5,000 chunk of concrete.

    BTW, The structural class covers: Lifting and moving, breaching and breaking, stabilization and cribbing, and crane operations.
    All comments are the opinion of the author, and not of any service they are a member of.

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    And when you're all fat and happy with that,you go see Grandmaster Billy and begin your "bridge"to Heavy Vehicle Rescue(Big Rig Rescue)or BRR for short.Billy has been in the presence of the Grandest Master of all(Bill Jackson)and has learned his lessons well.I'm off to Concord Fri. to continue my discipleship under Billy's tutorial.Promises to be a informational fun filled weekend,and a lot of work.To be a "specialist"is going to take a gadzillion hours.I don't think Ron Moore considers himself a specialist,and the only way I'd go into competition with him is on BRR,never cars or light trucks.Spend time here,the talents of the regular posters will do much to help you,a lot of REAL clever people here.T.C.

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