Thread: Truckie Tricks!

  1. #1
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    Cool Truckie Tricks!

    hey. Anybody got any good truckie tricks on like, entry, ventilation, hopscotchin over engine guys, or just about anything involved with ladder stuff? c'mon, you jakes, teach the young guy! stay safe, peace.
    Matt G. Warminster Fire Dept. Station 90
    IAFF Local F-106

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    hmmmmmmm..

    My truckies used to load up the compartments with a minimum 2 "Cans" per person on the truck so they could at least scoop the original knockdown from the engine crew.......not that I ever did that or condoned it... ...but....man o man...do you realize how much fire you can fight with one of them if you do it right?
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
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    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
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    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

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    We keep at least 800 pounds of truckie on the truck at all times.
    Michael "Mick" Mayers
    Acting Director, Urban Search and Rescue
    South Carolina Emergency Response Task Force
    www.sctf1.sc.gov

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    Lightbulb Some items....

    Offen I see FFs cutting a triangle opening to access
    a roll up door. Then an Instructor told me once to take
    a few extra seconds and cut a "rainbow" design to
    give personnel MORE ROOM to walk in carrying equipment,
    etc and pass each other. Guess what..IT WORKS!

    ALSO....This is a biggie, I dont see a lot of FFs
    doing...START THE CHAIN SAW BEFORE GOING UP ON
    THE ROOF. (on the ground) Why?

    1. You know the saw will work once you get top side.
    2. It is now warmed up and will start on the first
    pull.

    ALSO- This is something I thought of myself. Once I
    get on the roof, I will sound the immediate area to
    a point. (4-5 feet around me). I will then lay the
    tool to the edge of where I sounded and assist the
    Firefighters coming up and I tell them- "Roof sounded
    to the tool." NOW..they know it is sounded and how far
    they can travel until we sound again.

    MORE- Do NOT "cross country" across a roof when up
    on it. Walk the main supports like perlins, beams,
    rafters, etc.

    ALSO- I always carry 10-12 feet of webbing with me
    and some caribeaners. They are a great, multi-purpose
    tool. You can tie stuff off, lower stuff and use as a
    FF rescue device. (pull, drag, etc) I carry one roll in
    my coat and one in my turnouts. Learn how to use the
    webbing to carry up a chain saw vs. dragging with your
    hand. Webbing can also be used for SAR. I can extend
    out from my partner and still be attached to him.

    STILL MORE- I carry black (any color will do) construction
    crayon in my coat. I can mark anything- doors, walls, a USAR
    matrix, draw "X" for a room search...numerous possibilities.
    I also carry a little metal door jam. I can drop it in an
    open door. Wood stops are nice, but this works better I
    think.

    AND- A little personal rope drop bag is nice. You can haul
    equipment. All kinds of uses, I cant even list them all.

    ALSO- I like to put a BIG flashlight at the door for two
    reasons-
    1. It will keep the exit door open if it happens to close.
    2. The activated light will show me my exit out.


    Hope those help out...Being that I am from Cali, I'll
    probably take some slack...bring it on....
    Last edited by CAFFBOU; 07-30-2002 at 12:09 AM.

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    hopscotchin over engine guys
    Just remember after you jump over the Engine "FIREFIGHTERS", clear any kinks you see on your way down the stairs

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    clear any kinks you see on your way down the stairs
    LMFAO Artie, nice one.

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    Thumbs up You clowns are WEAK...

    You back East Wallys let me down. I threw up some goodies
    and you just talk about kinks in a line. Come'on you
    "crustie vets"....throw some tricks up, I wanna learn
    something too.....

    California Boy talking smack.....BoukCA
    Last edited by CAFFBOU; 07-29-2002 at 11:28 PM.

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    Default Truckie tricks

    If entering into a smoke filled commercial structure, Take a 6 or better yet 10 ft hook put it over your head before advancing and feel the pike with a gloved hand, if it's hot to the touch you have alot of heat over head, consider whats burning over your head, you have alot more going on that just a small smokey contents fire.The 10ft hook can displace ceiling tiles so you can see if fire is traveling overhead as well.
    Notch your hooks with finger depressions, a wood rasp or grinder works well. It will enhance your grip and it will reference the direction of the pike of your hook in a heavy smoke condition. Great training aide .
    carry 10 penny nails as door chocks there cheap take up very little room and who cares if you someone walks away with them afterwards. works great on wood doors, just place the point in the edge of the door and the head against the jam, the stop moulding will hold it in place.
    When doing your outside survey, especially at commerical buildings take a line of sight at the corner of the building, if the front wall is out of plumb get the information out quickly,you may save the lives of many. A periodic check is also warranted.
    "Knowledge is Power"
    Bill Y

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    Cool hey, engine lt!!

    hey, what do engine guys do while they wait for the truckies to let em in??? stand around holdin their hoses!!!!! just kiddn lt!
    Matt G. Warminster Fire Dept. Station 90
    IAFF Local F-106

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    what do engine guys do while they wait for the truckies to let em in
    90 truck,
    I'll give you several answers. Choose any that apply:

    1. Turn the knob and open the door.

    2. Bandage the wounds on the poor guy who was holding the Halligan.

    3. Shoot a quick load in the hall from their hose. (at least they have a hose )

    4. Mediate the inevitable argument which will erupt between the FE crew.

    5. Leave a path for them to get by so they don't hopscotch over us on their way out!

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    I like my seat on R..you guy's agrue at the door

    In the mean time seee yaaaaa'ssss

    FTM, PTB, RFB
    FDNY 343

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    Default 2 Tools!!!

    Carry 2 tools......You pick 'em.
    I carry a 6' roof hook & a Halligan.



    .....Oh yeah,
    Take a short ladder (scuttle, combo....)
    So you can help the Engine guys over the CURB!!!!!

    FTM-PTB
    trk4

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    Default Re: 2 Tools!!!

    Originally posted by gfdtrk4
    Carry 2 tools......You pick 'em.
    I carry a 6' roof hook & a Halligan.


    [/B]
    Wow, 2 tools? How do you carry the hose, oh never mind...

    Hey Engine LT, ROTFL, that's great.

    FDNYL133, thanks, I will remeber those tips, very usefull! I really like the pike poll tip. (pun not intended!)

    When considering whether to request to join a truck or engine company an old chief of mine gave me this advice..."You have to be crazy to run into a burning building. You have to be nuts to do so without bringing water"

    Here's one I just learned. If you have a TIC, when opening a door always look up at door way to see if there is a heat bank in the next room rolling out into your room/outsides indicating a hot growing fire. You can see it real well right after opening a door, not so well after the door's been open for a while. It can tell you which direction the heat (and probably the seat of the fire) is coming from.

    Another I picked up from an engine Lt, carry a shingler's hammer (looks like a tomahawk). It's a lot cheaper than some of those truckie tools you see in the catologes, works just as well, goes through sheet rock without knocking the clapboards off the exterior, is a lot easier to swing than a fire axe when checking for extention, and if you lose it you're only out $9.95(available now, for an unlimited time at your local Sears or Home Depot!). Also doubles (go figure) as a hammer for salvage. I carry mine in my cargo pocket with a homemade leather sheath for the blade. If I ever drop my tool (not that I've ever done that) I've always got this one as a mini-backup, and belive me I can breach an interior wall with it pretty quick.

    Now truckies can carry 3 tools, and even a hose dragger can carry two!

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    90 Truck, one thing you can do to all your ground ladders to save time is check the lanyards to see how they are wrapped around the rungs. We had guys who would wrap all the excess around 2 rungs 5 times and it would take to much time to unwrap it to put it up. Use several rungs, that way if someone is hanging out a window, when you undo the clove hitch, one pull and the lanyard should be ready to be pulled.

    Also, the point about starting the saw is gospel. We always maintain our saw brakes and if its really smokey, we set the brake and go up with it running.

    Finally always remember to cut your hole, open it up and shove your blunt end of your pike pole (or working end on NY hooks, being the other end is a pry end or water shut off on some) down through the hole to clear out the wallboard on the ceiling....oh yeah did I forget to tell you to advise the engine guys that shouldn't be under it that you were doing that?

    And remember, anyone can be an engine guy, but truckies are chosen!!
    Kinda like the military you have the Army (='s Engine guys) and then there is the United States Marine Corps (='s Truckies)

    Sorry gang, I may on an engine now because I'm a medic, but my heart will always remain a truckie, and my body will always be made for it!

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    Talking

    "Kinda like the military you have the Army (='s Engine guys) and then there is the United States Marine Corps (='s Truckies)"

    You mean that truckies can't even buy their own underwear without someone else buying them? Or do they have "Bought and Paid for by an Engine Co." tattooed somewhere on them like Marines have "Bought and Paid for by the US Navy" on them?
    Doc DC2
    ex-FDNY (E 74)

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    Lightbulb Ok, few more....

    ALSFirefighter- Thanks. Glad someone liked my
    info. I got a few more-

    1. When it comes to tools, rather youre the first
    to the scene or last, DO NOT go in empty handed.
    Atleast carry the irons (axe/halligan).

    2. In regards to cutting any hole in the roof-
    -Make sure your cuts OVER LAP! No perfect squares
    on the roof.
    -Cut it, then GET OFF! Dont stand around and blow
    each other. Get ready for another assignment.

    3. One of my favorites, if you need a foot hold
    while using the saw, chop that axe into the roof
    and leave it, handle at a 45 degree angle. Boom-
    your foot rest!

    Cali Boy slicing it out......BoukCA
    Last edited by CAFFBOU; 07-30-2002 at 11:31 PM.

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    - Carry several 8d or 10d nails on helmet, great disposable chock. Put between inner edge of door and jamb. Close door onto nail so its imbedded into door and wont fall out.

    - To get to top of a bulkhead to vent skylight, use baseball swing to drive pike end of Halligan into side of bulkhead (must be wood) to use as a step to reach top of bulkhead.

    - When cutting flat roof, try to cut to get 2 rooms and hall. Done by not cutting too close to edges.

    - To check for extension into cockloft from roof without a saw, use adz end of halligan (should be kept chisel sharp). Will make a small round hole even on a thick roof with a couple good swings. Remember this is just an INSPECTION hole, if fire comes out...you need a saw.

    - When searching without a line, get as close to fire as possible, search the room as good as you can, then close the door and search from there. This may require the use of a can and hook to reach in and pull the door closed. Make sure to let the Engine know where the fire is.

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    Talking c'mon!!

    i dunno, people, there's some pretty good stuff in here. sigh, a little disappointed with the turnout though, i think we could get some more stuff, don't you?!? C'MON, LEARN ME!! you ol' jakes aren't so crusty that ya can't type, are ya?!?!
    stay safe, all. peace!!!
    Matt G. Warminster Fire Dept. Station 90
    IAFF Local F-106

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    Thumbs down Ungratful little....

    90 Truck...what else do you want? You didnt even
    thank me for my 2 posts. If you want more info,
    start looking at anything from Los Angeles City
    Fire Department, CA. Here is their site-
    http://www.lafd.org Yeah, you
    might not care much for the Calif. stuff, but
    LA City and LA County www.lacofd.org
    know their stuff!

    And yes, they rock in truck OPS...Boukca.

    PS- You can find some good material at-
    www.firebooks.com
    Last edited by CAFFBOU; 07-31-2002 at 12:22 PM.

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    Thumbs up hey now...

    okay, thank you boukca, excelent info. and thank you everyone else as well. hey, i'll take it from cali, farmland, europe, any tips are good tips. thanx all!!!
    Matt G. Warminster Fire Dept. Station 90
    IAFF Local F-106

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    AT the risk of stirring up a hornets nest, if your looking for Truck Co. tricks and tips stick with the east coast & midwest companies. I know from first hand experience that FDNY, Chicago, DCFD & PGFD have their stuff together on this topic. Boston, San Fransisco, Gary, Dallas, Houston & Atlanta are very good as well. One tip though. Never take advice from a department that upon arrival of any significant fire: Hurries to the roof to open it up, breaks all the windows, stretches a street loop and then squirts water thru the windows. These departments are typically found in a region of the country that might fall of into the ocean after a major seismic event.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    this is hilarious....Lemme let you in on a little Secret Mr.Larry, the PGFD and Truckwork are far from each other. There are a few individual companies that do excellent truck work, but as a whole, the department is more of an interior attack, "go get it, we'll deal with ventilation after knockdown" type operation. I will agree that FDNY does play the Ladder Company game well, I have no knowledge of Chicago and DCFD has a Stick up at every fire, but never cuts a hole that I have seen. They may do it, but I've never seen it. I will say that here in PG we are famous for doing "the Trench Cut" on buildings. With the large number of Garden Style apartments we run, the Trench cut is a valuable tactic to control fire spread in an open cockloft. And as far as California goes, those guys are always cutting something open on a roof, I like the LA City style of Truckwork, I just wish I had more people on my own truck company that could deal with actually getting up the ladder and cutting some holes!!
    You Waste your time, YOUR LINE IS MINE!

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    To what CW said ...

    The first time I rode the tower w/ a certain PG company, I was starting the saws, making sure I knew who was on the outside team w/ me, and was told, "Eh man, it don't matter, everybody on the tower goes inside, you don't need to cut nothin'." And it's been that way ever since. The company kick's *****, though, so it's tough to argue w/ them.

    Stay Safe

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    CW7704, You may be correct in saying "some" PG Truck Co.'s, but the one I am thinking of does in fact open the roof and are good at it. WHo they are is not important, but they run a re-mounted baker aerialscope on a Seagrave chassis. As for Chicago, Truck Co. 07 put on a hell of a display on roof opening at a fire in a 4 flat I was at when riding with Squad Co. 01 a while back. As for DCFD, a year and a half ago I personnaly witnessed a very aggressive job of vertical ventilation by Truck Co. 04 at a row house. As for LA style truck work, your right. They get up, open it up and get the hell down. Very good job I agree. Now, if they could get the line pushed in it would be a great combination. And where at any point did I say California? Oh must have been the seismic activity comment. Ha Ha.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    How about a couple of chauffer-oriented tricks learned at PGFD to keep other companies from blocking the truck/tower:

    extend jacks even if you're not using them yet, so you have the room on the sides when you do.

    for rear-access ground ladders, take your longest one and lean it up against the rear to keep others far enough from your arse.

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