1. #1
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    frederick, md
    Posts
    2

    Default volunteer qualifications ??

    I recently left the staion i was volunteering at due to the lack of interest in training. This station was more worried about you working the funtions then getting trained. Now as far as riding qualifications it's a brief in-station overview of the apperatus.After that hop on and have fun.They pay little reguard to the laws that O.S.H.A. has put in place for our own safety.Let alone the standards our county hasout in place. They feel the laws don't effect them. The whole time i was there i tried to push the issue for training.And for that i was scorn. It is pretty sad that a fire station wouldn't want to push a training issue.I was always under the impression that was what we are there for to train to help our community. Now i do understand that our volunteer organization couldn't get by with out the fundraisers. But i would rather train to save a life,someones house, or be able to cut a pinned person from a car then train to flip hamburgers, and serve ham sandwiches. The deptartment is in a small town that is growing every day, and they don't have the trained personnel to get the trucks on the street. But to the lay-person they don't know who is trained and who isn't. But they will when something goes wrong. THAT is where the training comes into play.When they say why and what happened. Your training backround comes into play. You have the training to back-up your reasonings for what happened. I was just wondering if others believe this is how you would expect your personnel to think and believe. Or would you lead them down the you don't need that class to do that, Oh thanks for helping at the bingo last week will be there neext week? just a thought.

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    98

    Default

    I'm training officer in my department and we don't do as much training as we should. But it's also hard to get real enthusiastic about having a training drill when nobody shows up. Yes, I do think training is important. But so is fundraising. Without the money that comes from fundraising, we wouldn't have the money to keep equipment as updated as possible. The county government gives us enough to pay the bills, but not to make any capital purchases or improvments.

    IN MY OPINION, training has to be an integral part of the department's activities. Because, if you don't do the jobs for a while, you get "rusty". Better to make a mistake on the training ground and correct it, than with someone's life in the balance where there is no room for a mistake.

    Arthur
    Another lifetime volunteer proud to serve my community.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    478

    Default

    Without the fund raisers will the dept. have the equipment to train with? It cost money to train and sad to say equipment is very expensive. It's a two edged sword takes both equipment and training to do things right Study your books on your own and study the truck go over it until you know every knob and gauge good luck and don't give up

    Be safe the dragon still bites

  4. #4
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    frederick, md
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I will agree the dept. can't run like it wants to without the fundraisers. But as far as the training is concerned the county pays for the classes that we wish to take. I will agree with this being a double edged sword. But which is more important? To me they both are but if you don't have people trained then why have the fundraisers? And agian we had monthly drills but they to were a joke out of the 45 "responders" trained and untrained we maybe had 10 show up. but when it comes to a fundraiser they make it manitory for the people to be there. I know in todays day and age it is hard for someone volunteering to get the proper training right away due to people having to work more and wanting to spend time with their families. But the Maryland Fire and Rescue Instititute tries to make it easier for people to get these classes by offering them on nights and weekends and they allow for make-ups if you know you can't be there for a class.I mean to me it's crazy not to want to take some of these classes they are free and at you convience. just some more to think about.

  5. #5
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Kyle, Texas
    Posts
    18

    Default

    I too have to agree with everything that has been said. I only have to add that when I asked for training when I started I was told that it would be given soon. When I went on my first call I knew nothing and did not know what to do. Then I started to get into trouble because I did not know what I was doing. When I asked again I was told to stop using training as a copout and start asking questions and just watch other people. They said they never had as much trouble with anyone else as they do with me. Oh, one lesson I learned real fast was that when on the radio never announce to a ff that a member of his family is in the wreck that was called out. I would never had announced it if I new the proceedures, had been trained properly, and told not to listen to the wives of the ff. I was written up each time and then taken off runs. I wish there was a way to get the proper training for everyone.

    Keep safe,
    Jo Ann

  6. #6
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Bel Air, MD
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Hey Smokey:

    I am from a couple of counties east of you....

    What my company has done for a long time is make training a manditory requirement for membership. We drill EVERY Tuesday night and many Saturdays. To remain an active member one must make 14 drills a year - to be an officer one must make 17 drills for that year.

    Officers have additional requirements as do the driver/pump operators.

    I must say we have a very thorough program but a system like this takes a huge amount of manhours to operate. We have to have 2 separate drills (EMS & fire). Once a month the drills need to be combination type drills such as auto rescues, or other things fire & EMS run together.

    The only way to make training work in a volunteer system is to make it manditory. It always intrigues me when I hear a department does not train and retrain.

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Posts
    245

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    New members in the dept take a mandatory OSHA and Bloodborn Pathagen class before they respond to any alarms.

    Since we are a Fire and EMS agency probies must take either Basic Firefighter training (state class) or EMT class. This is to be done during the first six months of membership and completion of either of these is a must to get off probation.

    After a year of membership firefighters must take State sponsered Intermediate firefighter class. EMS members must take AVET during the first year.

    Apparatus operators must take EVOC training and pump ops for engines, ladder company ops for the truck.

    Each officer level must take additional training including but not limited to hazmat and officer leadership training (all state courses).

    Members must make a minimum of 30 responses a year to remain active. We have over 1200 a year. Yearly OSHA and bloodborne classes are mandatory to remain active. Failer to meet the yearly requirments result in a warning the first year for calls, suspension for not taking the OSHA/bloodborne. Second year in a row of either results in expultion from dept.

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