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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2000
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    Question Knee Replacement

    Requesting info on firefighting and knee replacemant. How does your department handle a ff that has had a knee replacements? Have you had a knee replacement and are still an active member of fd? How has it worked out? What problems have you encountered? Would you recommend it? Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber UTFFEMT's Avatar
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    Nov 1999
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    Park City, Utah
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    Default

    I had mine in 1985, the doctors told me to find a new career, well guess what, I am still here and on the front lines kicken A**s. I think it is all your dedication to keeping yourself fit. That is what I did, it took awhile, but I made it and I am sure you can to.

    I do still have some pretty good pain once in awhile, but I am working on strengthening my muscle around the weak areas to compensate for my weak spot.

    Front line since 1983 and still going strong

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2002
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    Daytona Beach
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    Cool

    I was struck by a car while on duty and received an injury to my left knee. Through all the MRIs and xrays, the doctors have found that I also have early onset arthritis in both knees.

    To make a long story short, I've had about twelve weeks of therapy and a cortizone injection. I'm still waiting on whether or not I'm having surgery. At any rate, I have remained on regular duty (in pain though) and the doctors haven't said anything about a new career. I think it is totally up to you to keep the mind set that you will keep your career. I know that whatever the outcome, I will have to keep working out and I'll have to lose a bunch of weight to keep the pressure off of mu knee, but, I also know that I am not willing to lose my career over this.

    If it helps you any, one of our guys lost his leg from the knee down in a motorcycle accident. You can do anything you really want to do.

    Stay safe and good luck.
    9/11/01 You will not be forgotten

  4. #4
    Forum Member ylwlab_45's Avatar
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    Jul 2002
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    Wauwatosa, Wisconsin
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    Here's my story: I am a career firefighter/paramedic who sustained not one, but two seperate duty injuries to my right knee in 2000. The last one required arthroscopic repair, and I was paid a lump-sum partial disability workers' comp. settlement as a result. I, too, was also concerned at the time about the future of my job. My doctor (a well-respected team physician for the Milwaukee Bucks) said if I didn't do the things necessary to help improve the overall health of my knee, I would be looking at a total knee replacement by age 50 (I'm 32 now).

    Here's what I was told: 1) Lose as much extra weight as possible to reduce stain on the joint 2) EXERCISE the knee! I try to do 30 minutes on the stationary bike daily. And this not at the pace of a leisurely ride through the park -- we're talking HARD, sustained, resisted effort. The stronger you can build up your quadraceps and the surrounding knee muscles, the better your knee will feel and function. I now have the legs of a speedskater, and have been pain-free and symptom-free ever since I started exercising my legs. The added benefit is that I'm more fit cardiovascular-wise, and I now feel I can function better now at my job than ever in my career. I really took a negative and made it into a positive

  5. #5
    Junior Member fireme1's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    The heart of the Northwest
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    Thumbs up Knees

    This doesn't speak to knee replacement but I hope it gives some insight. When I was in college, I blew out the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in my left knee. I mean comletely separated it from the bone. Not as serious as the Anterior, but still pretty bad. My doc, an Olympic Physician, ordered deep tissue massage and PT instead of cadaver replacement surgury. 12 years later, I am still going strong and have little to no pain when I work out. I know at some point I will have to get it replaced, but maybe not. My point as others have made is, strength and fitness go aling ways toward rapis and long-term recovery. Good Luck.
    Don't talk unless it improves the silence.

    Life without danger is a waste of oxygen.

  6. #6
    Junior Member fireme1's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    The heart of the Northwest
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    Default Oops

    Apparently my fingers exploded at the end of my post. I meant, strength and fitness goes along way toward long-term and rapid recovery.


    NEED MORE COFFEE!!!!
    Don't talk unless it improves the silence.

    Life without danger is a waste of oxygen.

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