1. #1
    41Truck
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    Default Salvage Companies?

    Two part question:
    1)
    I was just curious to see if YOUR DEPARTMENT operates a Salvage company or corps? What I mean for salvage (excluding removal of water) is that do you have a special operations unit composed of members that would board up the windows and roof and secure the building after a fire? Or is this handled by the housing authority or the responsibility of the property owner?

    2)
    Do you put any emphasis on training for salvage?

    The reason I bring this up is that Salvage and Overhaul was traditionally done by ladder companies but I've noticed that not too many departments do the salvage part of the operation anymore.

  2. #2
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    MIKEYLIKESIT's Avatar
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    We dont have a salvage unit and I might add that salvage has really taken a back seat in the fire service. Remember throwing tarps during drills? Whens the last time you did it? I think my department could do a much better job of protecting property. It all comes down to manpower.

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    We train for salvage. Unfortunately, most of our structure fires are toned out as "fully involved" or "large column of black smoke," so if we save an exposure or two or prevent a forest fire, we consider ourselves lucky. I think we have done a fairly good job on some of the smaller fires, especially chimney fires, which have a good potential for making a mess.

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    I once conducted a salvage drill for my department. It was during the winter months and it was a good indoor training topic. Several weeks later, we responded to a house fire and contained the damage to a hallway and a second floor bedroom. After the fire was knocked down, several firefighters grabbed the salvage covers and did an outstanding job of covering everything downstairs. They were so proud of their work, that they asked the dept. photographer to finish out the roll of fire scene photographs with pictures of their salvage work.

    Several weeks later, the insurance adjuster showed up at the station to get a copy of the fire report. He complimented our department on our quick knock-down, but said that he was disappointed in the amount of water damage that we caused to downstairs furnishings. Our chief reached in his desk drawer and pulled out the fire scene photos along with the extra pictures of our salvage efforts. The agent's jaw nearly hit the floor. Upon further investigation, it was discovered that the home owner removed our salvage covers as soon as we left and moved all of the furniture outside where it was exposed to the winter elements. The agent appologized and the homeowner didn't get his new furniture. We thought that he should have been charged with insurance fraud.

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    Our aerials carry the salvage equipment and it is used all the time. Not only for post fire clean up but also for flooding in peoples houses and businesses. Let's face it, these days there just aren't as many fires as there used to be so we need to justify having these rigs to the bean counters at city hall. We also use the aerials for needle pick-ups. Not the most glamorous task but someone has to do it. Some of the salvage equipment on board would be: tarps,hall runners(small tarps),mops and buckets,squeegies,sump pumps and hose,water vacuum,wood lathe and poly for closing up holes,hip waders,etc.

  6. #6
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    Our rescue/task unit/salvage truck carries tarps, tar paper, rolls of plastic, furring strips, nails, squeegees, etc. This truck responds on all calls. We don't have many structure fires, but we do salvage & property protection. More often, we're dealing with weather related damage, e.g. trees through roofs, etc.
    Proud to be honored with IACOJ membership. Blessed by TWO meals cooked by Cheffie - a true culinary goddess. Expressing my own views, not my organization's.

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    Default Salvage

    I am a member of the Rochester Protectives in Rochester New york. We are one of the last all voulenter salvage companies left in the country. We operate as a company with the Rochester Fire Dpeartment. We respond on all working fires and comercial water problems. We also respond whenever requested. We provide salvage, scene lighting, air bottles and whatever else we can. We are provided a heavy rescue style unit to respond in as well as a firehouse. Our members are required to give one 12 hour night a week and a total of 48 hours a month to the fire department. We were organized in 1858 by shop owners who were sick of loosing everything in fires. We are one year older than the Rochester Fire Dept. Over the years we have had over 100 Protectives go onto the ranks of the Rochester Fire Dept. In Spetember we stand to loose 5 more to the Fire Department. Salvage is our busines. Its what we do and we take it very seriously.
    ---TRUCK150---
    "WE STRIVE TO SAVE"

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    Over heew, it really depends on the size of the service as to whether you can afford to run a dedicated Salvage Unit. My service does not. On most biggish jobs, the OIC will delegate salvage duties to a crew, or the last engine to arrive. We don;t carry that much to deal with it now. As someone said earlier, it seems to have taken a back seat to other things, whereas once it was just about the most important thing to be done, after fighting the fire. Perhaps "new for old" insurance policies have something to do with this trend and more and more things being deemed "replaceable", than before.
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

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    Default The Underwriters Salvage Corps

    We had a salvage corps (organized in 1886) until around the 1960's, then the FD took it over. These were our squads until 1975 or 76. Now we truckers (truckies to you Eastern Seaboard folks) handle the job, and carry all the gear, salvage covers, mops, squeegees, brooms, watervac, etc. on the truck.


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  10. #10
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    Default Salvage Companies

    Our second in trucks usally handle the salvage problems, unless the first in truck is not on the roof. We carry a water-vac for water removal plus salage covers and rolls of plastic to protec the owners belongings that we can not remove out of the way. All of our companies are trained in salvage so an Engine company can do salvage if needed.
    just a dumb truckie

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