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  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Riverside County, CA

    (Calimesa-AP) -- The California Department of Forestry says
    crews are beginning to get the upper hand on a 300-acre wildfire
    that is threatening homes in Riverside County.
    The fire was reported shortly before 2 p-m. in the Cherry Oaks
    area, which is about 30 miles west of Palm Springs.
    Spokeswoman Michelle McClelland says the fire has damaged one
    garage but firefighters were able to save the home.
    McClelland says the brush fire is threatening about 100 homes
    but "the threat is dissipating as the hours go by." A voluntary
    evacuation was issued for 150 residents.
    More than 250 firefighters are battling the blaze, joined by
    helicopters, airplanes and bulldozers.
    The fire has burned mostly scrub oak but is threatening several
    cherry and apple farms and horse ranches.


    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com


  2. #2
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Update 02:30 EDT 8/12

    CALIMESA, Calif. (AP) - Firefighters battled a fast-moving brush
    fire Sunday that tore through 300 acres in Riverside County, forced
    150 residents to evacuate and threatened 100 homes.
    More than 250 firefighters fought the fire with helicopters,
    airplanes and bulldozers after it was reported at 1:45 p.m. in the
    Cherry Oaks section of Riverside County. The area is about 30 miles
    west of Palm Springs.
    The fire, fueled by dry scrub oak, threatened several cherry and
    apple farms as well as horse ranches near Cherry Valley, said
    Michelle McClelland, a spokeswoman with the California Department
    of Forestry.
    No homes were damaged, but one garage was reportedly burned.
    As nightfall approached the fire began to die down. McClelland
    said it was "somewhat controlled" but could not give a
    containment figure.
    "The threat is dissipating as the hours go by," she said. No
    injuries were reported and the cause of the fire was under
    investigation.
    The fire was one of several burning across the state as
    temperatures soared above 100 degrees in some areas.
    One blaze led to a severe accident when a fire engine hurrying
    to fight it plunged 60 feet down a freeway embankment, critically
    injuring three firefighters.
    The California Department of Forestry firefighters were driving
    on the Barstow Freeway en route to a 20-acre blaze in Lytle Creek,
    north of Fontana in Rialto. It was not immediately known what
    caused the crash, which occurred around 5:45 p.m.
    Meanwhile the 121,200-acre McNally fire crackling through
    Sequoia National Forest was 70 percent contained Sunday and had
    cost more than $28 million to fight.
    In Yosemite National Park to the north, several small fires were
    burning in the park's White Wolf area. The National Interagency
    Fire Center Web site said some of the blazes could be seen from the
    park's scenic Tioga Road.
    A wildfire that started two weeks ago in eastern San Diego
    County was 85 percent contained. Full containment of the Pines fire
    was expected Monday evening instead of Sunday as previously
    predicted, said Forestry Department spokeswoman Audrey Hagen.
    The Pines fire destroyed dozens of homes and burned nearly
    62,000 acres since it broke out July 29 near the town of Julian.
    The fire started about 60 miles northeast of San Diego when a
    National Guard helicopter looking for marijuana plants clipped a
    power line.
    More than 35 firefighters suffered minor injuries fighting the
    stubborn blaze that officials said had claimed 37 homes, 116
    outbuildings and 169 vehicles. It was 80 percent contained Aug. 5
    before it jumped a containment line and quickly spread.
    Close to 2,500 firefighters remained on the scene and the cost
    of fighting the blaze was estimated at more than $16 million.
    Mandatory and voluntary evacuations were ordered for parts of
    Pine Hills, North Peak and other areas, but some families were
    allowed to return to their homes over the weekend. Those who live
    in the northeast portion of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation near
    the Cleveland National Forest were still being kept away.
    Elsewhere in Riverside County, firefighters were trying to
    contain a 200-acre brush fire in Mias Canyon. The Pass fire broke
    out at 4:30 p.m. about five miles southeast of Calimesa.
    Firefighters on Saturday contained the 785-acre Pope fire in
    Napa County. Officials cited a man suspected of starting the blaze
    with a spark from his gasoline-powered lawn mower. No structures
    were damaged and fire officials planned to bill the man for the
    cost of the suppression effort.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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