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Thread: Amber LEDs

  1. #21
    IACOJ Agitator Adze39's Avatar
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    Many towns along hte CT/MA border have mutual aid agreements with each other. When you call for MA, you respond in a APPARATUS. These towns don't have problems with the lights on their cars because they don't respond to other towns in their POV.
    IACOJ Agitator
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  2. #22
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    Back to the original question, be careful about rear facing amber flashers. When I was in Law Enforcement in California, the CHP said the flashing amber light required on their vehicles drew in drunk drivers like moths. The largest cause of injury at that time was officers hit in their cars from behind by drunks who drove into the amber light. I would not put one on my vehicles!

  3. #23
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    SGR1600, check the definition of "emergency vehicle" in New York. You might find that it includes the POVs operated by fire chiefs. These vehicles are considered emergency vehicles in PA, and I know that fire chiefs are in NY as well.

    This is the legal definition of "emergency vehicle" in PA:


    "Emergency vehicle." A fire department vehicle, police vehicle, sheriff vehicle,ambulance, blood delivery vehicle, human organ delivery vehicle hazardous material response vehicle, armed forces emergency vehicle, one vehicle operated by a coroner or
    chief county medical examiner and one vehicle operated by a chief deputy coroner or deputy chief county medical examiner used for answering emergency calls, or any other vehicle designated by the State Police under section 6106 (relating to designation of
    emergency vehicles by Pennsylvania State Police), or a privately owned vehicle used in answering an emergency call when used by any of the following:

    (1) A police chief and assistant chief.

    (2) A fire chief, assistant chief and, when a fire company has three or more fire vehicles, a second or third assistant chief.

    (3) A fire police captain and fire police lieutenant.

    (4) An ambulance corps commander and assistant commander.

    (5) A river rescue commander and assistant commander.

    (6) A county emergency management coordinator.

    (7) A fire marshal.

    (8) A rescue service chief and assistant chief.


    Whether all of these are considered "emergency vehicles" in NY as well is one thing, but I know that fire chief's POVs are. That's why they are required to have an audible warning device (read: siren) in conjunction with their red light(s).

  4. #24
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    You are allowed to have both blue and amber lights on your car, however you may not operate both of them at the same time.

  5. #25
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    Originally posted by FirstInLastOut
    You are allowed to have both blue and amber lights on your car, however you may not operate both of them at the same time.
    And what state is this? Sure isn't CT.

  6. #26
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    This is true for NYS.
    You can run one blue light if your a vol. with an authorized blue light card from your Chief. You can run all the yellows you want. You just can't use them at the same time.
    Tom Bolanowski, Capt.
    NHFD

  7. #27
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    Yes, i am sorry i guess i left out that that was NYS.

  8. #28
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    Just another thought here, but every POV in NY has rear facing flashing lights. The common term for them is turn signals.

  9. #29
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    Default Help with a blue light

    Does anyone know if in NY you can run a blue light to the front of the vehicle while running amber to the rear of the vegicle. Any info on this would be helpful so I can pusrchase my interior stroe setup. One dual dashmiser remote strobe on front blue/blue and two remote whelen yellow strobe dashmiser singles on the bakc all for $300 including switches and a 6x90 power supply with 9 flash patterns. Any info on whelen tir6 blue LEd would be helpful. Thansk.

  10. #30
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    We have amber arrow boards mounted on the back of some of our apparatus. They are found on the pumps which have a high speed roadway in their district(70kmh or greater) and on the aerials which also respond to mva's on high speed roadways to assist with scene safety. This came about as a result of a lawsuit after a young girl was killed after driving into the back of a pump which was parked at an accident scene on the freeway.( All emergency lights were flashing)Now we use the apparatus with the arrow boards and bring traffic to a near standstill.

  11. #31
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    Question

    Speaking of lights on POV's check out this pole on POV lights and tell me what you think. Put you opinions down on the pole. We are trying to get a feel for everyones reaction.
    http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/sho...threadid=43496

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