Thread: Dumb Question

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    Default Dumb Question

    What the heck is a quint? I a FNG and see this reference, but no one on my small rural dept knows what it is. Please help learn me more gooder about this here fire jargon.

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    Quints are fire apparatus with the following five elements:

    Pump
    Tank
    Hose Bed (supply & attack)
    Aerial Device (ladder, platform, etc.)
    Ground Ladder Compliment (usually a scaled-back version of a full aerial's compliment)

    For example, a station in my part of the county has a full quint, setup as follows: 105' aerial ladder, 135' of ground ladders, 600' 5" hose & 4 attack lines, 1500 gpm pump and 300 gal tank. You'll also sometimes hear people referring to telesquirts and similar apparatus as quints, but they're really hybrid engines, as far as I'm concerned.


    In my station, we have a quad (no supply hose bed): 105' aerial ladder, 147' of ground ladders, 4 attack lines, 1500 gpm pump and 400 gal tank.

    Traditionalists will define a quad as:

    Pump
    Tank
    Hose Bed (supply & attack)
    Ground Ladder Compliment (usually a scaled-back version of a full aerial's compliment)

    And, they may be right, but you'll see the term used more liberally these days.

    Hope this helps.

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    Thanks Capt. Bob, now I at least know something!

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    Slueth, I is a coledge gradgeuate two
    Emergency One Quint:
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    Yup, they made me an ingineer,...ah, enginear,...aw, I get to drive the big red truck but I don't have to spell it!

    P.S., what's the best way to get white out off a computer screen??

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    mE WuV qUiNs sPecialLY WeD wUnS.
    Seriously though I like Quints becuase of thier advantages becuase you dont need a ladder compony for a car fire and you dont need a pumper for a ladder rescue and just cause the look really cool!

    Thier are some disadvantages to them, they are not the end all,be all soultion to staffing problems, but for some towns like mine they fill there niche nicely!

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    With our tallest building a two story, and our largest the school, I see why we don't need a quint. (Now, wanting is another thing.)

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    Nah,Heres Was A Real Quint.In A Really Nice Red With The Nice Gold!Nothing Beats It!





    And Sleuth,It Never A Bad Thing To Have A Quint.Because You Never Know Whast Going To Be Built Next.It's Best To Get It While The Money Is There Because Say A 100 Story Hotel Was Going To Be Built But Theres No Funding For The Truck That The Department Would Need.But There Was 6 Months Ago.It's Just Best To Have It Because You'll Never Know When You'll Need It.Say Your Engine Company(s) Are Busy And Yet Another Call Comes In.You Can Send The Truck In Because They Would Have The Same Training.It Just Never Hurts To Have It
    Shane
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    In the real world, where I live a 3 story house would be a real departure. We need more tanker capacity before we look for anything else. Welcome to rural America!

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    What City Do You Live In?
    Shane
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    City? What City? We don't need no stinking city! I don't even live in a town or village. I live in Apache County. We are close enough that I got to spend 2 nights at the Rodeo/Chedeski fire near Show Low.

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    Whoa,Got Any Pictures?Also,Know If Show Low Fire Dept. Uses Patches?Can You Get Me One?
    Shane
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    What About A Patch From Your Department?
    Shane
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    Patches are not a big deal around here, we tend more toward tee shirts. I don't remember Show Low haviong a patch, we do not have any. As you can guess, Show Low is under some PR pressure now because of the Rodeo fire.

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    With our tallest building a two story, and our largest the school, I see why we don't need a quint. (Now, wanting is another thing.)
    ...
    In the real world, where I live a 3 story house would be a real departure. We need more tanker capacity before we look for anything else. Welcome to rural America!

    That's probably the right order -- gotta establish water supply first.

    Aerials -- whether a full bore 100' aerial, or simply a 55' Tele-squrt, though are a great way to put lots of water on a big fire fast. They not affordable to every rural area, and some areas still don't need one. But there are many areas with small manufacturing and farming going on that there are great tactical uses for aerials in firefighting. Plus makes working on pitched roofs that much safer if it's nearby.

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    Could I Please Get A Free Shirt?If You Wanna Trade,I Don't Have anything To Trade But Patches Though.......
    Shane
    Do not fear to step into the unknown...for where there is risk, there is also reward.

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    Rascal...don't you get tired of capitalizing every word? Man, you must wear out some shift keys......

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    Well,yes im getting tried of doing that.i've been doing it for over 3 years now and btw,I'm still using the same keyboard......
    Shane
    Do not fear to step into the unknown...for where there is risk, there is also reward.

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    Originally posted by Sleuth
    In the real world, where I live a 3 story house would be a real departure. We need more tanker capacity before we look for anything else. Welcome to rural America!
    I'm with Dal on this...you need to worry about the water first. However, if you can afford it, an aerial apparatus can be very useful in the rual setting, too. Between our own jurisdiction and our automatic mutual aid arrangements, we run our aerials to everywhere from residential suburban areas to industrial & large commercial complexes, to rural farming areas. Some are nice, easily accessible hydranted areas with sidewalks and level parking lots, while some are very rural, with dirt-lane access and the closest water supply at a dry hydrant 2 or 3 miles away. Even for smaller buildings (residences, etc.), aerials can provide ready access for ventilation and rescue operations, or provide good, independently stable, seconday escape routes for firefighters working on the roof.

    I'm not saying that an aerial should be your highest priority (I wouldn't have any way to know that), nor am I saying that you would ever need a full sized 105' quint to get the job done. We provide our piece of the mutual aid puzzle with out 105' quad and our 55' telesquirt. They both have their uses and, in the areas we cover that sound like the one you're describing as your own, we use the telesquirt more often than the quad.

    Just something to think about down the road.

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    Capt. Bob, our areas are the same, if you take away the suburban, industrial, and commercial elements. Also, we have ranches, not farms. The difference is we let the cows stay out in the cold (it makes for better beef), and the ranches have no large buildings or quantities of toxic chemicals. If you come out for a visit, you may reclassify your rural - for some fires our nearest water supply is a hydrant - 20 miles away! Tankers (and CAFS) are our life blood.

    Rascal, I don't have a department tee shirt! They are ""on order"". We care more about getting the job done than how we look away from the scene. This is real volunteer work - the shirts are considered "bennies".
    Last edited by Sleuth; 08-19-2002 at 06:48 PM.

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    If you come out for a visit, you may reclassify your rural - for some fires our nearest water supply is a hydrant - 20 miles away!
    No, no, no, that ain't rural... that's whatcha call just 'scarce'.

    But I live in a rural farming town and tankers are most definitely the priority without town water (hydrants, duh). Out of the three departments in our town, we do have one ladder, and all fires get automatic m.a. to that dept.

    But we don't even have a tax district, hell, up until 15 years ago, our departments didn't even have a cut of the town budget! All fundraising done by the FD. There's no way we could afford a $750,000+ aerial unit, we're havin trouble coughin up a (measly) $450,000 for a new heavy rescue and 2000 gallon tanker.

    But, damnit, we're nasty at drafting!

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    MuddybrookGuy, you just gave me an idea! Does anybody out there have a way to draft & pump sand? We have lots of sand and dirt, maybe we could use it to fight fires? Waddya think? If the drought continues, that may be all we have! (At the local lake, the level is so low the trout are leaning to walk!)

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    Enough sand will work well on fires....once the building is covered entirely, the fire will be suffocated and go out.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Post To need or not to need!

    In my rural/bedroom community, we have a building boom. At least 12? new housing additions going in with who knows how many more planned. What every new housing plan is going to is the radical pitched roofs. I don't know what the standard pitch used to be on normal residential houses but it was pretty much the same and manageable. Now it's ridiculous, the roofs are much taller and pretty scary to try to work on. It's an issue I started pushing a couple of years ago, that we need to consider a quint for safer roof operations. A wet roof, any ice or light snow and you have the potential for a serious fall. We just purchased a new ALF pumper but we were seriously looking at a quint during the process. I think any rural department with a lot of new construction could easily justify the quint. Now to be able to afford it is another matter. Just one serious injury or death however, and the funding isn't such a issue afterall.


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