Thread: Northeast

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    Massachussets-(Peabody-AP) -- Peabody firefighters are getting some relief
    this morning with some much-needed rain to help put out a 50-acre
    brush fire.
    The stubborn brush fire has been burning for 12 days now, and
    still has not gone out completely.
    Peabody Deputy Fire Chief Richard Nelson says the rain will give
    the ground a good saturation but will not extinguish the fire.
    Nelson says it's burning up to 12 inches into the ground. And
    because of the rough terrain and the distance from their water
    source it is making it rough for firefighters.
    Fire officials say the flames are getting dangerously close to
    several condominiums.


    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
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    FORT DIX, N.J. (AP) - A brush fire that started on an artillery
    range last week has been contained but will likely keep burning
    until it is doused by heavy rains, a base spokesman said.
    The blaze so far has burned about 1,600 acres in a remote part
    of the Army Reserve post, but no homes are near the area and no
    injuries have been reported. Officials said training exercises at
    the base have not been affected by the fire.
    However, a ban on the use of tracing rounds or pyrotechnics
    during training remains in effect, according to David Moore, a base
    spokesman. He said those items can cause sparks or explosions that
    could ignite grass or underbrush, which is severely dry because of
    the ongoing drought.
    Moore said the cause of the fire remains under investigation.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press.
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    (Augusta-AP) -- The Maine Forest Service says lightning has
    sparked nearly two dozen forest fires in central and northern Maine
    in recent days.
    Most of the 22 fires were in remote areas of northern Penobscot,
    Piscataquis and Aroostook counties.
    The Forest Service has been using helicopters to contain many of
    the fires until crews can reach them.
    The fire danger remains very high throughout the state, and more
    fires are expected to start up in the coming days.
    The Forest Service is warning people against open burning of
    debris.
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    (New Durham-AP) -- More firefighters are headed to New Durham
    (New Hampshire) today to help put out a stubborn wildfire that has
    drained manpower in the area.
    The fire chief says about 19 acres are involved and firefighters
    are exhausted after being in the woods since the weekend. Monday,
    more than 200 firefighters from all over the state were on the
    scene. Yesterday, 88 were sent there and today, about 50 from the
    southwest corner of the state are expected.
    The fire has been contained since Monday, and crews have been
    digging out and wetting down hot spots.
    Firefighters also are continuing to put out hot spots from
    wildfires in Hebron and Shelburne.


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    LACONIA, N.H. (AP) - New Hampshire and the White Mountain
    National Forest have decided not to send any more firefighters out
    West to battle raging wildfires because the potential for fires in
    the state's tinder dry woods is so great.
    They worry the continued drought and lightning strikes like the
    ones that caused a 30-acre forest fire in New Durham and other
    fires in Hebron, Alton, North Conway, Sandwich and Rumney could
    lead to a much larger fire this fall if conditions do not improve.
    Robert Nelson, chief of New Hampshire's Forests and Lands
    Division in Concord, said the situation is grave.
    For the past four years, Nelson and many other forestry and
    emergency officials have been concerned that the so-called Perfect
    Storm of forest fires could break out along the New Hampshire and
    Maine border in September or October, as leaves fall and winds pick
    up.
    Thousands of acres of dry timber and brush could ignite in areas
    like the Ossipee Plains, where devastating fires occurred in 1947
    and 1952, Nelson said.
    "I don't want to sound like Chicken Little, but yes, the
    potential is certainly there," Nelson said, especially since the
    ice storm of 1998 left dry timber and brush throughout the Lakes
    Region, Seacoast and White Mountains.
    New England's history has shown that major forest fires tend to
    happen in 50-year cycles, he added. Without any appreciable
    rainfall in the forecast, the 50-year cycle could come into play
    this year, he said.
    Tom Brady, forest fire management officer for the White Mountain
    National Forest Headquarters in Laconia, said New England's biggest
    fires were driven by wind.
    The Brownfield, Maine, forest fire in 1947 came after a summer
    and fall with no substantial rain, Brady said. After a lightning
    strike, 2,000 acres of dry timber ignited quickly and high winds
    carried the flames from southwestern portions of York County to
    Kennebunkport and the sea, Brady said.
    The region was less populated than now and the fire cut an
    almost unbroken swath from New Hampshire to the Maine coast, he
    said.
    The New Hampshire portion of the plains consists of the towns of
    Effingham, Freedom, Madison, Ossipee and Tamworth.
    The 10-day fire killed 16 people, left thousands homeless,
    caused $30 million of property damage and scorched 35,000 acres.
    Last week, 250 firefighters from New Hampshire, Maine and
    Vermont battled a 30-acre blaze in New Durham. It was put out with
    the help of a National Guard helicopter that dropped more than
    50,000 gallons of water.
    Brady said 16 U.S. Forest Service firefighters had their hands
    full near Shelburne on Moriah Mountain with a 1.5 acre forest fire
    that was ignited by a lighting strike.
    They, too, used a National Guard helicopter to drop water before
    firefighters could move in, surround the area and mop it up.
    In Maine, lightning sparked nearly two dozen forest fires in
    central and northern portions of the state last week.
    The National Weather Service said a little more than a quarter
    of an inch fell in southern and coastal areas early Sunday, far
    less than what's needed to make up for the shortage of
    precipitation plaguing the state. The next chance of showers will
    be Wednesday or Thursday.
    Nelson said New Hampshire, Maine and federal agencies would
    react very quickly if a major fire hit the Ossipee plains again.
    The immediate response would include mobilizing as many local
    and state firefighters as both states could muster. In addition,
    National Guard helicopters with 300-gallon buckets of water and
    bulldozers from the state Transportation Department would open
    better access to the fire, Nelson said.
    Nelson said firefighters from other states and Canadian
    provinces also could respond.


    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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