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  1. #21
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Arrow

    LA VERNE, Calif. (AP) - Seventy homes in an upscale suburb
    abutting the San Gabriel Mountains stand abandoned as a 4,300-acre
    wildfire raged out of control in the rugged terrain of the Angeles
    National Forest.
    The fire had not destroyed any homes early Tuesday, but homes in
    northwestern La Verne, about 40 miles east of Los Angeles, were
    evacuated as flames moved southeasterly through the forest, fire
    officials said.
    "I've got butterflies," said San Dimas Canyon resident David
    Butterfield, who packed a few of his belongings but opted to stay
    at his house Monday while others evacuated. "They're taking this
    very seriously."
    The Red Cross set up temporary shelter at Bonita High School in
    La Verne and a pet shelter at the Inland Valley Humane Society in
    nearby Pomona.
    About 850 firefighters were on the lines of the Angeles National
    Forest fire, but it was only 12 percent contained by late Monday.
    One firefighter suffered a minor injury, authorities said.
    The fire was the larger of two dangerous blazes in California.
    The other raced over 160 acres in a Santa Clara County park west of
    Morgan Hill. Hundreds of firefighters attacked the flames on the
    ground while 10 planes and helicopters aided from the air. That
    fire threatened dozens of homes.
    Forest firefighters were protecting 77 cabins and Johnstone
    Peak, home to ham radio repeaters, cell phone towers and other
    transmission devices.
    The blaze, in the East Fork of San Gabriel Canyon, created a
    ceiling of brown smoke that draped Glendora, San Dimas, and other
    small suburbs on the foothills of the mountains. Flames were
    visible from the downtown Los Angeles skyline. The smoke and flames
    gave an orange tint to the moon as it rose over the San Gabriel
    Valley east of Los Angeles on Monday night.
    The cause of the fire was under investigation.
    Highway 39 into San Gabriel Canyon remained closed.
    The wildfire erupted Sunday evening near privately owned Camp
    Williams and Camp Follows. Winds fanned the fire and at one point
    it threatened homes and forced 300 residents and 2,000 campers to
    flee.
    The fire burned three miles southeast of an area scorched
    earlier this month by a 16,000-acre fire.
    The Santa Clara County fire burned in Uvas Canyon County Park, a
    lushly wooded park of more than 1,200 acres on the eastern side of
    the Santa Cruz Mountains, about 55 miles south of San Francisco.
    Heavy smoke from the fire was visible in Santa Cruz.
    About 400 firefighters were on the scene along with four
    helicopters, six air tankers and one air attack and the blaze was
    moving southeast, a California Department of Forestry spokeswoman
    said.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
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  2. #22
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Engine 101
    These flames are huge in height and there was fire tornadoe even
    I viewed video, fed to us from an ABC affiliate. It showed the fire tornado clearly. The headfire appeared to be VERY close to residential areas...with many, many homes!

    Be Safe!!!
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  3. #23
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    This is one of the nastier situations we've seen in some time. There are many residences very close to this fire - in fact it is bumping the breaks immediately behind (in the backyard) of many homes.

    We have just gotten the official word that the entire Angeles National Forest has been closed until further notice. I believe all the resources in the ANF have been pulled onto this incident. I believe there are something like 2,000 FFs on the lines and over a dozen helos and numerous fixed wing resources.

    The whole LA basin is completely filled with smoke and ash.

    Lots of additional resources are standing by on this one.

  4. #24
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    Well the air quailty rating for Southern California is unhealthfull today due to the amount of smoke that is blanketing the southland

    This morning State OES Engine's were deployed on Strike Team to this incident OES 228 assigned to Monrovia, OES 230 assginged to Arcadia, OES 281 assigned to Sierra Madre were sent

    Over in Claremont Ca fire officals are beginning to get ready to defend homes in those areas

    17 Helos and 9 Airplanes are battling this fire
    This fire is burning away from Monrovia
    This heatwave continues

  5. #25
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post San Gabriel Mtns.

    LA VERNE, Calif. (AP) - A wildfire in the foothills above Los
    Angeles jumped from 8,000 acres to 12,000 acres in just a few hours
    Tuesday, sending smoke pouring over the sprawling metropolitan area
    and triggering public health warnings.
    The fire, spread across 11 miles of the San Gabriel Mountains,
    has destroyed 44 cabins and homes and threatens hundreds of others.
    Flames raged unchecked as firefighters worked in rugged canyon
    terrain against erratic winds and triple-digit temperatures.
    "I can see flame right from my back yard. We got ash in the
    back yard, on the sidewalk and the pool," said Los Angeles Dodgers
    manager Jim Tracy, who lives in Claremont, 40 miles east of
    downtown. "It's not good. I've not seen anything like that."
    Some two dozen aircraft dropped water and fire retardant on the
    fire, which authorities said had the potential to grow to 20,000
    acres.
    Fear of new fires led officials to close the 650,000-acre
    Angeles National Forest, which includes the mountains, to
    recreation.
    "We certainly can't afford another fire," said Darren Drake, a
    fire spokesman. "This has got our hands full."
    Conditions were so hot and dry around the fire 40 miles
    northeast of Los Angeles that brittle chaparral and other brush
    virtually exploded in flames when hit by sparks.
    "It's whompin'," Drake said.
    The fire threatened upscale homes in La Verne, San Dimas and
    other suburbs.
    "It's very stressful. You work all your life and to see it
    threatened to this degree," said George Villegas, 37, an insurance
    salesman who took a day off work to keep watch on his $600,000
    home. His belongings were packed into his three cars and his wife
    and two sons were staying with relatives.
    Other residents described flames that towered 50 feet in the air
    and jumped between ridges.
    Voluntary evacuations were called for at least 500 homes and
    1,000 people. A mandatory evacuation was ordered for 77
    recreational cabins in San Dimas Canyon, and more than 200
    youngsters were taken out of two juvenile detention camps.
    Authorities were investigating the cause of the fire that began
    Sunday. Officials said it has spewed a roughly 2,000-foot-thick
    layer of smoke over portions of Los Angeles, Riverside and San
    Bernardino counties.
    An unusually strong inversion layer capped the smoke, and there
    was no wind to disperse it.
    "If I didn't know it was smoke, I'd think it was a low fog
    layer," Lu Rarogiewicz said as he looked over the San Gabriel
    Valley from 5,700-foot-high Mount Wilson. The mountain was briefly
    enveloped in smoke Tuesday, forcing astronomers to suspend solar
    observations with the telescopes that dot the peak.
    The South Coast Air Quality Management District, which monitors
    pollutant levels in the region, issued a special smoke advisory
    Tuesday, urging the public to avoid unnecessary outdoor activity in
    smoky areas.
    In Northern California, a 1,600-acre fire 50 miles south of San
    Francisco had burned two outbuildings and threatened at least 50
    rural homes. Wary residents spent Monday night atop ridges and
    huddled in pickup trucks.
    ----
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  6. #26
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Arrow Santa Cruz Mtns.

    MORGAN HILL, Calif. (AP) - Dry brush and hot weather helped
    spread a brush fire that had grown to 1,600 acres, destroyed two
    outbuildings and was threatening at least 50 rural homes Tuesday on
    the east side of the Santa Cruz Mountains.
    Several structures visibly were ablaze as dozens of residents
    voluntarily evacuated their homes Monday and Tuesday.
    And Tuesday morning, the thick smoke that could be seen for
    miles kept firefighting air tankers grounded, stripping the 1,000
    firefighters battling the blaze of a major weapon, said Pamela
    Rhoten, a spokeswoman with the California Department of Forestry.
    The air tankers returned to the skies in the afternoon.
    The fire started Monday around 2:15 p.m. and quickly crackled
    through tinder-dry oak, brush and grasses, home to mountain lions,
    bobcats, coyotes and gray foxes. The area, characterized by hot,
    dry summers has seen little moisture recently.
    The fire was 10 percent contained Tuesday but still spreading
    quickly.
    John Moore owns six acres along the summit and stood atop a
    nearby ridge with his dog, Dusty, and three cats Monday night
    watching flames and thick smoke blow up the hill toward his
    property.
    "Everything I own is up here," he said.
    April and James Williams also live near the summit and said they
    did not plan to sleep.
    "We're definitely going to be keeping an eye on it all night,"
    April Williams said, adding that her fear grew when the drone of
    air tankers ceased overhead around sundown.
    Smoke from the fire was visible as far away as Oakland to the
    north and Santa Cruz to the west.
    The fire burned near Sveadal, a resort owned by the Swedish
    American Patriotic League, and near rural Uvas Canyon County Park,
    about 50 miles south of San Francisco. The lushly wooded park,
    named for the once-abundant wild grapes that grew there, comprises
    more than 1,200 acres on the eastern side of the Santa Cruz
    Mountains.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
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  7. #27
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    State Office of Emergency Services as activated several OES Engine strike teams
    These are engine's given to local fire departments at no cost who agree to staff the rig and send anywhere in california when needed

    OES 228 is the assigned Engine to Monrovia and was dispatched along with OES 230 out of Arcadia and OES 281 out of Sierra Madre

    A Cousin of mine lives in La Verne, Her home is not threatned by this fire

    Verdugo which is the strike team cordinator for area c can provide 2 strike teams if needed, And if necesary at the approval of Glendale Fire Chief Chris Gray a 3rd Strike Team can be sent
    Well this afternoon
    Burbank Engine 12 Engine 14, Glendale Engine 25, Pasadena Engine's 34 and 36 and Glendale Battalion 2 formed into Strike Team 1202A and responded to this incident
    If anyone is intresting in hearing live audio feeds of this incident e-mail me and I can direct you to a several websites with audio
    Last edited by Engine101; 09-25-2002 at 01:44 AM.

  8. #28
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post More on Air Quality

    LOS ANGELES (AP) - Smoke roiling off a wildfire burning over
    thousands of acres in the Angeles National Forest filled much of
    the metropolitan region Tuesday, sending pollution levels soaring
    and triggering public health warnings.
    Weather and geography conspired to extend the effects of the
    Williams Fire beyond the suburban foothill cities directly
    endangered by the flames on the south face of the San Gabriel
    Mountains, one of the ranges that hem the Los Angeles Basin.
    An unusually strong inversion layer capped the smoke, confining
    it to a roughly 2,000-foot-thick layer over portions of Los
    Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, officials said.
    Lack of wind further kept smoke from dispersing, shrouding the
    region in gray.
    "If I didn't know it was smoke, I'd think it was a low fog
    layer," said weather observer Lu Rarogiewicz as he overlooked the
    San Gabriel Valley from atop 5,700-foot high Mount Wilson. The
    mountain was briefly enveloped in smoke earlier Tuesday, forcing
    astronomers there to suspend solar observations with the telescopes
    that dot the peak.
    The South Coast Air Quality Management District, which monitors
    pollutant levels in the region, issued a special smoke advisory
    Tuesday, urging the public to avoid unnecessary outdoor activity in
    areas where the smoke was present.
    The smoke contains high levels of fine particles that can lodge
    deep in the lungs, damaging them.
    The Los Angeles County Department of Health issued an "extreme
    caution advisory" for a wide area, chiefly valleys north and east
    of Los Angeles were smoke was trapped.
    The smoke also contains pollutants that had settled out of the
    atmosphere in the last rain-free months, only to be pumped back
    into the air when the soot-coated brush burned, said Joe Cassmassi,
    a senior meteorologist with the air quality agency. That adds to
    the stew of pollutants contained in the smoke, he added.
    "It's like a double-whammy in that regard," Cassmassi said.
    An onshore flow was expected to pick up later in the week and
    help disperse the smoke.
    ----
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  9. #29
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Forest Closed

    Angeles National Forest closed because of wildfire

    (Irwindale-AP) -- The entire Angeles National Forest was closed
    to the public at noon because of the danger of new fires.
    The U-S Forest Service made the announcement and said some day
    passes will be issued to people with special needs.
    The 650-thousand-acre forest is a major recreation area for the
    Los Angeles Basin and residents of desert cities on the north side
    of San Gabriel Mountains. It is also crossed by several highways
    including a heavily used commuter route between the desert and
    basin.
    An eight-thousand-acre wildfire has destroyed more than 40
    cabins.
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  10. #30
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post More info

    MOUNT BALDY VILLAGE, Calif. (AP) - A wildfire that has destroyed
    dozens of cabins and forced the closure of 650,000-acres in Angeles
    National Forest prompted mandatory evacuations as smoke spread
    across communities northeast of Los Angeles.
    The fire had scorched about 22,000 acres of the national forest
    by Wednesday morning, equal to about 11 square miles.
    The fire was the larger of two big blazes in California. The
    other raced over 1,600 acres in a park south of San Jose,
    destroying 15 structures and threatening 50 homes.
    The blaze northeast of Los Angeles more than doubled in size
    Tuesday. Some 2,000 firefighters were hampered by rugged terrain
    and temperatures that soared into the high 90s.
    A fine layer of ash fell on cars and yards in several San
    Gabriel Valley communities on the eastern edge of Los Angeles,
    prompting air quality authorities to issue a warning.
    Forty cabins and four federal research buildings were destroyed,
    and residents reported seeing 30-foot flames in some areas. The
    cost of battling the blaze has reached $1.5 million.
    The cause of the wildfire was under investigation, although
    officials ruled out barbecues or campfires as a possibility.
    On the northern edge of Claremont, residents of 40 homes in
    Palmer Canyon were ordered to leave because the fire was fast
    approaching.
    "I can see flame right from my back yard. We got ash in the
    back yard, on the sidewalk and the pool," said Los Angeles Dodgers
    manager Jim Tracy, who lives in Claremont, 40 miles east of
    downtown Los Angeles.
    The fire, which began Sunday evening near privately owned Camp
    Williams and Camp Fellows, had destroyed 40 of 77 cabins and four
    federal buildings in the San Dimas Canyon area. It burned just
    three miles southeast of an area scorched earlier this month by a
    16,000-acre fire.
    California's other major wildfire roared toward 250 threatened
    homes along the lushly forested Santa Cruz Mountains, destroying at
    least 15 structures. More than 1,000 firefighters were deployed.
    Dozens of residents voluntarily evacuated their homes and
    officials warned those lingering to pack their cars so they could
    leave at a moment's notice. Officials believe the blaze was sparked
    Monday by a fire within a mobile home along the eastern side of the
    mountains.
    The fire's thick smoke has hampered firefighting efforts. Air
    tankers were grounded for much of Tuesday until the smoke cleared a
    bit in the afternoon. The smoke was visible from downtown San Jose,
    20 miles to the north.
    ---
    On the Net:
    Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

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  11. #31
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    I can see the header from this new fire from the backyard oy my house, Pretty good header
    Eww... my dad's departments sent a strike team down there and they've got another team on stand by... looks like they'll be going by the end of the week.

    It's gonna be a dry winter too. The whole southwest is just a giant cinder box waiting to burst.

    I wish I could be down there kicking this thing too!
    "The Problem with ignorance is that it gains confidence as it goes along" - Gen. Powell

  12. #32
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    The Willams fire is in the verge of crossing into another county
    30,000 acres have burned
    2,668 Firefighters on scene
    4.1 Million to fight this fire
    Winds blowing from the west the fire has crossed the east fork and is burning in several areas that are unburned
    The fire has also begun to burn north towards where the curve fire burned
    5 Minor Injuries
    71 Strutures have burned
    Fire is also threatning homes in the baldy village area

    www.r5.fs.fed.us\angeles

    http://www.r5.fs.fed.us/angeles/inci...s/924_0600.jpg

  13. #33
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Wednesday Update

    CLAREMONT, Calif. (AP) - A fire raging in wilderness above Los
    Angeles' eastern foothills ballooned to 30,000 acres and threatened
    hundreds of homes Wednesday as it marched across the San Gabriel
    Mountains.
    The blaze was about two miles from Mount Baldy Village, a small
    community 4,000 feet up its namesake mountain, and several miles
    from 700 suburban foothill homes, Los Angeles County Fire Chief P.
    Michael Freeman said.
    The fire has incinerated 71 cabins and other buildings within
    Angeles National Forest since Sunday, but lack of strong wind was
    helping firefighters keep it out of the suburban sprawl abutting
    wildlands 30 to 45 miles east of Los Angeles.
    "I was nervous the first few days but it doesn't seem like it's
    going to come off the mountains," said Morgan Sokolow, 21, a
    college student who lives in a foothill home in Claremont.
    Containment was estimated at just 10 percent as flames moved
    both east and west along a 15-mile-long line. About 2,700
    firefighters worked the lines as 35 helicopters and airplanes
    attacked the flames from the air. Five minor injuries were
    reported.
    Highs were in the 90s Wednesday but cooler temperatures and
    higher humidity were expected in the next few days.
    Hot, dry Santa Anwinds often blow between September and
    February. In past years they have swept fire into neighborhoods. In
    late 1993, the winds fanned fires that destroyed 1,000 buildings in
    Malibu, Altadena and Laguna Beach.
    Hundreds of people were ordered to leave Mount Baldy Village
    Tuesday night, but about 50 chose to remain. The lodge, built in
    1914, stayed open to serve as a gathering place for residents, and
    plans to fight the blaze with fire hoses and water from its
    44,000-gallon swimming pool, owner Missy Ellingson said.
    "Most people sent their families down. The men are still
    here," Ellingson said. "They've been here for years and years and
    years. They're not trying to be heroes or anything but they don't
    want to leave their homes."
    Waiter Tom Staub noted some firefighters sipping coffee and
    said, "When they go, we'll go.
    "I'm nervous, absolutely. It's nerve-wracking. But I live
    here," Staub said.
    Fire inspectors said they had found the point of origin buried
    under rocks and debris that rolled off a burned-over hillside by a
    road. The cause was still under investigation, but officials ruled
    out barbecues or campfires as a possibility.
    The huge amount of smoke from the fire continued to reduce air
    quality in some parts of the Los Angeles metropolitan region to
    unhealthful levels. Two soccer matches at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps
    Colleges were postponed because of the pollution.
    The entire 650,000-acre Angeles National Forest was closed to
    recreation, although its mountain highways were open to commuter
    traffic.
    The fire was the larger of two serious wildland blazes in
    California. The other, a 2,529-acre fire in Santa Clara County west
    of Morgan Hill, was 25 percent contained after destroying 30
    structures, including at least 11 homes since Monday. Six people
    suffered minor injuries in that blaze.
    ---
    Associated Press Writer Eugene Tong contributed to this report.
    ---
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  14. #34
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    Post

    MORGAN HILL, Calif. (AP) - Firefighters raced to defend scores
    of homes as one of the area's largest wildfires in decades lurched
    toward remote neighborhoods nestled along the lushly forested Santa
    Cruz Mountains
    The 2,529-acre blaze sent towering walls of flame through
    tinder-dry brush and trees. At least 11 homes were confirmed
    destroyed and four were damaged according to Steve Gasaway, a
    California Department of Forestry spokesman.
    CDF had surveyed 30 percent of the area damaged by the 3-day-old
    fire. About 35 homes were checked by Wednesday evening, he said.
    There was no estimate on how many outbuildings had been affected.
    Six minor injuries were reported.
    Dozens of firefighters and helicopters worked to halt the
    advance of flames late Wednesday afternoon along the Santa
    Clara-Santa Cruz County line, midway between Corralitos and Morgan
    Hill. The intense flames shot 30 feet into the air and ashes snowed
    down on Summit Road, along the county border.
    Santa Clara County officials on Wednesday declared a state of
    emergency, which allowed them to bring in additional resources from
    outside and get disaster relief for residents, according to Pete
    Kutras, assistant county executive.
    "We know some homes have been lost and as the fire is moving, a
    great number of additional homes are being threatened," Kutras
    said.
    The fire line was within a half mile of Kim Son Meditation
    Center, a Buddhist temple on Mt. Madonna, close to Loma Prieta
    peak.
    On Monday, more than 150 people were at the center for a
    retreat, but by Wednesday, just a handful remained. They hoped to
    stay, but were staying in touch with authorities.
    "If it becomes dangerous, then we'll have to leave," a nervous
    Thich Quang Chieu said.
    California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection officials
    believe the fire was sparked Monday by a fire within a trailer home
    along the eastern side of the mountains.
    The rural area is known to law enforcement officials as a
    frequent dumping ground for the remains of methamphetamine labs.
    "You find a lot of dirt up there," said Santa Clara County
    sheriff's deputy Terrance Helm. "We find a lot of meth equipment.
    They just dump the stuff up there."
    A full investigation was delayed as more than 1,500 firefighters
    from around the state battled the flames, which caused propane
    tanks to explode as the fire closed in on homes. Residents in an
    area known as Redwood Retreat were ordered to evacuate their homes.
    Winds started picking up Wednesday afternoon, boosting fears
    among residents and fire officials that it would fan the wildfires.
    "It's so rugged. We're in a little valley and we're just
    surrounded by rough, rough terrain on all sides. It's just
    impossible to try to fight," said Julie Erikson-Bowman, who lives
    part-time in Sveadal, a resort owned by the Swedish American
    Patriotic League.
    Residents said there had not been such a big wildfire in their
    area since the 1920s, though a July 1985 arson fire in the Santa
    Cruz Mountains, near the Lexington Reservoir, burned 13,800 acres,
    destroyed 42 homes and forced the evacuation of 4,500 people.
    The fire remained 25 percent contained Wednesday, and CDF
    spokesman John Amos said full containment might be possible by
    Saturday. Firefighters were trying to block two active fronts that
    were creeping to the southeast and north.
    "It will be totally dependent on the success of operations here
    tonight," Gasaway said.
    Dozens of residents voluntarily evacuated their homes, and
    officials warned those lingering to pack their cars so they could
    leave at a moment's notice. Thick smoke was visible from downtown
    San Jose, 20 miles to the north. A Red Cross shelter was opened at
    a Morgan Hill high school.
    Melanie Albaugh sat at the intersection of Uvas and Croy roads
    with about two dozen neighbors Wednesday. She left her rental cabin
    in a hurry Monday afternoon.
    "I left a lot of possessions up there. We took the garbage out,
    but I thought we were going to be able to come back, so I left a
    lot of things up there," she said.
    The area, characterized by hot, dry summers, has seen little
    moisture recently. It is home to mountain lions, bobcats, coyotes
    and gray foxes, as well as horses kept by many of the residents.
    The fire, which Britten said has cost $1.5 million so far to
    fight, was burning near the 110-acre Sveadal resort and near rural
    Uvas Canyon County Park, about 50 miles south of San Francisco.
    The lushly wooded park, named for the once-abundant wild grapes
    that grew there, comprises more than 1,200 acres on the eastern
    side of the Santa Cruz Mountains.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
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  15. #35
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    Here is the latest
    The cost of fighting this fire is $6.6 Million
    31,500 acres charred and the fire is 25% contained

  16. #36
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Arrow 9/26 update

    Time to call the Kiwis for an assist!!

    MOUNT BALDY VILLAGE, California (AP) - Firefighters laid
    thousands of feet of fire hose and prepared strike teams to defend
    homes and businesses as a 32,000-acre (12,800-hectare) wildfire
    burned its way up the mountain.
    The most dangerous flank of the blaze above Los Angeles' eastern
    foothill suburbs on Thursday moved within 2 miles (3 kilometers) of
    this community more than 4,000 feet (1,200 meters) up Mount Baldy.
    "We are at the top of the chimney," said Capt. Jim Wilkins, a
    spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service in the village where
    firefighters were doubling 10,000 feet (3,000 meters) of fire hose
    already laid.
    Only about 80 of the village's 900 full-time residents remained.
    Air tankers rumbled overhead on sorties to bomb distant flames with
    retardant and water.
    The fire has burned 71 cabins and other buildings within Angeles
    National Forest since it began Sunday.
    Lack of wind slowed the fire's momentum and it was not projected
    to reach the village before Saturday, said Capt. Mark Reinhold, an
    Orange County Fire Authority spokesman.
    The village is a stopping point for skiers, hikers, families on
    outings and motorcycle touring groups. Its businesses and homes are
    arrayed along a two-lane road that ends at the base of a ski area.
    California's other major blaze, covering 3,142 acres (1,257
    hectares) in Santa Cruz County near Morgan Hill was 40 percent
    contained after destroying 11 homes and damaging four. It was
    burning toward remote neighborhoods along the forested Santa Cruz
    Mountains.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
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    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  17. #37
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    The cost of this fire continues to go up
    The cost of fighting this fire is now at $8.1 Million
    The cause is still undetermined at this time

    The road leading up to Baldy village is also very narrow

  18. #38
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    LOS ANGELES (AP) - If the beach is this city's front yard, then
    the Angeles National Forest, with its tall, rugged San Gabriel
    Mountains, serves as its sprawling backyard.
    Since its designation 110 years ago, it has become one of the
    most visited of the 155 national forests while standing as an
    alpine backdrop to crowded metropolitan Los Angeles.
    But a raging wildfire that has already incinerated more than
    31,000 acres of brush, has forced officials to close the forest for
    the first time in a generation.
    "The forest closure means I cannot walk more than 20 feet from
    my back door," said Nancy Steele, whose home in suburban Altadena
    abuts the forest. "That's our park. They've closed our park."
    The closure could last for months - even a year - to guard
    against more fires and to protect the foothill communities built up
    along its fringes.
    "We just simply cannot allow another ignition to create an
    inferno like we've had here that continues to threaten communities
    all along the Angeles area," said Ron Raley, the U.S. Forest
    Service incident commander.
    That's bad news to the hordes of people who use the 650,000-acre
    forest much like residents of New York City use Central Park.
    More than 20 million people live within an hour's drive of the
    forest; 10 million visit in a typical year. On holiday weekends, as
    many as 30,000 people have been known to crowd into the area now
    scorched by the so-called Williams Fire.
    "We have beaches, of course, but we have mountains, too. We
    have the best of both worlds," said Don Bremner, head of the
    Sierra Club's Pasadena chapter.
    Crowning the forest are the San Gabriel Mountains, with peaks
    that clear 10,000 feet.
    Naturalist John Muir once wrote that in the San Gabriels,
    "Mother Nature is most ruggedly, thornily savage. Not even in the
    Sierra have I ever made the acquaintance of mountains more rigidly
    inaccessible."
    But the steepness that lures hikers and climbers also makes
    fighting fires a difficult task and sparks fears that winter rains
    will cause devastating floods as water cascades down steep canyons
    stripped of vegetation.
    The forest divides the Los Angeles Basin from the Mojave Desert,
    and remains in parts a very wild place. Bears, mountain lions, deer
    and bighorn sheep all roam its slopes. But it's also an urban
    forest. On weekdays, its roads are traveled by harried commuters
    taking a shortcut from the desert to Los Angeles.
    On any given day, the forest also attracts leather-clad
    motorcycle racers, tenders of illegal marijuana plantations,
    practitioners of Santeria, poachers, thieves looking to dump stolen
    cars, astronomers en route to the observatories atop Mount Wilson,
    and hikers drawn by its many trails.
    "Virtually a small city appears, and with use like that,
    there's abuse," said Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Skip
    Pullee.
    When visitors are allowed to return, they will find a much
    different place, since the fire has blackened some of the forest's
    most heavily visited areas.
    "I dread thinking of going up there and seeing what's
    happened," the Sierra Club's Bremner said. "There are going to be
    thousands of people who are disappointed."
    ---
    On the Net: http://www.r5.fs.fed.us/angeles/

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  19. #39
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    35,000 acres 35% contained
    7 Injuries all minor
    44 homea and 28 outbuildings destroyed
    Current cost of fighting this fire $10.1 Million
    Strike Team 1204A has returned and been disbanded

  20. #40
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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