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  1. #41
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Sunday Evening Update

    MOUNT BALDY VILLAGE, California (AP) - A wildfire burning near
    this mountain hamlet was nearly surrounded, though high humidity
    and rain made it difficult for firefighters to ignite necessary
    backfires.
    "The weather is controlling the fire right now," said Jon
    Kohn, a Bureau of Land Management spokesman. The blaze was 80
    percent contained Sunday night; full containment was expected by
    Tuesday evening.
    The 36,200-acre (14,480-hectare) fire still was less than 2
    miles (3 kilometers) from Mount Baldy Village, but it was moving
    slowly and no flames were visible from town.
    The fire had burned 72 cabins and other buildings in the Angeles
    National Forest and forced hundreds of residents to evacuate.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
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  2. #42
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    Post Conditions

    LOS ANGELES (AP) - Drought-parched California, which has lost
    dozens of homes and nearly a half-million acres of wilderness so
    far this fire season, could soon emerge from the ashes.
    If recent cooler weather lingers, it could end the season next
    month. But hot, gusting Santa Ana winds are more likely to prolong
    it and increase danger - particularly in Southern California.
    "If history repeats itself, we still are facing the worst,"
    said Karen Terrill, a spokeswoman for the California Department of
    Forestry.
    "We're looking for at least another six weeks of fire season,"
    predicted Rick Ochoa, fire weather program coordinator for the
    National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho.
    Experts say Californians should get used to the idea that
    wildfires will be more frequent and dangerous in the future as
    suburbs push ever farther into the foothills.
    "There was a time 50 years ago when 100,000 acres could burn in
    California and not lose a house," Terrill said. "Now it's hard to
    see a 100-acre fire that doesn't threaten - if not take out - a
    couple of homes."
    The latest inferno, a 36,130-acre blaze that destroyed more than
    70 cabins and other buildings in the Angeles National Forest,
    continued to burn Sunday on the edge of suburban Los Angeles. The
    Williams Fire was 80 percent contained.
    The entire 650,000-acre forest northeast of Los Angeles, one of
    the most heavily used national parks in the country, has been
    closed indefinitely to avoid more fires.
    In Northern California, a 3,127-acre blaze roaring through rural
    neighborhoods along the Santa Cruz Mountains since Monday had
    destroyed 31 homes. The fire was fully contained by 8 p.m.
    Saturday, but would not be fully controlled for another two weeks,
    CDF spokesman Bob Davis said Sunday.
    Most wildfires are caused by humans, whether accidentally or on
    purpose, Terrill said. In the 1940s, the state averaged 2,000
    wildfires a year but over the past five years that number has
    reached nearly 7,000 annually.
    These days, wildland firefighters often run from house to house,
    warning people as they knock down fences and navigate narrow,
    winding roads.
    Linda DeSalvio's home in San Dimas was threatened by the
    Williams Fire until crews set backfires that raised 30-foot flames
    to stop the main fire from creeping down the hillside into
    backyards.
    The mother of three children said the fire hasn't changed her
    mind about living in the foothills, and she is confident that it's
    safe, thanks to skilled firefighters, tile roofs and big back yards
    to stop flames.
    "I think it's a wonderful place to live," she said. "It's
    very peaceful. We have the beautiful surroundings ... It's removed
    enough that you don't have all the congestion of being in town but
    it's close enough that you're accessible to everything."
    She has only one complaint: "They want to build homes above
    us."
    So far this year, there have been more than 480,000 acres of
    land lost in about 6,700 California wildfires, according to the
    interagency fire center.
    Earlier this year, the 62,000-acre Pines fire in San Diego
    County destroyed 37 homes. Another 121,200 acres burned in the
    Sequoia National Forest.
    A 20,857-acre fire that began Sept. 1 in the Angeles National
    Forest destroyed 73 structures, including 50 recreational cabins,
    and injured 14 firefighters.
    However, the number of fires on state and federal land has been
    about normal compared to past years.
    "The difference is that the fire conditions are a lot more
    extreme and dangerous," said Kim Zagaris, fire and rescue chief
    for the state Office of Emergency Services.
    A drought has left brush tinder-dry. Much of Southern California
    has seen a 150-year low for seasonal rainfall, according to the
    center.
    "You can go to a lumber yard and find wood that has more
    moisture than some of the timber and brush that you have in
    Southern California right now," Ochoa said.
    Along with the drought, a devastating outbreak of sudden oak
    death and a bark beetle infestation have turned tens of thousands
    of trees into dead wood.
    But this is not nearly the worst season on record, either in
    acreage or homes lost. There were nearly 3,000 homes destroyed in
    1991, most of them in the Oakland firestorm.
    A record 13,476 wildfires destroyed 873,000 acres of brush and
    timberland in 1987.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
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  3. #43
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    That little bit of rain we got helped crews on the Willams fire alot,They are expecting full containment by 10-10-02 by 6PM If the weather holds up maybe even sooner

  4. #44
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    Thumbs up

    That is GREAT news...let's hope they accomplish that, and also hope the weather prevents additional ignitions! Those Santa Ana winds are lurking.....
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  5. #45
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    Post

    MOUNT BALDY VILLAGE, Calif. (AP) - With a 9-day-old wildfire
    nearly under control, residents evacuated from this mountain
    village began returning home Monday evening.
    The Williams Canyon fire, which has scorched 36,530 acres and
    destroyed 76 houses, cabins and other buildings, was 90 percent
    contained Monday night, with full containment expected by 6 p.m.
    Tuesday.
    At one point the blaze extended some 15 miles through the
    Angeles National Forest, threatening several foothill communities
    30 to 45 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
    The evacuation order for Mount Baldy Village, a rustic mountain
    hamlet of 900 people, was lifted at 7 p.m., said U.S. Forest
    Service information manager Gary Chase.
    "We've had people tell us they loved us a lot today, and we're
    not used to that," Chase said.
    Firefighters said light rain, cooler temperatures and low winds
    in recent days helped them surround the blaze, which so far has
    cost $14.9 million to fight. Its cause remains under investigation.
    About 1,300 firefighters remained on the lines. At the peak of
    the fire last week, 3,500 firefighters worked to bring it under
    control.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press
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  6. #46
    Forum Member Engine101's Avatar
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    It was another overcast day here and it was a bit cold tonight
    Containment is now expected by tommarow evening

  7. #47
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    Default Final Update on the Willams fire

    100 % Contained
    Size: 37,240 acres
    Number of Incident Personnel: 598
    Cause undetermined

  8. #48
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    Default

    MOUNT BALDY VILLAGE, Calif. (AP) - The largest wildfire in
    Southern California this year, which charred more than 38,000 acres
    and destroyed 76 houses, cabins and other buildings, has been fully
    contained, officials said.
    The Williams fire was 100 percent contained Tuesday night as the
    number of firefighters had dwindled to 600 from a peak of 3,000,
    said Angeles National Forest spokeswoman Kathy Peterson.
    The blaze threatened several foothill communities 30 to 45 miles
    northeast of Los Angeles. About 800 residents of Mount Baldy
    Village who were evacuated last week were allowed to return to
    their homes Monday night.
    Lower temperatures, higher humidity and light rain helped
    firefighters gain control of the fire before it could come within a
    mile of the rustic hamlet.
    Fire officials estimate suppression costs at $15 million, an
    amount that will be shared by the federal government, state and Los
    Angeles and San Bernardino counties.
    The blaze began Sept. 22 and quickly spread to the Angeles
    National Forest. Rugged terrain and triple-digit temperatures
    worked against firefighters for more than a week. Officials also
    closed the entire 650,000-acre forest to guests.
    The cause of the fire remains under investigation.
    The Los Angeles County assessor's office said that owners of
    homes with damage of $10,000 or more might be eligible for some
    property tax relief. County Assessor Rick Auerbach said that most
    of the damaged homes appear to be on land leased from the federal
    government, so such relief would not apply.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  9. #49
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Unhappy Transient arrested-California

    Transient arrested for setting blaze ruled out in other fires
    smgpvsew1
    GLENDORA, Calif. (AP) - A transient arrested on suspicion of
    starting a 5-acre brush fire has been ruled out as a suspect in
    other fires he claimed he set, authorities said Sunday.
    Danny Mendez, 46, was booked for investigation of arson Saturday
    in connection with a fire in the south hills of Glendora, about 30
    miles east of Los Angeles, said Glendora Police Sgt. Al Wadham.
    Shortly after the fire was extinguished around 10:45 a.m.,
    Mendez emerged from the brush and admitted setting the blaze and
    others too, including last month's "Curve Fire" that scorched
    18,700 acres and destroyed 72 buildings in the Angeles National
    Forest outside Azusa, authorities said.
    But after questioning by investigators, Mendez, who was jailed
    in lieu of $50,000 bail, was ruled out as a suspect in the other
    recent fires.
    "We believe he is responsible for our fire yesterday," Wadham
    said. "We have not established any connection between Mr. Mendez
    and any fire other than our own."
    Ed Gililland, a spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service, said
    investigators do not believe Mendez set the Curve Fire.
    "Our law enforcement folks did question that man in Glendora
    and it appears there is no connection between him and our
    wildfires," Gililland said.
    Firefighters, aided by helicopters and ground crews, quickly
    extinguished the 5-acre brush fire in Glendora, Wadham said. No
    injuries or property damage was reported.
    Mendez is expected to be charged with arson Monday, Wadham said.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  10. #50
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Arrow EXTREME FIRE DANGER!

    SAN DIEGO (AP) - Facing the driest conditions in its recorded
    history, the Cleveland National Forest will shut down indefinitely
    Friday because of extreme fire danger.
    "Fires this summer have burned with such intensity that they
    are almost impossible to control," U.S. Forest Service supervisor
    Anne Fege said Wednesday. "We must do everything possible to
    prevent additional large fires in our forest."
    Recreational use will be restricted to developed areas where
    roads will give easy access during fire suppression. No campfires
    will be allowed in any part of the forest. Remote camping also is
    prohibited throughout the forest.
    "We want to remind people to smoke only inside enclosed
    vehicles, to be sure that all mechanical equipment has approved
    spark arresters and to be careful when doing back yard barbecues,"
    Fege said in a news release.
    Hunting will be allowed in the Agua Tibia Wilderness and Indian
    Flats.
    The closure doesn't apply to private land within the forest,
    which is north of the Mexican border and east of San Diego, or to
    camps operating within the closure area.
    Highways and roads will remain open for through traffic only.
    Cleveland is the third major Southern California forest to be
    closed in recent weeks because of fire danger.
    The San Bernardino National Forest was closed last week because
    of what officials called extreme fire conditions there. The vast
    majority of the 671,686-acre forest east of Los Angeles was
    expected to remain off-limits to the public for at least a month,
    although the public may still visit towns within the forest.
    The entire 650,000-acre Angeles National Forest just northeast
    of Los Angeles was closed last month after a fire broke out there,
    burning more than 38,000 acres and destroying more than 70
    buildings.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  11. #51
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    Default 2nd Alarm Brush fire - Monrovia

    Firefighters get break
    By Marshall Allen, Staff Writer


    MONROVIA

    A fire burned five acres in Monrovia Canyon Park Thursday morning, but it could have been much worse, Monrovia fire officials said.

    The two-alarm fire started about 1:30 a.m. and 130 firefighters from several departments responded.

    "Fires don't just develop in the middle of the night, especially with the moisture content we had in the area," Monrovia Fire Chief Sam DiGiovanna said. "It looks like someone set it."

    The weather favored the firefighters, but the fire fed on dry fuel and made a run on the steep terrain, DiGiovanna said. "Had this been a couple days ago, when temperatures were up, or during the Santa Ana winds, we'd be looking at a whole different ball game," DiGiovanna said.

    A controlled burn seven years ago, and the fact that the departments have regular training exercises in the park, were also factors in controlling the fire, DiGiovanna said.
    Last edited by Engine101; 10-11-2002 at 10:57 PM.

  12. #52
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    Default Red Flag Warning Issued

    NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE LOS ANGELES/OXNARD CA
    200 PM PDT MON NOV 18 2002


    ...RED FLAG WARNING FOR TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY DUE TO FOR STRONG
    GUSTY WINDS AND LOW HUMIDITIES ACROSS COASTAL...VALLEY AND MOUNTAIN
    AREAS OF LOS ANGELES AND VENTURA COUNTIES...ZONES 040...044...045
    ...046...047...088...053...AND 054.

    DISCUSSION: HIGH PRESSURE BUILDING OVER NEVADA WILL CAUSE WARM
    AND GUSTY NORTHEAST WINDS ACROSS VENTURA AND LOS ANGELES COUNTIES.
    WINDS WILL BE NORTHEASTERLY 25 TO 35 MPH WITH LOCALLY STRONGER GUSTS
    THROUGH PASSES AND CANYONS. HUMIDITIES WILL HOVER AROUND 10 TO 15
    PERCENT ESPECIALLY IN THE PASSES AND CANYONS


    This means Fire department's will most likely have increased staffing as well as increase patrol's in high fire area's

    The Angeles National Forest has been reopended thanks to a good amount of rain that drenched California two weeks back

  13. #53
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    Post Santa Ana...getting interesting

    Santa Ana winds increase fire danger

    (Riverside-AP) -- This week's warm temperatures and Santa Ana
    winds have prompted Southern California fire officials to beef up
    staffing and issue strong warnings about fire danger.
    California forestry spokesman Bill Peters says the rains earlier
    this month helped only for the short term, and now "we're
    basically back to where we started."
    Yesterday, C-D-F moved into a "special staffing pattern,"
    bringing in three strike teams from central California.
    A "Red Flag Warning" also was issued yesterday for both San
    Bernardino County and western Riverside County. Fire officials say
    that warning is based on wind, low humidity and low fuel moisture.
    Winds in the Inland Empire are forecast to be 25 to 35 miles an
    hour today, with gusts to 60 miles an hour below the passes and
    canyons.
    (The Press-Enterprise)
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    Post Southern California DRY

    YORBA LINDA, Calif. (AP) - Firefighters gained Thursday on a
    suspicious 476-acre blaze in brushy hills along the Orange-San
    Bernardino county line.
    The fire, which broke out Wednesday evening, was 80 percent
    contained, with no structures damaged or lost. One firefighter was
    treated overnight for heat exhaustion.
    Santa Ana winds that had gusted up to 35 mph at times began to
    fall off, helping 150 firefighters who were on the lines about 30
    miles east of Los Angeles, said Garry Layman, a spokesman with the
    Orange County Fire Authority.
    The fire burned a quarter-mile from the closest homes, Layman
    said. Several oil wells and houses under construction were also
    close but a firebreak protected them.
    The fire charred 408 acres of land in the Chino Hills State
    Park, which was closed to visitors, park Superintendent Ron Krueper
    said.
    The fire was considered "incendiary or suspicious" but
    investigators had not determined the specific cause, Layman said.
    The blaze was spotted at the end of Wednesday's record-setting
    heat in Southern California that had put fire agencies on alert.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  15. #55
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    Post Prescription for disaster

    LOS ANGELES (AP) - Fierce Santa Ana winds raked Southern
    California on Monday, toppling power lines, big-rigs and trees,
    stirring up huge dust clouds and raising fire danger across the
    region.
    More than 40,000 Southern California Edison customers were
    blacked out at times during the day, and some 8,400 were still
    without power by night, the utility said. Three-hundred personnel
    were working to restore service.
    The winds flowing out of the interior and offshore were
    unleashed by upper-level low pressure over southeast California in
    combination with a strong high-pressure building over the Great
    Basin, the National Weather Service said.
    Powerful gusts were expected to remain a problem through Tuesday
    night.
    "Red Flag" warnings were issued because of the strong drying
    effect that dramatically increased fire danger levels. Humidity
    levels plunged to the teens and single digits by afternoon, the NWS
    said.
    State forestry and fire officials ordered special staffing in
    the Riverside region east of Los Angeles.
    The winds pushed well out to sea and forecasters warned that the
    east-facing harbors and landings of the Channel Islands could be
    affected by a significant wind-driven swell.

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    Post

    Gusting winds spread fires in Sierra Nevada foothills

    (Sonora-AP) -- Wind-driven wildfires are taxing firefighting
    crews up and down the northern Sierra Nevada today - weeks after
    the end of northern California's official fire season.
    Problems in the Tahoe and Eldorado national forests and in
    Calaveras County all began when high winds spread fires set by
    Sierra Pacific Industries. The timber giant ignited the fires more
    than two weeks ago to burn large piles of logging debris.
    A thousand-acre fire is burning south of Highway 50, two miles
    south of Riverton.
    About 250 acres are burning mostly on Sierra Pacific land
    northeast of Nevada City.
    The largest of six Calaveras County fires is 30 acres near
    Highway 4 near Dorrington.
    No structures are reported threatened by any of the fires.

    (Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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    Post January Readiness

    CDF preparing for worst as winds head for San Diego County

    (San Diego-AP) -- The California Department of Forestry is
    putting resources in place in preparation for Santa Ana winds
    expected to begin in San Diego County tonight (Sunday).
    The C-D-F is bringing 15 people and five engines back on duty
    tonight. Two dozers and four handcrews are also getting ready in
    case things get out of hand.
    Fire danger is expected to be very to extremely high with the
    coming Santa Ana winds. Recent rains have helped dampen the ground,
    but the water hasn't made its way into the heavier brush.
    There's currently a ban on burning brush or incinerators in the
    county.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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    Post 2003 starts with a bang

    MALIBU, Calif. (AP) - A 1,200-acre wildfire stoked by fierce
    Santa Ana winds threatened hundreds of homes Monday in the hills
    overlooking the Pacific Ocean.
    An estimated 250 homes were at risk, said Los Angeles County
    Fire Department spokeswoman Maria Grycan. Two homes were damaged,
    along with a car.
    "Right now the wind is the most dangerous aspect of this,"
    Grycan said as flames danced around homes, some protected by green
    lawns, others by fire engines.
    The cause was under investigation, but it is believed a downed
    power line sparked the blaze, Inspector Mike Brown said.
    It broke out at midmorning in the Trancas Canyon area near the
    west end of 27-mile-long Malibu and quickly moved northwest at a
    speed of more than 3 miles per hour, said Los Angeles County Fire
    Capt. Brian Jordan. It was less than 10 percent contained by 7 p.m.
    as it continued to jump from ridge to ridge, burning its way up the
    coast.
    A mandatory evacuation was ordered for Encinal Canyon and a
    voluntary evacuation was urged for Decker Canyon, said sheriff's
    Lt. Phil Abner.
    About 100 people left their homes. They were directed to Malibu
    High School, where the Red Cross had set up a shelter, and
    evacuation points at two state beaches.
    About 600 firefighters were at the scene, some rushing from as
    far away as Orange, Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo
    counties.
    Tom Sprafke, 40, owner of one of the two Malibu homes damaged by
    the blaze, said after rushing home from work he began clearing
    brush surrounding his home with a chain saw.
    He thanked firefighters for defending his home, then noticed
    smoke poring through vents. Embers apparently flew in through a
    dryer exhaust vent and sparked a blaze that burned the second and
    third floors of the 3,200 square-foot house.
    "Material things can be replaced, that's part of living in
    Malibu," Sprafke said. "You have 365 beautiful days a year, this
    is just one bad one."
    Also burning Monday was a 150-acre fire in a rural area near
    Norco, 45 miles east of Los Angeles. An estimated five homes were
    damaged, said Joanne Evans, a Riverside County fire spokeswoman.
    Jane Adams, 60, walked with her daughter along Pacific Coast
    Highway on Monday night to retrieve her car from her Malibu home.
    Adams said she and previous owners of her Malibu house rebuilt it
    after fires in 1942, 1956 and in the 1970s.
    "Malibu people are stupid, they rebuild," said Adams, who has
    lived in Malibu for 27 years. "We do. We stick it out."
    Adams said she and her daughter were walking back to protect the
    house overnight from embers that could ignite a wooden deck.
    "I think we're lucky this time, now the brush will be all
    burned up. We'll have another 20 years," she said.
    Maren Scaccia, 33, said she rushed home as soon as she heard
    about the fire to check on her 90-year-old grandmother who was
    visiting from Chicago. She was relieved to find her grandmother
    safe and the house spared.
    "They do a good job, these firemen," Scaccia said.
    The dangerous Santa Anas typically blow between September and
    February. In October and November 1993, the winds fanned fires that
    charred thousands of acres, killed three and destroyed 1,000
    buildings in Malibu, Altadena and Laguna Beach.
    The blaze in the Trancas Canyon area was the third since the
    northeasterly winds hit Southern California late Sunday. A 5-acre
    blaze in Latigo Canyon and a 10-acre blaze in Corral Canyon, both
    to the east of Trancas, were contained early Monday.
    The two earlier fires caused no damage or injuries. The cause of
    those fires remained under investigation.
    The seasonal winds are formed by dry air rushing from the
    western interior toward the coast, gaining speed and warmth as they
    descend from the high desert. They are known as Santa Anas below
    the mountains and passes of Southern California.
    The National Weather Service warned they would last through
    Tuesday morning, with sustained speeds from 25 mph to 45 mph and
    gusts to 70 mph.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  19. #59
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post Red Flags Fly

    LOS ANGELES (AP) - Santa Ana winds returned to parts of Southern
    California on Wednesday, warming the region and raising fire
    danger.
    The temperature topped out at 80 degrees in downtown Los
    Angeles, 12 degrees above normal and just 4 degrees below the
    date's record. San Diego was 5 degrees above normal at 71.
    Several days of fierce Santa Anas 1Ĺ weeks ago extensively
    damaged power poles, causing blackouts that affected nearly 1
    million utility customers, and whipped brush fires among homes in
    Malibu and in Norco, damaging several.
    The winds were being produced by strong surface high pressure
    building over the Great Basin, the National Weather Service said.
    The offshore flow was expected to be moderate to strong.
    A so-called Red Flag warning was issued for the Santa Ana
    Mountains and foothills, and areas below passes and canyons in the
    Riverside-San Bernardino area.
    Winds reached speeds between 25 mph and 40 mph in the mountains
    of Los Angeles and Ventura counties Wednesday afternoon,
    accompanied by locally higher gusts.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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