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  1. #1
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    Default Quick question about cribbing...

    Anybody out there recommend coating cribbing with anything to prevent slipping?

    As far as I know, most departments around here don't coat their cribbing with anything. I suppose if you're using soft wood, then the weight of the vehicle should bite into the wood. Is it the same for hardwoods?

    Seems like I saw mention of someone mixing sand with paint to use on their step chocks a while back, and was curious what the rest of you guys are doing.
    Bryan Beall
    Silver City, Oklahoma USA


  2. #2
    Forum Member RyanEMVFD's Avatar
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    i wonder how a coating of rubber cement or something like that would work?

    the paint with sand should work if the grains are big enough.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

  3. #3
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    We use only uncoated cribbing for the slippage reason.

    I don't see why mixing paint with sand wouldn't work....

    Food for thought!
    Luke

  4. #4
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Why would you?If you paint them with anything it makes it harder to check chemical permeation and block degradation.Plus it creates something most of us have enough of,WORK!T.C.

  5. #5
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    Rescue 101:
    Why would you?
    I don't know, that's kinda why I was asking. I could see maybe coating the bottom of step chocks to give them a little more bite, but I wondered if coating 4x4s might mess with the stability of a box crib.

    Just something I was pondering at work today.
    Bryan Beall
    Silver City, Oklahoma USA

  6. #6
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Just something I was pondering at work today.
    Good to see you're hard at work, Silver!
    Luke

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber NB87JW's Avatar
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    We don't do anything to our cribbing other than paint out Co. ID on it and make sure it is pressure treated lumber before placing it in service. No reason to get carried away with any other wood treatment. Just take care of your wood.

    JW
    "Making Sense with Common Sense"
    Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
    ( MVRC@comcast.net) Jordan Sr.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber N2DFire's Avatar
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    Originally posted by JW@NB87
    Just take care of your wood.
    *Shakes head in disbelief that he's not going to comment after all*
    When you get an opportunity this easy - it just takes all the fun out of it.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

  9. #9
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Bryan,buddy,ya got waaay too much free time!They're your blocks,do what you like.If you really need something to ponder,let be know.I'll stoke the fire under my aggravating lil' Aussie buddy Luke and have him cough up another brainteaser.Something under two ton if you please Miestro,we're scaring 'em off with this big stuff.T.C.

  10. #10
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Already in the planning stage, Grandmaster 101!

    Good things come to those who wait...
    Luke

  11. #11
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    We are talking about pieces of wood, it is inexpensive and available, why are you guys spending so much time on your cribbing.
    First anything added to the wood changes its properties. Pressure treated wood, (used in decks)is just heavier then its untreated counterparts. The treated or "Wolmanized" wood does last longer then non treated lumber, but when wet this wood can become slipery. Not a desirable trait when holding up something weighing several thousand pounds.
    Southern Pine and Douglas Fir are two of the strongest "soft woods" which make them good choices for cribbing and shoring work. Cribbing should be strong enough to support the weight you need, but soft enough to crush a bit instead of having a catastrophic failure without warning. Aside from price that is why we don't use Oak for cribbing, because it doesn't give as much warning.
    A 2X2 crib made out of 4X4s have a capacity of approx. 24,000 lbs, while a 3X3 crib can carry 60,000 lbs. Keep cribbing members overlaped approx 4" to prevent splitting off of corners and failure. The overlap will allow for a slow crushing failure.
    Keep handles off of you cribbing also, it just gives you one more thing to get caught on and pull apart your cribbing.

    Cribbing should be discarded if you notice any crushing or other damage from an incident or drill. Again it is cheeper to replace then take a chance.

  12. #12
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    We paint our cribbing, and put sand in the paint, the paint makes it easier to clean oil and fluids off the cribbing, and the sand is used cause the painted cribbing would be slippery without it.

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