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  1. #41
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer urged the Ford
    Motor Co. Tuesday to retrofit Crown Victoria police cruisers with a
    fire suppression system Ford will offer as an option on 2005
    models.
    "It's great that Ford has come up with this new system for its
    2005 models, but what about the 350,000 police cars that are
    already on the road?" Schumer said.
    In announcing the new technology last week, Ford said police
    cars on the road now cannot be retrofitted because the system uses
    advanced electronics and onboard sensors that must be integrated
    into a new computer system.
    Schumer said Ford should be able to overcome those hurdles.
    "Although installing the new fire safety system in these
    vehicles may create logistical and structural challenges, I am
    confident that Ford's world-class engineers will be able to resolve
    such problems," the New York Democrat said in a letter to CEO
    William Clay Ford Jr.
    Police unions and others say the Crown Victoria model made for
    patrol duty, the Police Interceptor (CVPI), bursts into flames when
    hit from behind at high speeds. Schumer said at least 45 police
    officers have been killed or burned in fires following rear-end
    collisions with CVPIs.
    Ford said the great speeds involved in the accidents caused the
    fires and that no model can be fireproofed under those
    circumstances.
    However, Ford announced last Thursday that it will offer a fire
    suppression system on Police Interceptors starting with the 2005
    model. The system will release chemicals to douse fires in the
    vehicle's fuel system following a severe accident, giving officers
    time to get out of their vehicles.
    Schumer said Ford's announcement last week was an acknowledgment
    that safety weaknesses exist in the Police Interceptor.
    "You have shown that you will provide the highest safety
    standards possible in the 2005 cruiser and I strongly encourage you
    to do the same with all other CVPIs in use," Schumer told Ford.
    Ford spokeswoman Kristen Kinley said the company has developed
    the suppression system, the fuel tank shield and a trunk pack to
    prevent objects in the back of police cruisers like flares from
    being shot into the fuel tank during a rear-end accident.
    "We have already advanced the safety of the Crown Victoria
    Police Interceptor well beyond governmental regulations or industry
    practice," she said Tuesday. "However, until we as a society
    eliminate high-speed accidents, we will never eliminate the risk of
    fire."
    Schumer also called for protective bladders, similar to those
    used in some race cars, to be put into Police Interceptor fuel
    tanks to prevent punctures. Kinley said Ford has found the bladders
    do not hold up over the high miles and heavy duty driving
    experienced by Police Interceptors.
    About 1,100 CVPIs are in use by New York State Police. The
    models were fitted with a plastic shield that added protections to
    the fuel tank starting late last year. Trooper Robert Ambrose was
    killed last December when his CVPI, without the tank shield, was
    smashed into by a drunken driver on the New York State Thruway in
    Yonkers.
    Daniel De Federicis, president of the state trooper Police
    Benevolent Association, said hundreds of his members are driving
    what he termed "ticking time bombs."
    "It is insulting to troopers for Ford to announce grand plans
    that won't be implemented until two years from now," De Federicis
    said Tuesday. "These plans would be acceptable if they were
    coupled with immediate solutions that were implemented today and
    actually work."

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  2. #42
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Federal investigators clear Crown Victoria in Missouri trooper's
    death
    By JIM SUHR
    Associated Press Writer
    ST. LOUIS (AP) - The gas tank of a Missouri state highway
    patrolman's Ford Crown Victoria was not to blame when the cruiser
    burst into flames after being slammed from behind during a traffic
    stop, killing the officer, federal investigators have ruled.
    Gas tanks in Crown Victorias have been scrutinized following a
    number of fiery wrecks that killed law enforcers, but the National
    Highway Traffic Safety Administration said the gas tank of Trooper
    Michael Newton's vehicle was not compromised in the collision.
    "There wasn't any evidence of a safety-related defect," NHTSA
    spokesman Rae Tyson said Wednesday.
    Newton, 25, had pulled over a driver on Interstate 70 in western
    Missouri last May and was parked along the highway's eastbound
    shoulder when his car was hit from behind by a pickup truck and
    burst into flames.
    The crash wedged Newton's car door shut, trapping him, federal
    investigators said. The motorist he'd pulled over was rescued by
    two motorists from Newton's passenger seat; he was badly burned but
    survived.
    The NHTSA report said the fire began after something still
    unknown ignited gasoline that apparently spewed from the vehicle's
    filler tube, which was severed in the crash. The filler tube - the
    channel where gasoline is pumped into the gas tank during refueling
    - could have become disconnected in any type of vehicle struck from
    behind at that speed, the investigators concluded.
    "NHTSA is confirming what we've been trying to say all along -
    the Crown Victoria is just as safe if not safer than the comparable
    competitor," Ford spokeswoman Kristen Kinley said from the
    company's headquarters in Dearborn, Mich.
    Capt. Chris Ricks, a spokesman for the patrol, said NHTSA's
    findings mirrored those of a patrol-hired consultant - and that the
    patrol remains comfortable about the safety of Crown Victorias,
    accounting for nearly all of the agency's roughly 800-car fleet.
    "We're very aware of the crash that took Trooper Newton's life,
    but we feel safe with the vehicle we're using," Ricks said. "What
    we've lost focus of is that, had the driver of the truck been
    obeying the law and moved to the left (to give Newton's car
    clearance), this would have been a moot point. That's been glossed
    over."
    Last October, Daniel pleaded guilty in Lafayette County to
    misdemeanors including failure to yield to an emergency vehicle. He
    was sentenced in December to six months in jail and about $1,900 in
    fines, followed by two years of probation.
    Lawsuits filed by Newton's family and Nolte claimed the location
    of the Crown Victoria's fuel tank was partly to blame for the car
    igniting.
    A message left Wednesday with the Newton family's attorney was
    not immediately returned.
    In recent years, police and safety groups had questioned the
    safety of Crown Victoria gas tanks, given crash-related fires
    blamed in the deaths of at least a dozen officers nationwide since
    1983.
    In October 2002, NHTSA said a 10-month investigation found no
    defect in the cars, that the Crown Victoria exceeds federal
    standards for fuel system safety, and that the rate of fires was
    not much greater than with Chevrolet Caprice police cars.
    Still, Ford - in the wake of the government's investigation -
    agreed to retrofit the 350,000 Crown Victoria police cars
    nationwide with shields around the gas tank. Newton's car had such
    a shield.
    Ford also agreed to pay for the modifications and study ways to
    bolster safety in the cars, broadly used by police agencies across
    the country.
    ---
    On the Net:
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  3. #43
    expvol
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default NTHSA Sinks fuel tank dispute

    Read This

    Virtually any type of vehicle struck from behind at high speeds could have suffered damage similar to that sustained by Trooper Michael Newton's cruiser, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said.
    There wasn't any evidence of a safety-related defect," Rae Tyson, a NHTSA spokesman, said Wednesday.
    the channel where gasoline is pumped into the gas tank during refueling -- could have become disconnected in any type of vehicle struck from behind at that speed, the investigators concluded.
    Still, Ford -- in the wake of the government's investigation -- agreed to retrofit the 350,000 Crown Victoria police cars nationwide with shields around the gas tank. Newton's car had such a shield.
    But "from our standpoint, there's no safety defect with the Crown Victoria," Tyson said.

    Well if those shields are soo good, why did his car blow up?
    IT IS NOT WITH THE TANK. It is the positon that the car is put in, No other car is put into the position that a police car is. And it goes to show that the shields dont work.

    Stop wasting all the darn energy suing ford and put it into something productive, like getting fuel cells for the cars, face it nothing is going to protect your gas tank if it is hit from behind at 70mph!!! Only a fuel cell can help, look at the nascar cars, they have them. But they still have fires due to collisions at 130mph!!!
    So if you want to have a car after a rearending, get a fuel cell, I just did that verything, for my 1994 crown victoria that I am trying to get running, I bought a fuel cell and installed it.
    Enough of my ranting and raving.

  4. #44
    expvol
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Originaly quoted by NJFFSA16

    "It's great that Ford has come up with this new system for its
    Fuel Cells, that is the answer.

  5. #45
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Fuel cells or bladders may be the answer...but FORD isn't going to retrofit all the Crown Vics with them. If an owner wants to make the installation...Ford will not pay for such installation. You see...Ford doesn't agree there is any problem. And a department with hundreds of Crown Vics couldn't possibly afford to equip them all with fuel cells/bladders.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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  6. #46
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Well I happen to agree with Ford.The root of the problem isn't totally in the design but in the aftermath of severe shock loading.Fuel cell help?Yep but an even bigger help would be adressing the REAL problem.HIGHWAY MORONS.Officer killed/injured when hit by DUI driver.Lift said drivers license for FIVE years.If said driver is found driving after suspension lift their license for LIFE!We've got all these "tough" driving laws that are lightly/or not at all enforced.Way too much cerebral rectosis on the nations highways,new laws aren't needed,MORON reduction is.No one is held accountable for their actions anymore,that is a major player in the root sum of our nations problems INCLUDING but not limited to;DRIVING.As Gonzo says,nothing short of an Abrhams or APC will offer adequate protection against a hi-speed rear end assault.So lets attack the problem at it's root,ignorance/violence on the highway.Reward good safe driving habits with reduced insurance premiums and stuff it to the dummies with rates reflecting driving skill level.The more accidents/citations the higher insurance rates.T.C.

  7. #47
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post November 28th

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - A week after lawyers won the right to
    bring any Louisiana police department which owns a Crown Victoria
    Police Interceptor into a lawsuit claiming the model is
    unacceptably dangerous, State Police are considering whether to
    drop the suit.
    The Louisiana State Police fleet needs to replace 400 aging
    Interceptors, and Ford Motor Co. won't sell to agencies that are
    suing it.
    While the class-action status won last week greatly increases
    the scope of the case - and therefore the chance of a huge verdict
    or settlement - it could also block just about every law
    enforcement agency and municipality in Louisiana from buying the
    cars.
    Ford is trying to decide how to apply its no-sale rule in this
    greatly expanded case, attorney Mike Pulaski said. It may mean that
    Ford will stop selling the cars to any agency that doesn't opt out.
    Some State Police officials didn't want the attorney general to
    pursue the case in the first case. If the department drops out, it
    would be a major setback to the private lawyers representing the
    department.
    The lawsuit is among class actions in about a dozen states
    claiming that the model is prone to fatal fires in rear-end
    collisions, and citing deaths of 15 officers nationwide. Ford
    contends the deaths reflect officers' risky work rather than a
    design flaw, and has won the only case to go to trial so far.
    In spite of the lawsuits, about 80 percent of the specially
    packaged police cars sold nationwide are "Crown Vic"
    Interceptors. Chevrolet had the only major competitors: the Impala,
    still available, and the Caprice, which General Motors stopped
    making as a police model in 1996.
    Police officers like the Interceptor's big interior and trunk,
    which mean more room for prisoners and equipment, and its powerful
    engine and rear-wheel drive, which many drivers believe offers
    superior handling in emergencies.
    Somewhere between 250,000 and 450,000 Interceptors are on the
    nation's roads. Not even Ford knows the exact total. Lawyers in
    this case say there probably are 10,000 to 15,000 Interceptors in
    Louisiana.
    The suits contend that the layout of the Interceptor's gas tank
    and fuel system leads to leaks and explosions in rear-end
    collisions. Police cars are vulnerable to such crashes because they
    must park beside highways to help motorists and write tickets.
    At one point, 38 Louisiana police departments and sheriff's
    offices were suing Ford. Most, including the Orleans and Jefferson
    parish sheriff's offices, dropped the suits. Those agencies may be
    excluded from the state's class-action lawsuit, but the judge
    hasn't ruled.
    Ford has said the 10 current suits in Louisiana are more than in
    any other state. Besides State Police, St. Charles, St. John the
    Baptist, Lafourche, Terrebonne, Avoyelles and Iberville parishes,
    and the cities of Houma and Ball have suits in state court.
    Shreveport is suing in federal court.
    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration investigated
    the Interceptor two years ago. It and the Florida Highway Patrol,
    in a separate study, found that the car meets safety standards and
    is no more at risk of fiery deaths than the Caprice.
    Lawyers for the state say they know of only one rear-end
    collision in which an Interceptor burst into flames because of a
    fuel leak. That one is not part of any current suit: the family of
    Trooper Hung Le, who died from burns after the 1998 crash, settled
    out of court.
    The lawsuits allege that Ford should pay because the cars are
    not as safe as the buyers thought they were.
    "We feel we paid too much money when we bought the car because
    we didn't know about the defect," said Ben Beychok, one of the
    attorneys who filed the suit. "The defect was never disclosed,
    even though Ford knew about it years ago."
    Ford says the car has no defect. It has offered plastic shields
    for the gas tank.
    Former state Attorney General Richard Ieyoub filed Louisiana's
    lawsuit last year for State Police. It has continued under Charles
    Foti, who is in the odd position of supporting a suit as attorney
    general that he dropped as Orleans Parish criminal sheriff.
    The state is not paying anything but is allowing Beychok, Tony
    Clayton and Alan Usry to lead the case on behalf of the state.
    Trial lawyers typically get nothing if they lose but one-quarter to
    one-third of any awards or settlements they win.
    They asked to bring the state's case and local lawsuits against
    Ford under one umbrella. State District Judge Wilson Fields in
    Baton Rouge ruled Monday that the state is entitled to represent,
    as a class, all political subdivisions that have bought
    Interceptors since 1992.
    Pulaski said Ford will appeal, a process that could take up to a
    year.
    Col. Henry Whitehorn, who oversees State Police, is consulting
    with department attorneys and has not decided whether to stay in
    the suit, Lt. Lawrence McLeary said.
    Before the suit was filed last year, the captain in charge of
    the troopers' fleet said he was confident in the Interceptor and
    had advised state attorneys not to sue, according to a deposition.
    Former head of State Police Col. Terry Landry also shared that view
    when he was in charge last year, McLeary said.
    Trial attorney Clayton said troopers are not qualified to judge.
    "The troopers are not experts, and they don't know anything about
    the designs," he said.
    ---
    Information from: The Times-Picayune, http://
    WWW.TIMESPICAYUNE.COM

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  8. #48
    Forum Member RLFD14's Avatar
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    Can't buy CV's? Problem solved.



    http://www.njlawman.com/Feature%20Pi...e%20magnum.htm

    While I am not pleased that CV's are prone to fire when rear-ended, I think we all agree that these cars are exposed to practically immeasurable hazards. Cops have more than their share to deal with in the first place... people just need to slow the hell down.

  9. #49
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default CA...

    The thing I have to keep coming back to on this issue is
    the California Highway Patrol. (CHP) The CHP is the largest
    purchaser of Crown Vics in the nation and the largest law
    enforcement agency as well. Thus, the CHP has the most
    rear-end collisions and accidents in these vehicles. (weekly)

    BUT...None of them explode and there are no lawsuits thats
    I know of.

    WHY? The CHP modifies the gas tanks on new Crown Vics at
    their Sacramento facility.

    Hmmmmm...Does it really take a rocket scienctist to figure
    this one out? Just call the CHP and ask them what they do.
    I am sure they will share this information.

    Isnt a Police Officer's or Trooper's life worth a phone
    call or fax?
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 11-29-2004 at 12:28 AM.

  10. #50
    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
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    Default

    THere was another article in another Police magazine talking about the Magnums for Law enforcement and it compared the Magnum and the Crown Vic. I don't rememver a whole lot from the article, but I believe the Magnum has a longer wheelbase, but is shorter in overall length. I know they mentioned something about the acceleration vs. top speed, but I can't remember what exactly was said.......

  11. #51
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Hmmm...

    You know...Mini-Me should get under the Magnum and measure
    the wheelbase of the cars. Then I could start them up and
    *swish* Mini-Me.

    Sweeeet.
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 11-29-2004 at 12:52 AM.

  12. #52
    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hmmm...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    You know...Mini-Me should get under the Magnum and measure
    the wheelbase of the cars. Then I could start them up and
    *swish* Mini-Me.

    Sweeeet.
    CHP investigator:"You wanted to mash Mini Me with a Magnum?"

    Bou: "Yes, I did!"

    CHP investigator: "why"

    Bou: "He asked me if my Magnum had a Hemi... and I told him it would if he would lay down in the road and become part of the car!"
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  13. #53
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    Default Re: CA...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    BUT...None of them explode and there are no lawsuits thats I know of.

    WHY? The CHP modifies the gas tanks on new Crown Vics at their Sacramento facility.
    why should CHP have to modify the tanks on their own? if there is a problem with them, shouldn't ford correct the process at the factory? so instead of relying on each individual department to make the fix, have the company that builds the cars do it?
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

    FF/EMT/DBP

  14. #54
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re: CA...

    Originally posted by DrParasite


    why should CHP have to modify the tanks on their own? if there is a problem with them, shouldn't ford correct the process at the factory? so instead of relying on each individual department to make the fix, have the company that builds the cars do it?
    It is my understanding that the CHP modifies their Crown Vics
    to accompany their own radio/trunk modications, NOT in hopes
    to advoid a crash/explosion. The CHP just did this on its own
    for their own likings.

    There is NO link between the explosions and their own mods.
    They just did it on thier own for their radios and it
    turned out to be a win-win situation.

    Again, this is just how it was explained to me. I might be
    wrong.

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