1. #1
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    Question What extrication equipment should we buy next?

    At long last, our new rescue pumper is due for delivery in January. While it's not a 'heavy' rescue, we try to do our best. One side of the truck dedicated to the rescue 'things'. Now that we'll have some space (and some money) what should be purchase next?

    We presently have the following equipment:

    Hurst: 220V Simo Pump with two 100' hydraulic hose reels
    4 Cycle Pump with two 30' hoses mounted on a fastbasket
    ML-32 spreaders
    X-Tractor II cutters
    Rams (22", 36" and 60" (extended dimensions))
    Attachment Set
    3-way manifold with dump valve
    3 spare hoses

    Dewalt 24V cordless reciprocating saw
    Howell Quik-kut Air Chisel
    Glasmaster Windshield Saw
    2" X 2" X 18" and 4" X 4" X 18" cribbing qty~50 pcs. of rough sawn oak
    2 Plastic step chocks
    2 rocker panel reinforcing plates (for dash pushes)
    Toolbox with assorted hand tools
    Halligan bar, bolt cutters, sledgehammer, Hurst chains (not used much anymore) etc.
    ------------------------------------------------------------


    Some ideas that come to mind are vehicle stabilization struts, long cribbing, high lift jacks, convert our old 'O' cutters to a combi-tool. Of course, Hurst would love to sell you everything in their catalog.

    I know there are plenty of opinions out there, so let's hear them!!!

  2. #2
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    Default Suggestions On Equipment To Buy

    Stuart,
    Here's what I like to have handy:
    • Claw type metal cutting tool: Biel or similar. Works really well on roofs and windshields: $125-150.
    • High lift jacks: great for stabilization - about $40 each - get two.
    • Struts: you probably can make them yourself - handy for inverted vehicles.
    • Webbing: doesn't have to be rappelling quality - handy for tying off flapped roofs, etc.
    • Old sections of 5" hose - about 2-3' long - slide over cut A & B posts.
    • Low height hydraulic jacks - 12 or 20 ton - cheap extra lifting. You can also get the tall ones like they use on engine hoists - extra ram type tool.
    • Air bags: if you do lifting on soft ground.
    Hope this helps - let me know what you come up with.
    Proud to be honored with IACOJ membership. Blessed by TWO meals cooked by Cheffie - a true culinary goddess. Expressing my own views, not my organization's.

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    Stuart,

    Looks like Ohio-vol-ff and you both came up with a good list. I don't know what your budget is but it would be worth the money for some tension buttresses, and air (lifting) bags. Maybe 2 rocker panel blocks rolling dashes. If you have a generator on board that new unit then I would Either buy another Recip-saw (corded) or invest in a converter for your 24volt. We have the same saw and the main issue with that saw continues to be the darn batteries. Definatley get two more step chocks (we make our own from 2" x 8" board) A "piercing nozzle" would be great. (Because if you get an MVA "with fire" with patients trapped with a car this could save your butt from trying to open a damaged hood that troublesome, just pierce the hood and put out the fire, and open it afterwards).

    Good luck,fraternally JW
    "Making Sense with Common Sense"
    Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
    ( MVRC@comcast.net) Jordan Sr.

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up

    RES Q JACKS they work great cepco tool check it out on extrication.com

  5. #5
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    Drkblram,You know, I knew I liked you for a reason!All the cops think the only way you can tow a wreck is with a flatbed,taking no consideration that a flatbed WAS NEVER MADE FOR RECOVERY,only transportation.I do a lot of the type of work you just described,and out of 6 trucks guess how many flatbeds?Right,1.I like struts,the problem is where to find the room to put them.The rest of the list looke great,maybe a 10 amp + electric sawsall.T.C.

  6. #6
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    we carry a Tirfor 1.6 tonne winch on all our apparatus. Comes with a 40' cable and is hand operated. Not a sexy as an electric winch, but great for those times when you can't put the truck anywhere near the job. Does'nt take up much room and has been used many times to secure vehicles that are on the sides of embankments etc. We have two Viking continuous loop slings and stakes to use if we can't use the truck as an anchor.

    Also, lighting. Get plenty of portable lighting and a generator. A must for us as we mainly cover a rural area with no street lighting.
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

  7. #7
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    That's what they make selfloading dollies,4x4 lumber and ratchet straps for.Drag 'em even if they're in a ball.Sleezy when you know how.Post a pic if you can when yer wagon comes in.T.C.

  8. #8
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    We just purchased the Capabear Claw, neat idea.. have not had a chance to use yet.

    http://www.howellrescue.com/capabear_claw_hd_kit.htm

    http://www.emc4rescue.com/rescue/vehicle/capabear.htm

  9. #9
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    Stuart,

    Good idea's all. I'd add:

    >3/8" chains. We use 14' with grab hooks. Grade 70.

    >Chain snubbers

    >Hook cluster(s)to adapt from one type of pull system to another and to make purchase points. See pic below.

    >Cable come-alongs. Get 2 ton or better. Maasdam and Ingersol-Rand make the best.

    >10,000 Lb. ratchet straps. Cheap and extremely useful.

    >JackMates for your lift jacks. As soon as you get your jacks, throw the top clamps away. They're extremely dangerous! I don't make the JackMates anymore (I couldn't keep up with orders!), but they will be available in stores within about a month. Now made by Maasdam Pow'r-Pull.

    Of the additional stuff listed by others here that you don't have, I agree wholeheartedly with (in no particular order):
    Two more step chocks
    Lift Jacks (Maasdam or Hi-Lift)
    Extrication Struts (Ummm... you know my choice!)
    Hydraulic bottle jacks
    Air bags (big money here)
    Another Sawzall


    Hope this helps.

    Tim
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    www.rescue42.com

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    While I'm by no means any sort of guru on anything yet (still fairly new), I've heard negative comments about the use of cable come-alongs. Chain come-alongs are supposedly better, as the chain doesn't stretch like cable and won't snap back in the same fashion as a cable would in a catastrophic failure.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, and remember, this is just what I've heard.

    I just recently finished a Roadway Extrication class here in my state, and the college putting in on had some fantastic pseudo-halligan bars that were specifically tailored for obtaining purchase points in sheet metal. Not sure what they're actually called or who made them.

    Also had the pleasure of using a small ratcheting device used to cut the rims of steering wheels. Really quick and simple way to get the bottom of a steering wheel off of someone without using heavy hydraulics and with minimal fuss.

    Glassmasters are pretty useful too...

    YMMV-

    -Joel

  11. #11
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    Get some ratchet straps that have the chains at the
    ends, these are great. On the 5" hose cut some of them
    down the side they work great. I also recommend an
    air powered socket these are great too. Don't forget a
    plethura of hand tools you never know when your hydraulics
    will not be able to be used.

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    Saw the Cappa Bear Claws and Res-Q-Jack mentioned as well as my Friend at Rescue 42, there are plenty of strut type devices out there Do not forget RESCUE LOGIC and my Good Buddy ZMAG Ground pads! (all of these systems have advantages and disadvantages) Do your self a favor and Look around and try before you buy! TOOLS are important, but the OPERATOR is what really makes any tool successful or not, NEVER underestimate the power of keeping it Simple! If your Crew Likes the tools and can use them at Zero:dark Thirty with having to consult a manual then you have a winner!
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

  13. #13
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    A Posting from Forum Moderator Ron Moore

    This rescue/engine list of extrication tools is expanding very nicely. I see two areas that could use some further recommendations.

    One, let's get some more input on the "hand tools". Recommendations for those little things that a rescue/engine might carry in a tool box, bag, or pouch; side cutters for the battery cable, screwdriver for the trunk lock, vise grips, etc.

    Secondly, we haven't spent much time discussing patient protection stuff. The 5-inch hose was mentioned but there is more to patient protection than that. What patient protective equipment could or should a rescue/engine carry?
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  14. #14
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    Hand tools: 4-in-1 screwdriver, adjustable wrench, res-q--wrenches, hood tool, hacksaw, battery cable cutters, couple of linesman cutters, paint wand, Glasmaster

    We're going to be making some "hard" protection that will also double as airbag bases... basically wood squares with hand holds. I've seen some made out of poly (like water tank material). For soft cover, we use wool blankets, but are looking at other options such as a Basofil or Nomex blanket. The Pyroshield is one such product.

    http://www.howellrescue.com/pyroshield1.htm
    Here's another style:
    http://www.cribpac.com/blanket2.html

    For edge protection, short lengths of hose riveted shut on one end work for posts. Duct tape works too, and can be used for glass removal. Also kicking around are malleable edge protectors... basically thin pieces of aluminum wrapped in ballistic nylon, kinda cool imho. Almost like a SAM splint in nylon. Not cheap though.

    http://www.sover.net/~wysu/moguard.html

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