1. #1
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    Question Escape rope systems

    I was wondering if anybody out there has a good idea for a personal escape rope system. I have looked at and tried several but can't find one that I like.

    What about harnesses and escape belts. How many departments have built in harnesses like FDNY?

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    In 14 years of firefighting I have only had one occassion when I needed to ditch (in my particular case a 2nd floor). Since this was early in my career, and before escape systems my method was to have the pump operator cut water flow, I took 1 hitch around my torso (underneath arm pits) feeding the nozzle end up through the torso loop and out the window. The ride was graceful but was certainly effective in getting me out a room full of flame. Incidentially, the reason I had to bail was that my backup and the 2nd hoseline crew exited rapidly because of growing fire conditions (but failed to COMMUNICATE to me). Needless to say I was left with only one alternative... survival.

    I too have, over the years looked at rescue belts, bags, harnasses, etc. but have not come to a conclusion whereby that I wish to burden myself with an additional piece of extra equipment. With my turnout gear, scba, handtools, thermal camera (occassionally), etc.... just one more piece seems to be a bit too much. If I was forced to pick a system I would go with Yates Truckman from the firestore.com

    Hope this is of some help.

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    Why dont u go to your local hardware store and pick up 40 ft of rope and a carabiner. It doesnt take up much space, and u can use it to haul tools to upper floors, a search line, tieing things off, and the last but most important thing to slide your butt out a burning window all for the nice price of about 19.95

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    I wouldn't want the readers to confuse utility line (used to haul tools or hose and can be acquired at a hardware store for the price you mentioned) with rescue rope (used to save a human and will run you somewhere around $40+ plus the carabiner(s)). Furthermore once the lifesafety rope has been used for rescue, it is no longer useable except for utility or training grade work (not to mention that if handled using firefighting gloves that it also places it into that category).

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    what i did was went up to REI (a camping/outdoor store) and bought a 50 foot section of rope, two carbiners, and a regular figure 8. had a 12 foot section of 1 inch tubular webbing and boom my own rope rescue kit. i keep it in my bunker pants. i only got 50 feet because the tallest buildings we have are only 2 stories high. this cost about $50 when it was all said and done. there are kits out there with nomex bags with kevlar ropes. i might buy one when the funds become available.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    as to the orginal question about built in harnesses. i haven't seen that many depts that have those. most use the truckman's belt or have something on their scba harness.

    what ever you use train and practice repeatedly so it becomes second nature.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
    IACOJ Attack

    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

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    Yes, the difference between life safety rope and utility rope is an important one and the differences should be known, but having a sturdy piece of line is an alternative to the life safety belts if u dont want to spend the money or if you dont like their bulkeness. But in a worst case scenario its better to have something thatn nothing.

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    Thumbs up Good topic

    I carry 60 ft of 4300# rated life safety rope (8mm i think) in an old mask bag that I clip onto my SCBA harness. In my pocket I carry a looped tubular webbing and a locking carabiner that I can make a hasty harness with. I always have a tool with me, as on my belt I carry a 17" multihook, and it can make an effective anchor, should the need arise that I have to bail out.

    Simply clip the rope to the tool, make my harness, make a Munter hitch on the locking carabiner, stay low, and bail. Sound flimsy? It works. We trained and trained all morning on just this style a few weeks ago. Just as in proper rappelling with proper gear, need to slow down? Put your guide hand behind your back. No problem.

    Stay safe!
    Ken

    IACOJ

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    Default Rope bail out

    I disagree with having to pay high prices for this type of rope. I went to a local chain warehouse store and found utility rope rated to take a 600 pound work load. This is close to what NFPA requires for life safety, although I understand it should not be used for rescue, it is perfect for bailing out of a window to save your own butt. 200' cost about $14.
    I was able to make 4 ropes with a biner on each out of this one section of rope.

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    if you bail out a window on 600 lb work load rope it will break. when there is a fall on a rope there is a considerably amount of force placed on the rope. i myself don't plan on jumping out of a window but i would want something stronger then just 600 lb load rope. this is just my opinion.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    Gemtor harness attached to our bunker pants. 24' webbing in pants pocket. Nothing extra to carry. Great setup? Nope, but it works. Done at actual call? Nope, but just had 4th round of training on it this past week. It's a self survival tool, it's not rescue rope for lowering victims.

    we also teach the headfirst ladder slide. I know it's a controvisial techinque, but anything to get your backside out! I've also heard there is another techinque that spins you around as you come out, so you come down the ladder feet first but never tried it.
    Have done both many times in training. Headfirst is probably easier but depends on how far you are going. It's a bitch when helmet and pack are banging you in back of head. Spin style gets you down faster as you can put hands and feet on rail and slide, but spinning takes a little practice. Try them both, train on them both, use what you need when you need it.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Default rope bail and ladder bail

    Ryan

    The rope is rated at 600 pound work load but the static strength is much higher, tested at local industrial rope dealer and I was satisfied that it would work to rappel out a window.
    drkblram,
    Check with the University of Illinois Fire Service Institute in regards to the "flip-around" ladder bail. Remember that if you try any of the ladder bails to use a safety rope. There is also an article in Fire Engineering's web site that explains the 'flip-around" method step by step, I'll have to find the past issue and let you know how to find it.

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    Default Escapes

    drkblram,

    You're right!!! They spend all the time in the world teaching us how to get in and sometimes too far but, not enough time teaching us how to get out safe and FAST!

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    Default ROPE

    Afew of us that run the Rescue/Engine wear a class 3 harness like the fdny use,we have 30 feet of rope.We have 15 feet in each pocket run around are back so if we have to get out quick we don't have to worry about the rope and I'm righthanded so my carabener is in my right pocket.It makes it easier with it around your waist so if you can't see it, it's already around you.



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    Lightbulb Just another idea

    Hereís an alternative to using rope to bail out if you have a charged hose line with you. Shove the nozzle through the window and feed enough hose for it to reach the ground. Kink it, tie it or wrap it around something to stop it from feeding anymore hose. Wrap your arms and legs around the hose and slide it down like a fire pole. We have practiced this maneuver several times and itís very easy to do. Very easy to control your speed too.

    Just an idea.

  16. #16
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    I recently purchased a "Baldwinville" bailout kit from the Firestore. It was about 80 bucks for the rope, bag, and D Rings. I have used it in a drill and I am happy with it and it didn't cost a king's ransom for the setup.

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