Thread: FDNY pumpers

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    Default FDNY pumpers

    I saw on Seagrave's webpage that Milford,Ohio purchased a FDNY based pumper with a few added touches. It looked great. My question is this: While I love the looks of the FDNY style pumpers and would love to have Seagrave build my department a similar vehicle, is the price of such a vehicle cost effective in a community such as mine(population 40,000)or any other mid-sized town in America? A recent magazine stated that Ferrara was building a couple of new FDNY high pressure pumpers for $415,000. That may be a little high for a standard FDNY pumper, but probably not much, say in the $375,000 range. That is an expensive ride!!!

    Why is the cost so high? Everything on it must be custom. I would imagine that one could be had for at least around $300,000 by using a plan with more standard components while still getting the FDNY look. I especially like the low hosebeds.

    Fred Napp
    Haltom City, Tx. F/R

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    I would start with getting the specs of the engine you think you
    need for your area and work from there.
    As far as getting a unit to fit your needs its all in how you
    spec it out,big tank or small tank,1250 pump or larger,
    Any builder can build what you want,But its up to your Dept
    to decide if its a plain jane or top of the line unit.
    I won't be wronged,I won't be insulted,
    and I won't be laid a hand on.
    I don't do these things to other people
    and I require the same from them.

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    Lightbulb

    Bookwork, pleased don't buy an apparatus based on appearance alone. I do agree though, FDNY Engine Co. rigs have a certain look. As for the cost associated with them, well lets just say it all adds up. Each is not alot alone, but add the list up and its gets pricey. Aluminum wheel upgrade, custom configured pump panel, custom tank configuration to allow for the low hose bed, front intake, hydraulic ladder rack, any R & D and Engineering costs, etc. But overall look at a basic custom chassied Engine Co. rig built today. It is in the area of $250,000.00 to $300,000.00 anyway no matter who builds it. The high pressure Engine Co. rigs they just bought from FFA is a definite break from tradition, but they are gonna be more than a standard rig because of the pump model chosen, necessary body modifications, required discharge and intake changes, etc. I still can't believe they bought FFA and not Seagrave. I couldn't believe it when I read that a month ago.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    I agree!! I can't believe they went with FFA, no offense against FFA, but there must be some political wrangling going on. You are correct, apparatus should not be purchased on looks alone. I am very interested in the low hosebeds. We shall see how it turns out!!

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    I'm no expert but I would'nt doubt that FDNY would have a deal with Seagrave that they buy 10 and get one free?
    T*J*R

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    We have a new Pierce Dash with a very low hosebed. We simply worked with the manufacturer and told them it was a priority. They researched it, and found out they had built some for Milwaukee that had the floor of the hosebed right down to the chassis frame. You have to be willing to give up the large compartment on the tailboard, which we made up for with rescue height compartments on both sides. We carry 1000' of 4", an 800' 2.5 bundle load with 2 150' 1.5 leads, and a 400' 2.5 preconnect. There is also a backboard compartment and an A frame ladder mounted low. The top layer of hose can be reached by our shortest firefighter while standing on the ground. we could easily carry twice as much hose, but then it would be too high.

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    FYI

    The Milford Community Fire Department has been running Seagraves for almost 60 years (They do have 1 Mack). The "FDNY style" that you refer to happens to be the same as the "Milford" style. I've visited the department and can tell you that these rigs are unique in some of their features and configurations.

    STATION2 is absolutely right. You need to determine your needs and then determine who can meet your needs and your budget. Seagrave builds a great truck. That's one of the reasons why cities such as LA, NY, DC, and Cincy buy them. In smaller cities, these rigs will probably give you several decades of dependable service. Your department needs to decide what your priorities are and start from there.

    Good Luck

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    What exactly is a high pressure pumper. How does it differ to a normal fire pumper like we all typically use.

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    It is also called a high-rise pump. It is a 3 stage pump that does 500 GPM @ 700 PSI to overcome the elevation loss of a tall building.

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    What he said. It is different than the common single stage pump alot of pumpers have which is, for lack of a better word, a volume pump. Just some thoughts.

    Stay low and move it in.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    Man I learn somthing new every day.

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    I believe if your department purchased the same truck as FDNY, the price would be lower. I have heard the price of the FDNY units are inflated to cover the cost of doing business with FDNY. Such as there warranty requirements, (5-years bumper to bumper). They break it, the manufacturer fixes it at their expense. I also recall Seagrave having to employ a full-time mechanic at FDNY. It all adds up.

    However, you do not have to purchase the 3-stage pump to get high pressure. The City of Charlotte, NC has two high pressure rigs for downtown. They run 2-stage Waterous pumps with all Waterous valves, schedule 80 plumbing, 500HP Detroits and they are rated 600GPM @ 600PSI. As a matter of fact, I know Smeal is building one of the next four engines to replace Engine 4 with this high pressure rating.

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    That sounds about right when it comes to FDNY.

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    i live a few towns over from milford community fire dept. man they have about the nicest station in the world. you can visit there site by going to www.milfordcommunityfd.org. they have many pictures

    they just took dilivery of there new rig a little while ago and ive seen this think in person and man its nice.

    FYI people get confused on the fire depts, in milford. there is only one fire dept that serves the village of milford but there is 3 othere stations basically in milford but there miami township fire dept. just some facts there
    here is a picture of there rig
    Ryan

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    That thing is awsome

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    Default Furoofra

    A little more info on the FFA Engines for NY. I was unaware that N.Y. was actually going to purchase something from FFA. The people of La. raised over 1 Million dollars to buy ONE engine for N.Y. Well, for Some reason after the money was raised it was told that they now had enough for 2 engines. I can tell you that there was some politics involved. To this day I still cant figure out how the engine, which isnt really fancy, cost almost $500,000 especially when FFA employees supposably donated their time to build the engines. I also know for a fact that two months after one engine was delivered to N.Y. it still hadnt run a call because it had several problems with it. Some Gift. By the way, there was even enough money to pay FFA to build two other service type vehicles for N.Y. You can draw your own opinions.

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