1. #1
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    Default Help with TV Show "Fear Fighters"

    A Posting from Forum Moderator Ron Moore

    I have been contacted by a researcher for the documentary TV series "Fear Fighters", to be broadcast on Discovery Canada. I'm turning to my University of Extrication online friends to help with this interesting request.

    The series "Fear Fighters" spotlights advances in emergency rescue technology, along with the people who use these technologies. Topics of previous shows have included fire rescue equipment, ambulances, forest-fighting planes and Urban Search & Rescue teams.

    The researcher is requesting our collective opinions on a future episode; Vehicle Extrication.

    Here's what I need your opinion on:
    1) What are the latest advances in vehicle extrication technology?

    2) Are there any Fire Depts. or EMS services with a reputation for excellence in this field?

    For question #1, I thought of
    reciprocating saws, tensioned buttress stabilization systems, and the TERC-sponsored extrication competitions as being major new technologies. What other advances should we promote about ourselves?

    For question #2, what departments that are well-known for extrication would we want a TV show to highlight that would make us all proud? Can be a US or a Canadian agency; doesn't matter.

    Ron Moore
    <Rmoore@firehouse.com>
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  2. #2
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    How about the airbag systems, both HP and LP? Also, though not new, I feel going from the 5000psi systems to 10,000psi is an improvement- lighter equipment, more menueverable, less firefighter fatigue. Maybe a bit on cordless extrication equipment?
    Just some thoughts...
    Last edited by SPFDRum; 10-30-2002 at 11:20 PM.
    My posts reflect my views and opinions, not the organization I work for or my IAFF local. Some of which they may not agree. I.A.C.O.J. member
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    Question

    This doesn't really pertain to either one of your questions,
    but it might be something to include in the show,If it hasn't
    already been covered.

    How about the new risks we face from undeployed air bag restraint
    systems. And from the new hybrid vehicles, with the high voltage
    storage batteries.

    Work Hard
    Stay Safe

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    For us the Duo pump is the big improvement. When I think of all the setups we used that had "spaghetti" everywhere, manifolds, connections, dump valves and lockups our present system with two trolley mounted duo pumps with all tools pre connected are a very big plus. I agree with the 10000 psi tools being lighter and faster than the 5000 psi tools but I also know you will buy a fight between supporters of one over the other. Don't know anyone who doesn't like the flexibility that duo pumps have given them though. Wonder what the next ten years will bring!

  5. #5
    Sta22BeaverCoPA
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    1. The SCRT Tools, battery powered. The training that is now provided by Nationally known instructors and the local level instructors that improves the vehicle rescue in all areas. How patient care starts before the ambulance arrives.

    2. I'd put my fire department on the line, along with the nationally known rescue squads. The fire departments who perform vehicle rescue should be featured who aren't always in the limelight.

    But this is my opinion.

  6. #6
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    To answer the questions

    #1) I am not sure that there has been significant technological advances in the vehicle rescue tool field. In my opinion the tools are essentially the same as the first time we saw Johnny and Roy pull their Hurst set off their squad, with the exception of lighter materials and higher pressures. Several people here have said that their FDs still use the Hurst 32A spreaders, my FD is included in that group.
    I think the technological advances that were made were in vehicle technology in the areas of restraint systems, airbags, and alternative fueled vehicles. And, we have adapted to and overcome those advances using the tools that are available to us.

    #2) At one time in the not to distant past I would have been more than willing to put my FD on the list of groups with a reputation for excellence in the field of auto extrication. But, now, (unfortunately or fortunately) the amount of "tool time" is drastically reduced due to the changes in vehicle construction. We still run a fair number of MVAs but many of the patients are sign offs or walking woundeds.
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

  7. #7
    dazed and confused
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    Originally posted by Lewiston2Capt
    I am not sure that there has been significant technological advances in the vehicle rescue tool field.
    I agree.

    I was going to say something to this effect last night, but was too lazy. There have been some new tools introduced, but I'd stop short of calling them significant technological advances. Tensioned buttress stabilization is a pretty elementary and simple concept, with simple equipment that has been around for a while. 'Cip saws? Even if they're battery powered, I think it's a stretch to say they're advances in rescue technology.

    I agree that the advances come more in the form of protective devices and services found in the vehicles themselves.

  8. #8
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    i think the best advancement is training. now a days it's easier to go out and cut up some cars for training then in the past. the internet has made training easier as well. no longer are we relying on departments near us to learn techniques. now i can get those from fire departments all across the world. i can email vehicle manufacturers and get detailed information regarding construction of new cars then calling them on the phone or sending a letter via the post office.

    second advancement has the been public awareness of wearing safety belts. we can thank the local law enforcement for this one. simply put "click it or ticket".

    as for the best or most knowlegable fire department i can't think of anyone that just sticks out above the rest.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    Thumbs up

    1.) The advances in technology... Keeping up with the new places they put air bags, belt tensioners, new glass, building material, battery placement. The average person does not know who much you should know before you pull the equipment off the truck. They will want to see powerful tools at work. Many have been mentioned.

    2.) Discovery Canada,.. Pick a Canadian Dept.

    I like to think we are all professionals. except at spelling.

    Let us know when it will be aired!!

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    One of the new technologies that I saw at the FireHouse show in Baltimore was a Palm Pilot based information system on SRS Air-bags, and pretensioners! this is an updateable system that can be easily referenced accessed. http://www.airbagdata.com:8080/abd/airbagdataHome.jsp

    AsI was watching Motorweek (PBS' automotive TV magazine) and as they reviewed the new technolgies that Mercedes-Benz has on the road NOW We need to stay abreast of the changes and challenges that are coming at us in ever hastening up pace! So there is my vote for new technologies.

    As for Fire Departments, My vote would have to go to Burlington, Ontario or West Carlton, Ontario! Good Luck with the program and lets hope the show makes it way to the good ole USA!
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

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    Did I Mention Niagra Falls Ontario or Missisaggua(SP?) Ontario Has an abundance of Excellent Vehicle Rescue teams!
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

  12. #12
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    I don't know about the Recip Saw, Ron.

    Definitely not what I'd call new technology or something to promote a great deal about. On the other hand, the stabilisation struts have been a great idea....

    Perhaps they could turn it the other way a bit and promote the problems we are coming up against with changing technology and the fact that SOME manufacturers are doing very little to educate the responders....
    Luke

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    The tools today are much better than they were say 10 to 20 years ago. Years ago the spreader did 90% of the work. Remember when you used to "pop" the doors? You used the spreaders or jaws until the hinges broke or the nader gave out. Today with the advent of cutters that can cut almost anything, it's "expose and cut". Expose the hinges and cut them, expose the naders and cut them. Way back when, the cutters were only used primarily to take the roof.
    Today we also have various rams, another godsend. Remember using the spreaders to pull the steering wheel. You needed the spreaders, chains, wood chocks, etc. A lost art for many, Today it's called a "dash roll".
    Carl Avery mentioned the air bag data for a palm pilot. Another great innovation for the extricator. I have all the air bag data and seatbelt pretensioner locations in my palm. Our extrication team used the palm pilot at the International extrication competition in Minn this past summer. We also used a snake eye camera to locate trapped occupants in a crushed roll over scenario. The snake eye is a video camera with the lens mounted on a long flexible rod. It can get into some really tight places when you cant get a visual on a trapped occupant. As a result of using these 2 tools in the competition, we won the "innovation award" at the International. Although we did not place (1st 2nd or 3rd) in the competition, we were honored to be considered the most innovative team there. It was also a true learning experince for us competeing against the best teams in the world.
    As far as excellence in this field, I would say that it would have to go to a Canadian team or fire dept like Missisaggua. After all they practically invented TERC

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