Thread: 75' Quints

  1. #1
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    Question 75' Quints

    I was wanting to gather a few opinions on single axle, 75' quints. The info I'm looking for would be Manufacturer recomendations, some different features and any one with some hands on experience. I can read specs all day but that doesn't tell me much about dependability and function. Also, I was curious about the hose load system on the Smeals. Any opinions about that? Also, I know this may be brought up, staffing would not be an issue for the quint.

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    Well that rules out Pierce. The last word heard about 75' quints on a single rear axle and Pierce was that they don't go together. A neighboring career department to mine had a 75' RM single axle quint by Pierce. They went to spec a replacement and were told by Pierce that they would only build it on a tandem rear end. My experience with them is on an E-One 75' rear mount, only 2 rear outriggers, Series 60 470HP, HD4060P with a Super Jake, 2000GPM single stage Hale, 500GWT, 20 gallons Class "A", 2 crosslays, 1 frt bumper line, 1 rear pre-connect, pull out tool boards, trays and drop down shelves, extrication equipment off the rear, 10KW AMPS PTO generator, etc. This was speced and built without the side-stacker body. Been a very good rig with minimal down time. Runs alot and has held up well. They added floodlights above the windshield that were an excellant idea. The Smeal 75' quint I went over from St. Louis had some nice ideas like fire man proof cab interior (Or the closest I have seen). The rear pre-connects are in the side upper compartments which is against the norm and seem a little difficult to load, but I don't ride on them. Sutphen can also build one I believe along the lines of what your looking for as can a few other builders. Just spec it the way YOU want and need it and don't let the maker back you off of ideas for THEIR reasons.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    According to all the manufacturer's documentation, all of them make a 75' single axle. E-One, KME, Pierce, Sutphen, ALF, Smeal, all make one, but the tip loads are at most 500lbs when flowing. Sutphen does make a 70+ (beats me it's in the marketing material) platform that's 750lbs dry and 500lbs flowing.

    Irregardless, Larry's right, spec what you need and see who can deliver. One thought that we've been going through while thinking about aerials, is how long is this truck going to be in service, and will there be the need in that period of time, to have a longer aerial? We don't need more than a 75' now, and getting more than a single axle truck around would be tough, but within the 15 years of service that we'd hope to get out of an aerial, we could easily end up needing that 100' (or more) stick. And at the speed that prices are going up, it may be worth it to go to the bigger one now.

    Definitely get out and look at as many trucks as you can and talk to the people that spec'd it, and see what they wish they had done differently. You'll always learn more off of what they had wish they had done, than what they have.

    Happy hunting.

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    BC79er, you hit on an excellant point. Spec for future growth. And growth in terms of the area you protect and growth for future additions to the tool and equipment inventory on the rig. Just because you don't have 300,000 + square foot warehouses now doesn't mean you won't 5 or 6 years from now. Or you may have a 4 story eldery care home 10 years from on the same land where you currently have SFD's.
    As for the other makers building 75' rear mounts on single axles, your right. But the addition of the pump and tank for a quint does in fact rule out some of them because of the additional weight. Just some thoughts.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    Default Smeal quints

    I have been around several quints of this type produced by Smeal. They are very well designed trucks and when used for what they are they can be pretty effective. They have also got a few features the others don't have. The other guys are right though, if there is any future expansion expected for your area, you may need something bigger. A quint is no replacement for a full aerial ladder. They are best used as basically a pumper with a little extra punch. Smeal's Ergonomic Hose Load is a pretty neat contraption. It helps alleviate the common problem of a quint not having enough LDH hose due to the ladder mounting. If you guys go for a Smeal, the EHL it is definitely worth it. It also makes loading hose much easier.
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    Don't count out a tandem until you drive or road test one. We just purchased a Pierce 75' Quint on a tandem axle. It is 38'10" long overall but turns inside of our single axle Rescue that is 34' long and inside our engine that is around 31' long. I was dead set against getting a tandem for several reasons until I drove one. After driving and talking to manufactures about stopping and handling and the extra load carrying abilty of a tandem we deciced to seriouly start trying tandems. We set up a road course in our area which is rural to industrial and made each company bring a truck out to test drive. If the truck couldn't complete the test we took it out of the bidding. E-one and Pierce did the best in the test. To see a photo of our new Quint goto: http://home.kiski.net/~wtfire/index.htm

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    Thanks for the comments guys, I'll throw in here that we do have a 105' platform. We are looking to suppliment our capabilities, and our manuverability.

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    My company operates a 75' E-One Single Axle Quint. The Current one we have is a 1999 model the 1994 model that we used until a month ago was breaking down constantly, so we switched out with one of our slower companies.

    Some issues you will have to consider...

    What are the Height issues in your district? 75 feet doesn't reach much. Vertically or especially horizontally.

    Large Ground ladders (30'+ will have to be three section) and unless you give up alot of storage on one side you can't carry and Bangor ladders. (Throwing a 40 pole ladder is much easier and safer than with a three section 35)'

    Single Axle creates alot of wear and maintance issues. Brakes, Suspension, springs, etc... If this rig will be in a busy company you might want to consider this.

    What is more important manuverability or capabilities? Do you need a truck that will run in tight congested areas or cul-de-sac streets? Are you looking for an elevated master stream or another ladder for Roof/Rescue operations. How often do you show up and really need that aerial...Depending on your answers you might also consider a Engine with a articulating Snorkle boom like Philly has. This would give you a Engine with Manuverability and the Capability of an elevated Stream as well.

    The more things (ladder, Generator, Gadgets) on one rig...the more things that can go wrong and place the rig out of service.

    What are your equipment storage needs today...what will they be tommorow??? There is limited space on these rigs.

    These are just some things you might want to look at or consider. I really don't know what your Depts situation is. All I can offer is what I see from my perspective and how it affects my company.

    You should look to see how it will fit into your operations and design it around that criteria in the order of importance to its mission. I know that Kansas City is doing away with the few Quints it had for many of the same reasons I just listed above. Bascily it didn't fit their needs. So basicly make sure you by a rig that meets what you need not what St. Louis or Phonenix or wherever needs.

    As for my opinion I'll be honest the reliabily and function of the Single Axle quint from my experience is that it is Not very good as an engine and terrible as a ladder. It is truly a "Jack of All Trades and a Master of None".

    I would like the others said before look at a double axle and perhaps some of the problems will be taken care of.

    I wish you luck and I hope you find a rig that meets the need of your Department and Citizens.

    FTM-PTB
    Last edited by FFFRED; 11-29-2002 at 11:38 AM.

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    Hmmmm......
    A 75'Quint you say?
    Recently while looking in to the same questions as you, I came to realize that some builders will give you exactly what you ask for....regardless of it's usefulness.
    A single axle quint with 500 gallons of water and compartments on both sides would give you some serious payload issues on a 31,000 lb axle.
    While I asked a few dealers about this, "Well, WE'VE never had a problem with it, but we've only built a few" (a well known Wisconsin company, no, not Pierce, same town though).
    LTI /American LaFrance was the only dealer to be up front about it.
    Considering that they've built literally thousands of trucks (LTI) I felt they might know what they were talking about.
    By the time you add all the water, hose, equipment, foam, etc...how much weight will you be carrying?
    If you can figure that part out first, then you will be able to determine the axle configuration that would best suit your need.

    Good Luck!

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    If you go with a steel aerial, you are probably totally correct to be concerned about weight. An aluminum ladder, like what E-One uses has much less weight on the rear axle so it can be done safely.

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