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  1. #1
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    Default ATV Rescue cart/trailer

    Looking for types of carts/trailers used to extricate patients from the mountains or trails after ATV accidents. Do you have a specific type or know where any can be purchased. THANKS!


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber tecrsq's Avatar
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    TecRsq
    North Georgia

    - Let No Mans Ghost Come Back To Say My Fire Training Let Me Down -

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber ShaversFork's Avatar
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    Default

    We utilize a Polaris Ranger six wheel. Only issue is belt drive vs gears. Braking becomes a serious issue on downhill and steep traverses. After spending the money on the Polaris and having a few close calls, we changed our Rescue SOG. In steep decents,all but the vehicle operator disembark and walk behind vehicle- same goes for ascents as if the machine can't make the climb it's a bear to back down.
    If I had it to do over again I would purchase the PUG. It articulates, is overpowered and is the machine. The JD Gator is ok for the golf course and the 2% grades but has the same issues as the Mule and the Ranger.

  4. #4
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    Check out:
    http://www.cubcadet.com/webapp/wcs/s...10212_16212_-1



    I designed this unit (mechanical engineer for Cub Cadet) and have done quite a bit of testing versus other vehicles. Our price is much lower than the competition, and we have a far superior vehicle than the others out there. The independent suspension sets this vehicle apart from all others.

  5. #5
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    Check out www.triplesrescuecarts.com We have the best cart on the market. Check it out and give me a call. Jeff

  6. #6
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    Default

    Check out Orion Industries.
    http://www.orionsleds.com/2402.html

    They make a nice sled. It has a clam shell cover that pops off. Also has a platform on the back for an attendant. We have one. We have the wheel kit and the ski kit. Handy here in Vermont. Has worked well for us. The sled also makes a great freight sled for towing gear around. Just take the cover off. We have used it in the past to haul dive gear to inaccesible locations.
    We use two ATV's to haul. We have a 400cc Bombardier Outlander ATV and a 650cc Bombardier Traxter. Reason we went with Bombardier is that they are 2man ATv's. So far so good.
    Here is a link to look at what we are using. Bottom row. This pic shows it with the ski kit.
    http://www.colchesterrescue.org/tech_pics.html

    If you need more info, email.

    C....

  7. #7
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    Asheville, North Carolina, United States of America
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    Default Give a call to....

    Black Mountain Fire and Rescue or Swannanoa Fire and Rescue in Buncombe County North Carolina. They built their own ATV trailers for patient removal from wilderness settings and both have darn clever designs, and they work great. I think they would be willing to share their design.
    Pray for the dead, fight like hell for the living! - Mother Jones

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber EEResQ's Avatar
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    Thumbs up All Terrain Rescue Trailers

    As we are throwing out ideas for available ATV Rescue Trailers, here's one that is catching on in several regions of the USA:
    http://www.EEResQ.com

    Here's a link to their photo gallery:
    http://eeresq.com/id9.html
    Last edited by EEResQ; 12-12-2010 at 04:21 PM. Reason: Corrected link.

  9. #9
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    Default Check this out

    Have you seen the "ATEV's" All Terrain Emergency Vehicles from CARBA?
    They will go anywhere and even float. With tracks, they go in deep snow and mud. Check out the Medical Search and Rescue one. find at www.carbafiretech.com .Patient is protected inside the vehicle and the EMT's can evenwork on them while moving. Also, the comment section talks about their use. Hope this is helpful.

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber EEResQ's Avatar
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    Default

    Lets see if I can get the link to Off Road Rescue to post this time?

    Here's a link to their gallery: Off Road ResQ Squad Photos

    Be SAFE out there!
    Last edited by EEResQ; 12-12-2010 at 04:23 PM. Reason: Info update.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber mcaldwell's Avatar
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    Panorama, British Columbia, Canada
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    Default

    We haven't gotten around to picking up a tow-behind unit of our own just yet, but the local snowmobile & ATV tour operator has one of these that we have used before:

    http://www.eqnx.biz/rescue/snowbulance.html



    It is a good little unit, can be used with skis or ATV wheels, and works well in most terrain. The only downside is that in the summer heat, it is absolutely unbearable to be inside. We have talked about making the windows removeable, so they can be taken out in summer. Then it would have the benefit of limited element protection, shade, and still allow air movement.

    The big plus to this unit is that you can leave it fully stocked with major incident gear, and just hook up and go when needed.
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

    IACOJ

  12. #12
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    Default specialized rescue

    You may want to check out a multipurpose Kaw Mule at www.staufferco.com . This set-up covers a variety of duties.

  13. #13
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    Our departments been running wilderness rescue for almost 8 years now with a polaris 6X6. We started with a pull behind cart that was made by a company in CA(I believe they are no longer in business). Over several years of doing this we frown upon using the cart now for extrication. Now we place the stokes basket in the rear of the 6X6. We did this for several reasons. It's a smoother ride for the patient. A attendent can ride with the patient. It's easier going over large obsitcles and gullies. Plus it removes the possiblity of the cart fliping. Extra people don't have to walk a long side of the cart, which means less breaks and a faster extrication. However, when we are activated for a rescue we have a seat that is placed in the back of the 6X6 to carry personnel in. We tow the cart with the 6X6 in with us loaded with all are medical equipment, rope equipment, etc. When we get to the location we remove the equipment and the stokes. Package the patient in the stokes basket, and place it on the 6X6 we remove the patient normally with 3 people. Once the patient is safely in the medic unit we proceed back to pick-up the remaining personnel and equipment. We use GPS units so this is not a probelm. This system has worked well for us and we plan on using this for a long time to come. As far as putting the stokes in the bed of the 6X6 all we did was modify the dump mechanism to prevent unwanted dumping of the patient. and we place 2 hooks at the front of the bed to secure the basket, and then 2 quick straps near the feet to secure side to side movement. I will see if I can post some pics here for you.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber EEResQ's Avatar
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    Thumbs up "All Terrain Rescue"

    Quote Originally Posted by rescuetech147 View Post
    ...Now we place the stokes basket in the rear of the 6X6. We did this for several reasons. It's a smoother ride for the patient. A attendent can ride with the patient. It's easier going over large obsitcles and gullies. Plus it removes the possiblity of the cart fliping. Extra people don't have to walk a long side of the cart, which means less breaks and a faster extrication. . ..
    Sounds like you have a good system for open areas or Jeep type 4x4 trails. However, the 6x6's and similar sized UTV's are from 56" to 63" in width. This makes for difficut passage through deep woods and on most typical ATV / OHV trails.

    If your "pull behind cart" is flipping over during rescue operations, this may be the reason the builder is no longer in business. Several ATV trailers have hit the market over the last 10 years. Many are little more than down-sized utilty trailers, or "Kit" built trailers, modified to carry a litter. Unfortuately, most had little or no engineering behind their designs, and few included an adequate suspension system; critical in the safe handling of any vehicle.

    Today, I am aware of at least seven competent All Terrain Rescue Trailer manufacturers in North American: ASE in Utah, ALL TERRAIN RES-Q in New York, EQUINOX in Manitoba, MOUNTAIN GOAT in Nebraska, NICHOLS in Maine, ORION in Minnesota and OUTDOORSPORTS in California. These manufacturers produce ATV Rescue Trailers and Snowmobile Rescue Trailers (more commonly refered to as sleds).


    Here's a link to a great article by JIM THEODORE in FIRE-RESCUE News titled:
    "ALL TERRAIN RESCUE"
    http://www.firerescue1.com/firerescu...e/23-12/13798/
    In his article, Jim (a leading off-road rescue instructor in MN), states:

    "The choices are endless, but budgets are not. If you have the opportunity to participate in your department's decision to purchase an off-road rescue vehicle, aim for an all-around, versatile ATV. Deciding factors include multi-surface adaptability, smooth victim ride, maneuverability, carrying capacity and cost. If forced to name the best off-road rescue option for the everyday fire/rescue agency, I would select a narrow-width ATV and trailer combination. Rescue trailer manufacturers typically offer change-out ski-to-wheel kits, making these vehicles the most versatile devices on the market. They are very stable and smooth, and move well on snow, ice, mud, grass or asphalt, based on the appropriate suspension and surface interface (wheels or skis)."

    I hope this helps in your decisions. Whatever you decide, please get the appropriate training prior to operating any off-road vehicle (with or without a trailer) during rescue operations. http://eeresq.com

    As always, BE SAFE OUT THERE!

    EEResQ
    KY
    Last edited by EEResQ; 12-12-2010 at 04:24 PM. Reason: Correction

  15. #15
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EEResQ View Post
    Sounds like you have a good system for open areas or Jeep type 4x4 trails. However, the 6x6's and similar sized UTV's are from 56" to 63" in width. This makes for difficut passage through deep woods and on most typical ATV / OHV trails.
    Well as long as we have had this unit we have always gotten to where smaller ATV's go, and because of its width and extra set of wheels we have even been places where the smaller ones couldn't. Of course we have had one or 2 occasions where we had to take down a tree, but a chain saw makes fast work of that. I remember one time to be exact we had a hunter fall out of a tree stand about 2 miles back an ATV trail. We got about 100 feet from the hunter, but there was 1 tree in our way and a steep creek bed. They were going to bring the patient to us, but we told them to wait. 2 mins. we where to them. There was no way that an ATV with a cart would have made it. We actually had to take ours off and pull it out, but with the pt. in the back we had no problem getting back through it. I also remember a run where we went through a mud puddle about 2 1/2 to 3 feet deep. Our patient was still above the mud, but with a cart the would have been for the lack of a better word sunk. To be honest I cant ever remember using it on anything other than ATV trails. There are not really any big areas for jeep or 4X4. That is why we went with an ATV and not a jeep or something.

    When I was saying about the cart flipping I was referring to when we go over large obsticles like trees and large rocks. It ran pretty decent running down atv trails. Like I said we still use it every time to haul equipment in.

    The one problem I saw early on when we first got the unit and were using the cart was going up and down hills. Those carts when loaded and going down a steep hill tend to slide sideways, and if you have a patient in it it could end in trouble. Also, if you try to go through really deep creek valleys they tend to get stuck pretty easy. In our area this has worked out great for us where the cart has not. I'm not saying this is the best way, but this is what works for our area. I'm sure that in some areas this might not be an option, and a cart is. But these are my experiences with them.

    John Walter
    Central VFC
    SW PA

  16. #16
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    Default specialized rescue

    The Kawasaki Mule Trans offers patient transport in the cabin area where they will be most protected and have the smoothest ride, the back seat allows the pt to be attended by a medic. The unique configuration of these units built by www.staufferco.com is the fact that after the pt has been delivered to the 1st aid station or rescue squad--the unit quickly transforms back to hauling 5~6 people and providing a multitude of sevices.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  17. #17
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    Default Specialized Rescue

    www.urbancustomllc.com

    Urban Custom LLC
    Specialty Vehicles

    Flanders , NJ , 07836
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by URBANCUSTOM06; 02-18-2007 at 08:37 AM. Reason: misspell

  18. #18
    Forum Member 1500chief@sbcglobal.net's Avatar
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    Default

    There are some good ideas here. Carring a chainsaw is a great idea. The only poblem that we have here in southern Ohio is that trails are often limited to 50". To ensure this forestry service will place large boulders about 52" apart. This eliminates the wider vehicles. I know that our county has a 4X4 gator, it only comes out for fairs, parades and events like that. If we have a rescue operation out on the trails in our area, they call for our cart and our Honda Rubicon.

    http://www.triplesrescuecarts.com/im...wwwwww_012.jpg


    1500chief

  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber EEResQ's Avatar
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    Thumbs up All Terrain Rescue Trailer

    Hiking trail width restrictions, trailer stability, patient comfort and rescuer safety are combined in this ATV Rescue and Snowmobile Rescue Trailer.
    With 56 of units in 25 states, they've proven themselves in all kinds of situations and environments.
    http://eeresq.com/ ATV Off-Road Rescue Trailers
    Last edited by EEResQ; 12-12-2010 at 04:25 PM. Reason: Updated information.

  20. #20
    Forum Member Fyrtrks's Avatar
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    Default Rescue Hitch

    I am looking for a system to carry the stokes basket on the class III hitch on the back of a rescue unit. It is a small unit and there are areas where the ambo can't get in and it doesn't require an ATV just a 4x4 with a profile smaller than the ambo. It may be a once in a lifetime thing but it sure would be nice. I thought I saw one somewhere but I can't find it now.


    Please Help.
    Fyrtrks

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