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  1. #1
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    Cool Which load do you use on your crosslay?

    Just wondering which crosslay loads you all use.We use the minuteman load, we love it,it works great.





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  2. #2
    Forum Member dragonfyre's Avatar
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    Another vote for Minuteman. We have it on both our pumpers.
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  3. #3
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default What I have used...

    I think it is some what of a modifed minute man.
    The nozzle on top, in the middle. Then you can
    pull it off both sides. Forget the nozzle in the
    middle stuff, too much of a pain. Two loops on
    the bottom make it easy to pull out, flip on your
    shoulder then plenty of working line to pay off.

    Oh...there can be 2 loops on the bottom to pull
    the load out.

    Works nice...
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 11-18-2002 at 10:57 PM.

  4. #4
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Unhappy I CAN'T DO IT !!!!

    One of the things about my management style is that I prefer to get a concensus when we do anything that affects operations. One thing that I am alone with is my ideal preconnect load. Only one section wide (some people call them "Slot Loads") racked straight up with the nozzle on top. No shoulder load, no flipping over, JUST GRAB THE PIPE AND RUN!!!! When you get all the hose out of the bed, you'll stop. After all, the other end of the hose is connected to the discharge. Alas, my people like to carry hose on their shoulder. Oh well.....Stay Safe....
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  5. #5
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    Talking

    We use CALLFBOU's post:
    I think it is some what of a modifed minute man.
    We also use the loop's we put loop's every 100' feet so you know how much host your grabbing. We used to put the nozzles on the side but umm we had a couple instances where hoses have fallen out on corners and well 2 to 3 hundered feet of 1 3/4 along the road before you notice it is pretty embarasing so now there in the middle.
    There's an old saying around the firehouse."You
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  6. #6
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    For years we used the old flat lay. Easy and quick to load, and as mentioned above grab the nozzle and go.

    Only problem is that if you only advanced part of the line before charging, you dumped the rest on the ground and it looked like a mess of spagetti. Not to mention all the kinks and twists.

    In the last year we went to the TRIPLE LAY load. I had been shown this load years ago, but finally convinced our guys to use it. While it takes a few more minutes to load, it comes off clean and flakes out in a nice S type pattern behind you.

  7. #7
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    My Dept. speedlays and crosslays are triple pack for quick deployment in the tight streets in our town. Very easy to pack back on the apparatus.

  8. #8
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    Hey calffbou, you think you can get me a pic of that load or explain it.



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  9. #9
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Exclamation Wait a minute...

    I have to step in on this one. I am NOT a big fan of
    nozzle "grab and go". Why? I like having some working
    line on my shoulder to make entry with. Yeah, yeah you
    can pull line in the structure, but having some working
    line with you is the best.

    And if it is just a few folds on the ground, you can
    still charge them and not have "spegetti".

    And to the guy up above, I dont know if I have any
    pictures, I will look. My current dept. uses the
    regular minute man load. (nozzle in the middle)
    It is basiclly a FLAT LOAD with 2 pull loops on the
    bottom OR with a fold each on the bottom. Then build
    up the load, criss crossing is nice because it keeps
    the package together. Then just put the nozzle in the
    middle on top to be accessed by either side. I hope
    that explains it or I could try to draw it I guess.
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 11-18-2002 at 11:27 PM.

  10. #10
    IACOJ Agitator Adze39's Avatar
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    Crosslays are 200 ft each. We have two 1.75" lines and one 2.5" line. Each crosslay is two hoses wide.

    After two layers of a flat lay (usually the first 50ft section of hose), we create two pull loops (or as we call them "dog ears") on both ends of the bed. The rest of the hose is flat laid on top of that. The nozzle rests on one end of the bed, with an indicator loop at the other end so we know which side the nozzle is on. The nozzles on the two 1.75" lines face the opposite sides of the beds. The indicator loop is a loop that sits on top of the bed on its side, in other words it does not stick out of the bed.

    Someone stretching the line would throw the nozzle over one of their shoulders, and stick the opposite arm in through the loops. Once he feels the tug on the line, he drops the loops and continues on with the nozzle. Some guys are good enough to drop the loops seperately.
    Last edited by Adze39; 11-19-2002 at 12:10 PM.
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  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber UTFFEMT's Avatar
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    Talking

    Back to the origonal Question. Crosslays, we currently use the flat load for each cross lay that is 1 3/4 attack lines 100feet and 150 feet rewspectively. Our Rear Pre connects are 250 Feet Each 1 3/4 lines and are a modified minute man and seem to work ok. We did have the Tripple load and prefer that over the minuteman, but the older farts won the battle and we went back into the 60's with the modified minuteman. When some more retirements occurr, I think we will try to get back to the triple fold again. At Least hopefully.
    Front line since 1983 and still going strong

  12. #12
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    Question I'm not sure if there is a name for ours

    We spent hours trying to come up with a better way to load. We tryed on the shoulder on the ground and always had kinks and twists. Here's what we are doing right now.

    Our crosslays are wide enough to allow 3 vertical stacks of hose. We use 200 feet of 1 3/4 hose.

    We pack 60 - 70 feet vertical and then put a dog ear on each side of the truck.

    Continue stacking another 60 - 70 feet onto the same vertical stack.

    Now split the stack at the dog ears turn the top stack upside down and lay it along side the first 60 - 70 feet. The dog ears are now on the top of the two stacks.
    Stack remaining hose in the hose bed. When you get to the end, leave a gog ear on each side with the nozzle in the middle.

    To use the load, grab the 2 dog ears and go. The hose feeds off the truck from the top of the 3 stacks. 60 - 70 feet from the truck you will come to the end having 200 feet in a squashed "Z" shape. Charge the line and it turns into a nice big "S" ready to go.

    I have yet to see a load where you pull a stack onto the ground work. It always seems to to kink and tangle unless you run out the length of the hose.
    Can anyone explain the minuteman load? This works well but, we are always looking for a better way.

  13. #13
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    We use a flat load with couple of loops in it so we pull the whole thing at once. It only takes a few seconds to get it separated. By this time the captain has done his walk around or what ever. We have 150' 1.75 and 200' 1.75
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  14. #14
    Senior Member raven911's Avatar
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    Default Triple fold crosslay

    Back when I used to be a member of an engine company we used the triple fold quite a bit. The only real problem I have seen with it is that it can be hard to maneuver correctly in a restricted or tight space. Don't even ask about advancing up a stairwell. You end up dragging most of it behind you. They do however work quite well for general use. About the dumbest load I have ever seen was a rolled front bumber speed-lay. Our chief insisted on rolling the 100' section. He said it was quicker. I guess he never had to use it so he just didn't know how awkward it really was.
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  15. #15
    Forum Member Fire304's Avatar
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    Talking We Use Hose w/ a nozzle

    I dislike the minuteman due to the fact you have to pull it from one side, but it sounds like you guys have some solutions to that problem.

    I prefer the triple, it works best in most situations, the problem is that with 8 different officers and 40 total firefighters, it gets loaded a different way depending on who loads it. While working at a combination department we had 3 distictly different styles of loading (and it did make a difference in how it came out) based on which watch was on duty last time it was repacked. Once I grabbed the loop, started running for the door and was brought up short, about 20 feet from the truck. I ended up flat on my back with the wind knocked out of me. We ended up going back to a flat load for simplicity, you knew you had to pull it all out before charging, no surprises.

  16. #16
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    We use minuteman. We sue to use triple pack but it takes too many people to pack back on apparatus. Now 2 or 3 guys can pack a 200ft crosslay in no time.

  17. #17
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    Depending on the truck, we use flat lays, minute man, and reverse horseshoe. I prefer the horseshoe load because it pulls easily, doesnt tangle very much (unless you drop a loop!), and its easy to repack.
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  18. #18
    Junior Member Lt3389's Avatar
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    Default Tried several, picked one that works

    We use a flat load that’s been very good to us so far. Our 150’ X 1 ¾” cross-lays are loaded with one loop per side just after the first 50’ is loaded. The remaining 100’ of the hose is loaded without any more loops and the nozzle to one side. (The other cross-lay has its nozzle to the other side.)

    When it is pulled, you grab the nozzle in one hand and the loop in the other and (here is the part I hate) you pull the whole mess out onto the ground and start heading for the door. The benefit is you can head in any direction and before you get 50’ from the rig, all your hose is laid out in a nice S shape. About 90%+ of our structures are two story homes 50-70 feet off the road so this works well for us.

    On our 200’ rear preconnects we just put the loop at about 70’. It works out the same way.

    My personal favorite is the Triple Layer Load by far, but the difficulties in loading it has caused us to abandon it.
    Lt3389


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  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    We have 3 racks of one lay wide, each with 150' of 1-1/2", nozzle in the middle of the top lay. Grab the nozzle and go basically. We do occasionally run into tangle/spaghetti problems, but usually because we have limited space to play in.

    Normally one guy grabs the nozzle and runs while a second from the Engine starts flaking it out and the Driver/Engineer fires up the pump. Most of the time it works out very well and with the nozzle in the middle the line can be pulled from either side.
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  20. #20
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Sorry...

    I really dont care for the triple fold. Too much
    hassle to load up, need extra people and it can
    fall apart will loading. Plus, again, I like having
    WORKING line to deal with when advancing.

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